Help! Need to Replace Comcast

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by westpost, Aug 18, 2019.

  1. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Figures vary but the number that the FCC has reported is widely criticized as being too low because it relies on crude maps that are based on self-reported data from the broadband providers. They say that 24.7 million Americans don't have broadband access, which would amount to about 7.5% of the US population. Microsoft, OTOH, say that 162.8 million Americans are not accessing the internet at broadband speeds. That would amount to nearly half of us!

    Microsoft: FCC's broadband coverage maps are way off

    I would bet that the truth lies somewhere in between. Note that the FCC is talking about broadband availability while Microsoft is talking about those who actually access the internet at broadband speeds. There are certainly some Americans who *can* pay for broadband service (i.e. reliable download speeds of at least 25 Mbps) if they choose to but who do not. Still though, hard to imagine that there are enough who fall into that category to substantiate Microsoft's figure.

    At any rate, I can tell you that the federal government states that about 20% of Americans are classified as living in rural areas (vs. urban or suburban). We know for sure that our rural population is by far the most hit by lack of broadband access. But we also know that *some* folks out in the country and in small towns which qualify as rural under the federal definition DO have at least one broadband provider (cable, fiber co-op, etc.).

    So, all that to say, 15% strikes me as a plausible figure. Might be somewhat higher, could be a little lower.
     
  2. Charles R

    Charles R Active Member

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    The above is from 2016 data which I think is too old to be referenced. As such I'll pass on wondering what data they were representing such as only fixed, etc. I'm referencing fixed and non-fixed above a threshold and the government is quoting that at less than 2 per cent - somewhat outdated. Now whether you happen to believe them is another matter. And obviously there is a big difference between having it available and taking advantage of it.

    The stat I'm looking for is what percentage of the population has high speed Internet available. The number I keep coming up with is over 98%... last count. That's why I asked for any links that stated other wise. Microsoft referenced a number not using it (not whether it's available) so it's not really a data point.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
  3. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Would love to see where you're getting that 98% figure. I don't think I've ever seen it and I'd venture to say that virtually no one on the internet (whether peanut-gallery commenters or major tech media sources) would believe that 98% figure.
     
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  4. Charles R

    Charles R Active Member

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    As posted previously there are plenty of reports. Here's one...

    Approximately 98.1% of the country has access to either fixed terrestrial service at 25 Mbps/3 Mbps or mobile LTE at 10 Mbps/3 Mbps, with that number dropping to 89.7% in rural areas.

    I rather not use that as a current reference since it's rather dated (February 2018 - not sure the date of the actual data). I'd have to assume it has increased since then... and I'm wondering where it sits now. Here's a newer report with lots of data but it's still using older data. I'd much rather look at current data.

    Figure 2a shows that as of year-end 2017, approximately 99.8% of the American population lives in geographical areas covered by mobile LTE with a minimum advertised speed of 5 Mbps/1 Mbps, while approximately 98% had such coverage in 2013. Further, between 2013 and 2017, the percentage of Americans living in rural areas with coverage of LTE at 5 Mbps/1 Mbps increased from approximately 90% to approximately 99%.

    The above link breaks down coverage by various speeds and reports up to 99.9%. So I guess the only real debate is what speed is acceptable to be defined at or above the threshold.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
  5. mschnebly

    mschnebly Well-Known Member

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    Where some of my folks live in AR there is broadband available but no one can afford what they charge for it.
     
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  6. mschnebly

    mschnebly Well-Known Member

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    That's only if you choose the most extremely highest cord cutting option and don't mind fees and charges along with contracts that come with cable.
     
  7. BNBTivo

    BNBTivo Active Member

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    LTE is $80/mo for unlimited.
     
  8. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    = just shy of $1,000/year.
     
  9. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    In the ATL
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  10. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    In the ATL
    I'm paying less on Comcast with all the junk fees. AT&T is smoking crack if they think they're going to get $135 for a streaming cable replacement that doesn't include HSI.
     
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  11. Charles R

    Charles R Active Member

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    If you meet eligibility requirements Comcast provides service for $10 per month with free hardware and installation. I'd bet since eligibility is based on a government program all providers offer a similar plan.
     
