How do I get OTA HD on TiVoHD onto server as HD MP4?

Discussion in 'TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo' started by IEBA, Oct 8, 2011.

  1. Oct 8, 2011 #1 of 32
    IEBA

    IEBA Anthony

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    I want to take HD movies recorded on my TiVo HD from an OTA signal and somehow get them to be MP4 files on my home server that pyTiVo can serve back to my TiVo HD when I have time to watch them.

    There's so much free content that passes by it's not even funny. I'd love to bank some of this for when I actually have time to sit down and watch a movie.

    I have Toast 9 and it only allows for a 480 x 360 conversion which is below even SD resolution. Fine for an iPhone, maybe, but not for an HDTV at home. What do I need to do, use, get?

    Oh, and keeping the TiVo information on the file would be a nice trick too. This way, picking a movie with my wife would be a lot easier than looking at a Movie Title that neither of us know.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Oct 9, 2011 #2 of 32
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Since you'll be going from a particular TiVo to a computer, and from that computer back to the same TiVo, and since the recordings are OTA and not satellite or cable, so no anti-copy bit to worry about, would not TiVo Desktop do what you need done, which is store the movie on the computer until you're ready to copy it back onto the TiVo to watch it?
     
  3. Oct 9, 2011 #3 of 32
    lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    VideoRedo TV Suite version 4 is your best bet. Use the h.264 in .mp4 recoding profile. If you want to give it a try, you can download a trial copy of VRD and use it for 15 days before deciding to buy it.

    There is no such thing as free content. That content costs you several hundred dollars a month.

    Use pyTivo to serve the video back to the TiVo. You will want to push the file, not pull it. For a really slick, very usable menu system (far superior to the TiVo Now Playing List), use vidmgr as the front end for pyTivo. The easiest way to generate the metadata is to use kmttg for uploading to the server. When transferring to the server, kmttg automatically creates the metafile for the video, and it can automatically create a project file containing edits to remove the commercials. It can also automatically pass off the project file to VRD to apply the edits and recode the video, but I do not recommend this.
     
  4. Oct 9, 2011 #4 of 32
    ggieseke

    ggieseke Well-Known Member

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    Why not just keep them in .TiVo format? It will take up more disk space as MPEG-2, but no conversion would be needed and the metadata would stay intact.
     
  5. Oct 9, 2011 #5 of 32
    jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

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    Tivo to the server, I use kmttg which also does a quick stream fix and marks the commercials for deletion. I manually review and edit the cuts then let Videoredo take over and save the mpeg 2 file. I then use meGUI for the mpeg2 to h264 in a mp4 conversion. Use meGUI for bluray and other video sources as well so more familur than the h264 conversion in VRD which is pretty limited in its handling of h264 and audio parameters.

    End result is mp4 files with a metadata file so that when pushed back to tivo it is fast, full resolution and has all (and sometimes more) information in tact.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2011 #6 of 32
    jcthorne

    jcthorne Well-Known Member

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    Because .tivo files are incompatible with anything other than a tivo, they take up too much space and they cannot be pushed back to the tivo in less than real time for instant selection and playback from a server.

    Conversion to properly encoded mp4 files accomplishes all these things.
     
  7. Oct 9, 2011 #7 of 32
    unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    However, if you're using TiVo Desktop you can pull them with the TiVo (or another TiVo on the same account) and start watching before they've finished copying.

    Which may suffice for the OP's needs.
     
  8. Oct 9, 2011 #8 of 32
    ggieseke

    ggieseke Well-Known Member

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    The OP only mentioned playing them back on his TiVo HD, so I was just curious. Converting them seems like a lot of work for an OTA movie that he will probably only watch once and then delete.
     
  9. Oct 9, 2011 #9 of 32
    IEBA

    IEBA Anthony

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    This is a good question. Right now we have a Blu-ray player in the home theatre but it doesn't support DLNA. We're looking to replace it with a DLNA capable Blu-ray player. We may also add a simple box in the guest bedroom. I don't want to pay TiVo for each connected box when they aren't needed for recording so those boxes won't be TiVos, so MP4 provides more universal playback.

    I will look into those other software packages later today. (Here's hoping they're PPC Mac compatible)
     
  10. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    "I want to take HD movies recorded on my TiVo HD from an OTA signal and somehow get them to be MP4 files on my home server that pyTiVo can serve back to my TiVo HD when I have time to watch them."

    So which is it, you want to watch the recordings later on a TiVo, or you want to watch them later on something other than a TiVo?
     
