Google is raising the price of YouTube TV to $50

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by skypros, Apr 10, 2019.

  1. randian

    randian Active Member

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    You're right, I don't want more channels, nor do I want faster Internet. 75 megabit+ is more than enough. Give me much better video quality instead.
     
  2. hahathatsfunny

    hahathatsfunny New Member

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    Comcast has Xfinity Instant TV, but as you mentioned you have to be a Comcast customer with at least internet from them. In addition, it only works at your local Comcast address.

    I'm in the Philly market, and I tried Xfinity Instant TV, in my home address where I have internet, on my Roku. However, when I went to my parent's house where they have Fios, and try to logged in on that Roku, I'm unable to watch those same Xfinity channels because it knows I'm not on my local network.

    The nice thing about Xfinity now in the Philly market is that it carries Decades and Escape, two subchannels from WDPN, that Fios doesn't carry.

    *The one exception was that NBC would stream on my parent's Fios network on Xfinity Instant TV. I suppose Comcast owning NBC helped in that situation. And, when I VPN to my company's network (based in Pittsburgh), I'd get the local NBC out of Pittsburgh on Xfinity Instant TV.

    I guess that I'm not hopeful that Xfinity Instant TV or some OTT from Comcast will be available to when not on Comcast internet outside of the home.
     
  3. schatham

    schatham Well-Known Member

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    I think you can use a laptop, tablet or phone to watch outside your home.
     
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  4. randian

    randian Active Member

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    Does Xfinity Instant TV have the same video quality we've come to know and love?
     
  5. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Here's an important distinction that a lot of folks overlook when comparing different live TV services: is the service mainly intended to be watched at home or is it intended to be watched anywhere? Services that are intended to be watched mainly at home are tied to the boxes that the TV provider gives you and/or that provider's broadband service. These providers often give you a mobile app that allows for some viewing options when out of the home but the mobile app typically doesn't offer access to all live channels. This is the case with Xfinity X1, Xfinity Instant TV, DirecTV satellite, etc.

    Services intended to be watched anywhere are delivered via streaming apps that work across all sorts of devices and networks, including mobile devices, and give you full (or nearly full) functionality wherever you are, whether on your home's wifi or out on a cellular network. Such providers include YouTube TV, Hulu with Live TV, etc.

    I'm pretty sure that the provider has to negotiate with cable channels and local broadcast stations to be able to offer out-of-home access to their live channels. Including such access will, of course, require the provider to pay the networks more money per subscriber. If Comcast wanted to, I guess they could have negotiated separate carriage contracts with cable networks for Xfinity Instant TV but they didn't. Instead, it's intended as a "mainly watch at home" TV service. But my guess is that any channel that Comcast owns (e.g. certain NBC affiliates, USA, SyFy, MSNBC, NBCSN, etc.) is made available for live streaming through the Xfinity Stream app when away from home because they can do that since it's their own channel.
     
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  6. hahathatsfunny

    hahathatsfunny New Member

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    I just re-signed up with Xfinity Instant TV and testing trying to watch it on my laptop in a Fios household.

    Message on most of the channels in my $20 basic package (except NBC affiliate):
    Please Connect to Your In-Home WiFi
    Due to licensing agreements, some content can only be viewed on your in-home WiFi.

    Back to my point, it just doesn't seem that Xfinity is really focused on making Anywhere feasible.
    I was looking at it's marketing and I think this is deceptive as well:
    Never miss out on live TV again

    Online
    Just go to xfinity.com/stream to watch on any device, anywhere.

    It's really anywhere in your In-Home Wifi.
     
  7. hahathatsfunny

    hahathatsfunny New Member

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    I agree although I think Dish Network might be different (and most embracing of permitting Anywhere viewing) at least compared to Xfinity and Fios.

