hdtv tivo on a boat

Discussion in 'DirecTV TiVo Powered PVRs & Receivers' started by boatguy, Mar 19, 2004.

  1. boatguy

    boatguy New Member

    21
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    like many of you i pre-ordered and am waiting for the hdtv tivo. i'm new to tivo(have a couple of replaytv units) and have installed a kvh gyro dish and a jvc 26 lcd on a boat we use on weekends during the summer. there will be no power to the unit during the week and no phone line ever(except when i do the set it up at my home). during the weekend it will be powered up and down several times as the batteries/inverter are limited.
    i recently learned that the 110 satellite which carries the bulk of the hd programming was incompatiable with gyro dishes so my hd viewing will be limited to hdnet, hdhbo and hd pay per view
    i understand the units are not out yet and any help you may offer will be based on the existing non-hd versions so my issues are the following :
    1. how long does it take to power up these units from a cold start. i have a zenith 1080 at home and every time it loses power for a time it needs to go through a new channel search and setup. same here?
    2. channel surfing is not so quick on the replaytv's. is it the samewith tivo?
    3. anything else come to mind?
    now that i've learned the limitations of this satellite system, i'm considering a regular direct tivo for limited recording and commercial avoidance and a hi-def receiver to surf and watch the occasional hi def show.
    i appreciate any help or comments.
     
  2. avewill

    avewill New Member

    17
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    Well, I'm pretty new around here, and can only speak to regular definition (not HD) TiVo, but I think your lack of a phone line may pose a problem. It's my understanding that the TiVo needs to call in every week or 2 to download the latest schedule info. Other users here will probably be able to confirm/deny that.
     
  3. bigpuma

    bigpuma Well-Known Member

    7,589
    34
    Aug 12, 2003
    Morgan Hill, CA
    That is not true of the DirecTV tivos, they obtain guide data from the satelite directly. Assuming the HD direcTivos are the same that shouldn't be a problem.

    1. They seem to come on within a minute or two if I power off my directivos. I am not sure if it would be affected by being off for so long. Mine are never off more than a few minutes at a time.
    2. Channel changing is very fast because it is a combo receiver and tivo. Since you don't have to wait for the IR transmitter to change the channel it is the same as using a regular receiver without tivo.

    I hope that helps.
     
  4. jdk

    jdk New Member

    499
    0
    Mar 15, 2001
    San Jose, CA
    Can your gyro dish see two satellites at once? I thought these systems usually only pointed at one location at a time - but I really haven't looked into them that much - the yacht is on backorder ;)

    If you can get both 101 and 119 at the same time, then you should be good-to-go with the HD channels you mentioned, as well as CBS-HD, if you're eligible for it.

    As long as you get the HD-Tivo set up and working at home with a phone line, it should work OK after that. A phone line is required for initial setup, but not after that. You will get daily nag screens after 30 days of not being plugged into the phone line, but once you clear the message, the box works just fine.

    Tivo's aren't too speedy upon boot. There's a long initialization sequence, and _then_ it has to go through its satellite data download phase. There's no human interaction required - its all done automatically, but you do have to wait.

    I believe the general consensus is that die-hard channel surfers won't be pleased with a DirecTivo. Its not _that_ slow, but if you're the type to flip-flip-flip-flip to see what's on 4 different channels, you'll have to click-wait-click-wait-... The general response on these boards is "you don't need to channel surf anyway". Coming from an original generic RCA DirecTV box, and then UltimateTV, I find the DirecTivo to be too slow in channel changes, but its something that's less important with DVR functionality. But I'm sure it'll be quicker than what you're used to, if you've been using ReplayTV-IR Blaster-DirecTV Box combo.
     
  5. bigpuma

    bigpuma Well-Known Member

    7,589
    34
    Aug 12, 2003
    Morgan Hill, CA
    If your boat will be located within 30 - 40 miles of the television towers, you could get the zenith silver sensor antenae and probably pull in local HD stations. It is a fairly small indoor UHF indoor antenae that is supposed to have great range. All of the HD receivers will also work for OTA HD signals including the new HDTivo.
     
  6. JimSpence

    JimSpence Just hangin'

    30,899
    35
    Sep 19, 2001
    Binghamton, NY
    But, I believe that HDNET, HBOHD and HD PPV are on the 119 satellite. So how will this work for you? The only HD on 101 is CBS-HD both east and west.
     
  7. boatguy

    boatguy New Member

    21
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    thanks guys, great info. i'm looking forward to joining you tivo-ers. the replaytv's have been great(i've had them since inception of the service) but you're right about the speed and conversion issues.
    fyi, the boat is about 60 miles from the tv towers and on a mooring in constant motion. btw, the dish only can look at one satellite at a time but their web site bulletin claims we can get the limited hd(web page below).

    http://kvh.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/kvh...QikK6h&p_tbl=10&p_id=698&p_created=1071840648
     
  8. dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

    53,293
    1,478
    Dec 3, 2000
    Long...
    The LNB used to receive the 110° satellite signal block-converts the frequencies to a different location than a regular LNB would such that they can be combined with the signal from 119°. The reason they do this is because DirecTV owns licenses for just 3 transponders at 110° but those frequencies overlap with transponders it has licenses for at 119°, and since DirecTV also only has a subset of transponders at 119° block-converting the 110° frequencies to space DirecTV doesn't own at 119° allows them to avoid having to use multiswitches capable of selecting 5 different satellite inputs. That's probably why the KVH antenna isn't compatible -- when pointed at 110°, the signals would be in the wrong frequencies, and that wouldn't match up correctly with channel information stored on the receiver.