  11. IEBA

    IEBA Anthony

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    Right now... HD back onto the TiVo HD.
    In the future I plan on adding devices that I know can play back MP4 files.
    But I was trying to keep the question simple. :)
     
  12. IEBA

    IEBA Anthony

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    How does OTA cost me several hundred dollars a month?
     
  13. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    From where do you think the revenue the National Networks make comes? It comes right out of your pocket and mine. Over 700 $Billion last year, and up to 30% of your spending. Every apple or can of beans you buy bears a hefty cost for advertising. Some bear more, some less, but virtually every new item you purchase new is loaded to the gills with the outrageously over-bloated cost of producing Survivor and As The World Turns. Do the math. $700 Billion divided by 300 Million residents comes up to $2300 for every man, woman, and child, passed straight through the retail chain to come out of your pocket. If yours is an average family of 2 parents and 2 children, that's something near $9200 a year for the priveledge of watching The Apprentice and Desperate Housewives.
     
  14. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    If you are going to recode to h.264, the QSF is unnecessary. The stream parameters will be adjusted / repaired when recoding. It's not possible to recode without doing it.

    For your purposes, but not for his, per his stated requirements.

    Unfortunately, that's not true. I'm not saying the holes in the metadata transfer are sufficient to compel one not to employ this strategy, but development of the push feature lies outside the realm of TiVo's official SDK support, and what we do know of the push parameters has been gleaned entirely from empirical observation. Many of the parameters are not implemented. It's still a terrific solution, but it is not true all of the metadata is intact.
     
  15. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    If the source content is still on the TiVo, then there is no point in pulling it back from the server.

    TiVoDesktop is such a hideously bad piece of... software, I see no point in attempting to run it in any case.
     
  16. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    We're talking about TiVos here, there is no simple.;)
     
  17. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    I was replying to someone saying that .tivo files couldn't be pushed from the computer by saying that they could be pulled from the computer by the (or a) TiVo, and that that might be good enough for what the OP has in mind.

    Right now, Desktop does what I ask of it, and at no addition cost, although I can't say I don't get annoyed with the rather clunky user interface.
     
  18. unitron

    unitron Well-Known Member

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    Just to be nitpicky, I think we've finished paying for As The World Turns.

    There's also some argument to be made that advertising, by increasing the number of people buying product X, enables economies of scale that allow them to sell product X for less than you'd pay for it if it was never advertised anywhere.

    But then again, it's all Monopoly Money these days anyway, no way to tell what's really going on.:confused:
     
  19. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    Is it off the air? OK, substitute the name of the soap opera of your choice.

    It is a specious argument. It's only true if

    1. The market is a free market. This means, among other things, that there are too many suppliers in the market for any single supplier to affect the supply volume or cost.

    2. There is feedback from the consumers on the demand for the products. This is the normal state of affairs in an economy, but it is broken when the consumer of the goods is not the buyer of the goods, particularly when the consumer of the goods has no input to the outlay of cash. If the consumer dislikes the programming, it does not diminish the amount they have to pay for it.

    All one has to do is look at the salaries associated with the players in the TV biz and the amount of money scarfed up by the owners of the networks to dispel the notion the networks are anything like an economy of scale.

    There is no way to ascribe a particular dollar to having gone toward the purchase of a particular commercial, but that is not the point. Clearly, Americans are able to pay a surcharge of several thousand dollars a year on the products they purchase, but there is no way any of us would pay several thousand dollars a year for the drek provided by the national networks if they were being charged for it directly. One only has to look at the abysmal quality and low volume of junk on the national networks at $2300 per person and compare it with the much higher quality and quantity of programming available from PBS and from the Cable broadcasters for a fraction of that amount monthly to realize the national networks are not concerned about either volume or quality. The CATV broadcasters have to keep the volume high and the quality fairly good or else people won't pay for the services. They are selling television programming. The networks are not selling television programming. They are selling commercials.
     
  20. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    My point is, if (as the OP indicated) the file is on the TiVo and is to be copied to the server, then until it actually is copied to the server and deleted from the TiVo, it can be watched from the TiVo directly or transferred via MRV to watch on any other TiVo.

    It's badly broken and poorly considered.

    It does not have a Linux port. No application should call itself a server (or try to be a server) unless it has a Linux port.

    It cannot run on a network share. Any network application, let alone a server, that is not designed to work on a network share is just stupid.

    It is slow and klunky.

    It is buggy and error prone.

    It lacks most of the best features of all the competing softwares.

    It cannot be accessed by client software. (A server that doesn't support clients!?!?!)

    It is only supported by the NPL (HMO) interface, which is pathetic.

    I am unaware of any plug-ins or any SDK for it.

    It is highly limited in the types of files it can serve.
     

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