    How To Stream Live TV Online & Movies On The Go With DISH Anywhere | DISH

    I don't have Dish Network and can't test it out but perhaps someone else might have an idea. I have tried Fios with the Fios app outside of my home and certain channels like FETV wouldn't work. As Dish carries the channel as well, I wonder if it is different for that channel. The Dish link does state "Take 100% of your LIVE TV"
     
  8. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I specifically omitted Dish from the MVPDs I mentioned before because I was thinking that their contracts DO allow their viewers to watch all of their live channels anywhere. But they're an outlier, I believe. That said, over time, as big MVPDs renegotiate their carriage contracts with the network owners, I imagine that they're gradually including anywhere-access to the live channels as part of the standard package. That might be a "freebie" that the network owners are throwing in as a partial justification for the increase in carriage prices they're asking every time they come to the negotiating table.
     
  9. hahathatsfunny

    hahathatsfunny New Member

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    Perhaps. However, I feel the opposite that there won't be a gradual including of anywhere access, at least with the providers I'm familiar Xfinity and Fios, and specifically with the channels that I care about - local channels within the market mostly, but time will tell. Maybe it will happen as a new launched product.

    I do wonder if Dish obtained contracts with every small independent station (that likely elected must-carry) for anywhere,. If it wasn't difficult, I don't know how Comcast would not be able to. Maybe Dish's technology of permitting anywhere is the key difference - with reliance on the set top box receiver than just a pure stream to the customer. I read that AirTV is based on Dish's concept of anywhere.

    Just an edit to my previous post. In addition to the NBC affiliate, the Telemundo affiliate, CSPAN and the Music Choice channels are available out of home WiFi on Xfinity Instant TV. There might be more, but most of the local stations and channels in general are not available.

    With CBS, it has CBS All Access where at least the local CBS owned and operated stations can be streamed anywhere (well, anywhere within the local market). As CBS is monetizing it directly, it likely sets a premium cost when other carriers want to stream their network affiliate. Comcast would likely have to pay more money in for the offering CBS anywhere access, and might be reluctant. It's one major broadcast network not on Dish's Sling as well likely because of some unusual high cost for what Sling thinks its worth.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2019
  10. schatham

    schatham Well-Known Member

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    It needs initial authorization at your home connection, then it will work. At least the phone will, maybe a laptop.
     
  11. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I forgot about the fact that Dish bought Sling (the TV-anywhere technology that preceded "Sling TV," which is a skinny OTT TV service) and then incorporated that technology into their satellite STBs. So Dish probably does NOT have "watch anywhere" rights with all the various network owners. Maybe they do for some but for others they're simply using the internet-connected satellite STB as a gateway that "slings" the live and recorded TV out to the Dish TV app on your phone, tablet or laptop wherever in the world it is connected to the internet.
     
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  12. hahathatsfunny

    hahathatsfunny New Member

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    Not sure what you mean by "initial authorization."

    But, I used home connection, and I was able to watch WDPN, a local MeTV affiliate station on Xfinity Stream my laptop. This was an attempt to establish initial authorization.

    Then, I took my laptop away from home connection on to another WiFi, tried again with that same station, and got the please connect to your In Home Wifi message.

    --
    I also verified the quirk I remember from before. The interesting thing about Xfinity Stream with VPN to a network outside your local market, you might get another NBC affiliate to stream:

    On my work laptop when I VPN into my work network (based in Pittsburgh) even though I'm in Philadelphia, then open Xfinity Stream, it shows the same guide. It shows the WCAU schedule, but when I click on any program for WCAU it takes me to WPXI programming. e.g. At 11am, I expected NBC 10 news but got Wendy Williams from WPXI.
     
  13. quackman

    quackman New Member

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    Bye bye Comcast cable and Tivo. I'm going all in on YouTube TV. I've been testing it for a couple of weeks and I really like it. The video quality on my Apple TV is so much better than cable. I will miss Tivo, but not Comcast. We'll see how it goes.....the great thing is it will be easy to switch back if I want. No contracts!
     
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  14. Anotherpyr

    Anotherpyr Active Member

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    Xfinity has so much compression that compressed streams often look better.