    But it looks like you're OK for everything else.
     
  9. Darin

    Darin Way Left

    1,995
    0
    Dec 26, 2001
    Atlanta, GA...
    You need a second gyro dish. :D Swap out the LNB with a sat-C LNB, and put in a multiswitch and high frequency signal splitter so it's only mixed with with the output from the other dish when it's pointed at 119, and WALLA!!
     
  10. boatguy

    boatguy New Member

    21
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    very interesting doug. this is speculative but since you seem to be on the cutting edge, any idea of whether the new dtv 7s satellite being launched will change things for us "one satellite at a time" folk?
    also, what about hd on dish or voom if i really run out of things to do?
     
  11. dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

    53,293
    1,478
    Dec 3, 2000
    Long...
    DirecTV 7S is going to provide spot beams for local markets now at 110° and 119° instead of local markets being on continental US transponders; I suppose if you're getting any of those local markets, there's a good chance you no longer will be able to.

    Otherwise, no effect, except possibly to move some programming that is to be delivered nationally over to 101°. I don't think there's been any clear statement if DirecTV 7S will be used configured for 100% spot beams on all transponders or if there'll still be some continental transponders in use.
     
  12. Darin

    Darin Way Left

    1,995
    0
    Dec 26, 2001
    Atlanta, GA...
    It should certainly still be using some conus transponders... there are several things at 119 that need to remain conus, like para todos, some HD, and a few national SD channels. There's no reason for spots to require all 11 transponders they own at 119. Dan Collins has reported that the conus transponders are higher power than what they've been using in the past, which would be ideal for HD since that may enable them to use less FEC, and possibly have to re-compress less (or not at all).

    IIRC, the last time I did a guestimate of what 7s would do, by the time you moved all of 119's conus LILs over to spots, and consumed some conus transponders for the slots, the net result would be one, or MAYBE two additional conus slots at 119. Quite a few more should be freed up at 101. So the good news for someone with a single gyro dish is that all additional capacity should be seen at 119 and 101.
     
  13. willardcpa

    willardcpa QUASI-OMNISCIENT

    2,686
    0
    Feb 23, 2001
    Eugene, OR USA
    Where's "constant motion"??:D
     
  14. jdk

    jdk New Member

    499
    0
    Mar 15, 2001
    San Jose, CA
    If you're looking for the most HD from one orbital slot, then VOOM is the way to go. All their programming comes from the 61 degree slot, plus they currently are the HD leader in programming options. If this boat is on the East Cost, it will have no problems picking up signals from the VOOM satellite. On the west coast - as long as you're just off shore, you should be OK. If you're moored in a West coast harbor, then there might be something blocking your LOS to VOOM.

    Thinking some more - you mentioned that this box will remain off most of the time, and powered up for just for viewing. I feel the big advantage to PVRs is their ability to always be on, recording stuff for you such that its waiting for you when you sit down. You won't have that advatage with a "battery powered Tivo", right? Of course, if money is no object, then an HD Tivo is the way to go, but you might consider saving $600 and just getting a regular HD receiver...
     
  15. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

    7,268
    757
    Oct 30, 2003
    Hartford-...
    You watch too mcuh tv. You could TiVo it @ home, and save a lot of $$$$!!!
     
  16. boatguy

    boatguy New Member

    21
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    wow! thanks. it's great to get intelligent responses and logical explanations(for the most part). the gyro satellite people really didn't have a clue.
    if the hd tivo get's here in the next 60 days or so, it'll go in. it's good to know it probably won't require a land line (voom supposedly does). i guess i'll have to suffer through the boot up and slow surfing(kidding of course). at the end of summer it'll go into the home system.
     
  17. Skankboy

    Skankboy Member

    57
    0
    Nov 20, 2002
  18. weldon

    weldon Member

    381
    0
    Jun 17, 2001
    Highlands...
    If you did do the vehicle afadavit thing for Distant Networks, I believe you would have to pay for the programming twice instead of the $4.99 mirror fee for the second receiver.
     
  19. kosh

    kosh New Member

    31
    0
    Jan 26, 2004
    I have a question for you? If the unit is going to be powered off
    most of the time then you won't be able to record anything.
    Why do you need a tivo, let alone an HDTivo? Just curious.
     
  20. boatguy

    boatguy New Member

    21
    0
    Mar 19, 2004
    good question kosh. i'm trying to sort it out myself. i figure i'd like a high def tuner since i receive some high def over direct tv and have a hd tv. it'll also be nice to have some stored hd programming on the tivo to show off to my fellow boaters. even when i'm watching programs at home near the broadcast time, i always wait a bit to watch them on replay to skip commercials so i could do the same with this. i can keep unit on some time during the w/e if there's something worth recording.
    the truth is i don't watch much tv at home or on the boat but i don't see any downside in having a dialed-in system just in case.
    i think i need one!
     

Share This Page