HBO going all HD all 26

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by A-1, Jun 14, 2007.

  1. A-1

    A-1 New Member

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    Mar 12, 2007
    Chicago
  2. TexasGrillChef

    TexasGrillChef New Member

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    Just depends on customer demans, & local capability.
     
  3. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    I don't see a real need for all 26 in every market (especially given the East/West stuff), but each of the 26 will be needed in some markets.
     
  4. dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

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    So HBO will have 26 HD channels; and DirecTV only plans to carry 10 of them.

    Typical.
     
  5. drew2k

    drew2k Drew != Drawn

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    For now, at least.

    The thinking is that with only one of the new satellites going up this year, DirecTV will match in HD each of their current SD HBO offerings. Then when the second new sat goes up next spring, they'll have extra capacity to expand to more HBO channels that currently aren't even offered in SD.
     
  6. hdhdliving

    hdhdliving New Member

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    Chagrin...
    Isn't HBO owned by TW? The only movies they ever show(at least that I notice) are WB pictures. So if that is the case it could be possible that with their intended move to SDV this would fit right in with them competing against DTV and their "Up To 150" HD channels.
     
  7. Amnesia

    Amnesia The Question

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    They certainly show movies from other studios.
     
  8. wdave

    wdave New Member

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    Verizon Fios TV probably will. They have plenty of bandwidth.
    This may actually get me to subscribe to HBO, something I thought I'd never do.
     
  9. dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

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    At some point isn't all this becoming a bit laughable? I mean 26 channels from HBO... How much unique content does that really represent each month? It would seem the real answer is to make all the HBO content accessible on-demand. Considering the technology needed by cable systems to carry all these channels essentially means switched digital video is implemented anyway, why bother with channels that follow some arbitrary schedule... just make it all on demand.
     
  10. drew00001

    drew00001 New Member

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    I can't wait. Hopefully, Comcast will pick up a few more. They currently only have one HBOHD in Seattle . . . OK, I gues it's 2 because of Skinimax.

    I get the HBO lineup solely for HBOHD, and will continue to get such if they add a few more HD channels - even after the $7.99 price expires for me in about 4 months.
     
  11. hdhdliving

    hdhdliving New Member

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    Chagrin...
    Yes, I know but that really wasn't my point. My point was that they are owned by TW.

    I think the vast majority of what they show, at least on their main channel is WB studios, but that's another topic. :)
     
  12. hdhdliving

    hdhdliving New Member

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    Chagrin...
    +1

    It's overkill, specially since they really just seem to trade movies from one channel to the other. I never watch my other HBO channels, just the main one.
     
  13. Amnesia

    Amnesia The Question

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    I rarely do as well, but one big reason is that only the main one is in HD.

    I get four movie channels in HD (HBO, MAX, SHO, Starz) and over a dozen other premium movie channels, but since I got my HDTV, my non-HD movie watching has shrunk to almost nothing...

    (on cable, that is. I still watch non-HD DVDs on one of my upscaling hi-def players)
     
  14. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    Yes, mine too, but y'know, I still canceled HBO and SHO yesterday. We did a try-out for Netflix (and actually got a film that neither HBO or SHO offered, but one that was on Starz instead), and y'know, it was great. It wasn't HD, but I couldn't really tell the difference. It was clearer than last week's Studio 60 on NBC HD. 480p is underrated I think, and getting films (and HBO and SHO original series) through Netflix may be a real winner for us.
     
  15. HDTiVo

    HDTiVo Not so Senior Member

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    You must be consulting for Comcast. ;)
     
  16. infinitespecter

    infinitespecter Member

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    I'm curious... what kind of a TV are you watching this on, and from what distance? The reason I ask is because I can't even watch SD-DVDs anymore because they look so bad in comparison to both HDTV and BluRay on my 32" LCD from about 6 feet. Even upconverted, there is a massive difference between the worst HD and the best DVD, to my eyes.
     
  17. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    It's a 50" Samsung DLP. The Sopranos DVDs we've been watching appear far better than Studio 60 was off of NBC HD last week. There is sometimes a significant difference, but the DVDs are so convenient on so many levels that it more than makes up for that marginal distinction.
     
  18. mike_camden

    mike_camden New Member

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    I think one of the other advantages of DVD over the compressed HD we get from cable/satellite can be consistency. I'm watching on a 50" 1080p LCoS Sony display. Some of our HD channels delivered via COmcast are pretty good (especially those out of Pittsburgh and the cable channels for the most part). With the two local HD channels (also delivered to me via Comcast), consistency is spotty at best. You sometimes see pixelation, tearing and other compression artifacts; we also frequently have audio dropouts. I would prefer a well done and consistent SD DVD over the inconsistency that I often see on these two HD channels (as well as I have less frequently with some of the others). An example of this is TNTHD, which has a reputation for monkey business with its transfers to HD. I was watching a bit of The Replacements this weekend on TNTHD and was surprised that it didn't look much better than what I remembered from my DVD version of the movie, which I hadn't watched in a while. So I popped the SD DVD into my PS (which does 1080p upscaling of SD DVDs) to compare some scenes. I did some A-B comparisons between the two on about 5 or six scenes and found aspects of the SD DVD that I preferred over that of the TNTHD 1080i picture. Sharpness was a little better on the TNTHD, but fast moving scenes showed much more pixelation than that of the SD DVD. Also, the color from the DVD seemed better (my qualitative assessment).

    That being said, I'll take HD from DiscoveryHD, ESPNHD or from BR/HD-DVD over SD DVD any day of the week.
     
  19. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    MAny of the TNTHD movies are just an SD picture zoomed in to fill the screen. They don't even bother to use an HD version. It's pretty obvious when they do this because the picture is so terrible. I hate TNTHD. The channel is a joke. Although the sports they broadcast looks good.
     
  20. bicker

    bicker bUU

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    TNT HD shows movies?

    The whole point of TNT HD for us is its original dramas, The Closer, especially, and we're also looking forward to Saving Grace. As compared to some other HD channels, like all the sports channels, TNT HD actually provides us something interesting to watch over the summer.
     

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