    Personally I have decided to not pay for television content any longer. If I get it for the same price as internet alone, then I’ll take it otherwise I’ll pass. It’s worse than the old one song on a CD full of crap model the music industry had. Now you get one show on a set of ten channels of crap that is over 50% advertisement. Sorry, if you’re getting that much advertising money, you don’t need mine.
     
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  15. mschnebly

    mschnebly Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly what I did. There is something about knowing you can switch back and forth that just feels good. Or as NashGuy might say... "diggin' the feelz" :p
     
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  16. ncted

    ncted A leaf on the wind

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    Dish Anywhere (using SlingBox tech) works pretty well for out of home streaming. It isn't 100% perfect though. It seems to work best with the Amazon Fire [TV, stick, box, etc.] and mobile devices (iOS and Android). The PC/Mac-based clients seem somewhat unreliable in my experience.

    It will also allow you to download recorded content to your iOS and Android device like Tivo Stream does, but it has to transcode the recording first. It is not on-the-fly like the Stream.
     
  17. TIVO_GUY_HERE

    TIVO_GUY_HERE I miss the ocean

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    I am thinking of getting YTTV. I am so tired of Spectrum cable. I've been having issues with 'tileing' for 3 weeks now, and 6 tech visits later, it's worse than ever. And the are out here at least 3 times a year for same reason. I have 2 premieres that have OTA, and I am 4 miles from the HD towers ... as the crow flies, so on those tv's the picture is actually better than cable. My only reason for not cutting sooner, is not getting my Texas Rangers but YTTV has that, and every other channel ( well most) that I watch, and I have other ways to get the ones I am missing. Savings isn't much, but it's become that, that isn't even the issue anymore, maybe about 45.00 a month. YTTV is on Roku, and I have 2 of those so I will have access to them on my big TV's.

    Just trying the free week now, to see if I really like it.
     
  18. Joe01880

    Joe01880 I love my TiVo

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    With YouTube raising prices that's a sign business is good for YouTube. If prices were to go down that'd be a sign business is bad or YouTube is moving the product (selling off TV). I predict prices ain't coming back down...... ever!

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
     
  19. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    I'd say you're right. And frankly, it wouldn't surprise me one bit (I actually kind of expect it) to see YouTube TV add four of the most popular channels they're missing -- Hallmark Channel, A&E, History, and Lifetime -- and then raise the price again to $55 (or maybe $53). If they can resist it, I don't think they'll ever add Viacom channels, which is the only other major group they're missing, although once Viacom merges with CBS, that may become unavoidable. If that happens, then I'd expect to see Google try to structure an optional add-on tier with most of the Viacom channels and maybe a few of the ones currently in the main tier if they can negotiate that.

    At any rate, Verizon is about to start selling YouTube TV to their own FiOS broadband and Verizon Wireless customers with unified billing and some kind of special bundling perk (my guess would be a free Apple TV 4K or free Android TV 4K HDR streaming box kinda like this one from Sling TV, except customized for YouTube TV instead). Given the cost of FiOS TV and equipment rentals, I expect a lot of their customers to flock to YouTube TV. Unlike PS Vue or Fubo TV, I expect YouTube TV to be a long-term survivor of the coming cable wars.
     
  20. randian

    randian Active Member

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    I've read complaints that the YTTV DVR will "record" a stream containing unskippable commercials. Is that still true? Also, how good is the quality of the DVR stream compared to the live stream? I dropped DirecTV Now because while reviewers all raved about the quality, they apparently never bothered to look at what you get out of the DVR. If they had, they would have discovered the DVR had about 1/3 the video bit rate of the live stream (as bad or worse than Comcast) and about 1/4 the audio bit rate. It was junk, and since I never, ever watch television live that was unacceptable. That unacceptability was compounded by the all-too-frequent tendency of the DVR to give you truncated streams. A one hour show would, for example, be 38 minutes of video, truncated at both ends. A passive-aggressive incentive to watch live? Whatever the reason, losing video when you are not subject to the vagaries of terrestrial radio transmission is astonishing. Fast forward and rewind on my Apple TV were sketchy too, making commercial skipping an exercise in frustration.
     

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