  12. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Even if this statistic is correct, it's not at all helpful because the question we were discussing isn't the percentage of American who can get *either* broadband OR (slower, far more expensive) mobile LTE. We were only talking about how many can get home broadband service (at least 25/3).
     
  13. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Does this plan allow the customer to use their cell phone as a wifi hotspot so that other devices (e.g. Roku, laptop computer, etc.) could use its internet connection? Does this plan begin throttling speeds after a certain amount of data is consumed? Does this plan restrict all video to SD or does it allow full HD and 4K HDR quality?

    In the case of my Sprint plan with unlimited LTE data, the answer to all those questions is no. But even if the answer to all those questions is yes, what kind of speeds does the LTE network provide at your home? That can fluctuate greatly depending on the capabilities of the nearest tower, your phone, and your specific location. I've had my internet go out briefly more than once in the past year and at those times I was glad that I was able to rely on my unlimited data plan from Sprint on my cell phone. But the speed I can get inside my house, with about 2 out of 4 LTE bars, is only about 6 Mbps down and 1.5 Mbps up. It's fine for web surfing and email on my phone but, in my case, it simply wouldn't be a sufficient substitute for wired home internet service.
     
  14. Charles R

    Charles R Active Member

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    With 99.9% coverage it now becomes what speed is acceptable for streaming. From experience 10 Mbps can offer a pleasant experience more than acceptable but certainly not the ultimate. That speed is referenced at 98.1% (somewhat old) so I presume it's in the 99% as well.

    No we are discussing alternatives to satellite. And it shows only a percent (or less) have no alternative.
    That's not what you posted previously - see first quote. One can endlessly redefine the conditions and dismiss statistics based on your personal preferences or desire to alter the topic however those without an alternative to satellite is clearly around one percent (or less). Now if you don't happen to like their choices again that's a different matter as they still exist. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
  15. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    WRONG. :)

    Here's what I posted in post #41 above:

    Figures vary but the number that the FCC has reported is widely criticized as being too low because it relies on crude maps that are based on self-reported data from the broadband providers. They say that 24.7 million Americans don't have broadband access, which would amount to about 7.5% of the US population.​

    And how does the FCC define "broadband"? They define it as 25/3 wired home internet service (although they may not also be including certain types of uncapped wireless broadband service, such as Verizon 5G Home, Google Webpass, and Starry, although those services so far are just a drop in the national bucket).

    And you seem new to this area of inquiry. It's something I've been researching and discussing with others online for over a year now. You're completely off-base if you think that 99.9% of Americans can access even 10 Mbps download speeds in their homes today.
     
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  16. Charles R

    Charles R Active Member

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    It's your quote not mine... if it's wrong sorry. And since I have a working percentage... less than one I'll leave it at that and you can have the endless last word.

    If anyone has any actual data (to the contrary - not outdated and or irrelevant) I'm sure they will post it to show how wrong I am.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
  17. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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  18. NorthAlabama

    NorthAlabama tabasco rules

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    sweet home, al
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  19. BNBTivo

    BNBTivo Active Member

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    No throttling or anything of the sort. It's not a cell phone tether, either. It's rural internet. A router just like any other, wifi and wired. Powers up anything a normal router would. At my office and when traveling, I can generally up to 40mbps.

    It's unlimited, but obviously not to be abused. Realistically, if you were using under 1tb, probably no issues. If you wanted to run 4k round the clock, probably not for you.

    I use UbiFi, for what it's worth. Stream a bunch on it while traveling in our RV and use it for backup internet at my office, gets 40mbps at the office and is on a peplink as the fail over. Runs Netflix, YouTube TV, whatever, flawless, on 4 devices at the same time.

    Works great. It uses ATT. So obviously you would need att in your area. At my office, I put an extra antenna on the roof which took speeds from 10mbps to 40mbps. You can also get directional antennas to really boost it. If you needed internet and it was an option, LTE is certainly doable and may be as simple as an antenna on the house.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2019
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  20. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Ah, cool. Yes, I've read about these kinds of services, known as WISPs (wireless internet service providers) who offer home internet over 4G LTE. $80 for the kind of service you're getting isn't bad. I mean, it's obviously more than the $40-50 you'd pay for that level of service via cable/fiber/DSL, but if those options aren't available, it's nice to have an option like UbiFi.
     
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