Free space - How much have I got left?

Discussion in 'DirecTV TiVo Powered PVRs & Receivers' started by solan, Oct 9, 2007.

  1. solan

    solan New Member

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    Oct 9, 2007
    Hello - I'm brand new here in the forums. I've had my Series 2 Phillips for 3 years and no problems...until now. I've had that pesky "partial episode" issue for about a week. It seems to be directly related to a drive that is almost full. So I'm wondering how do I tell how much free space I have left? I can't find the option anywhere. Please help a newbie. Thanks!
     
  2. litzdog911

    litzdog911 TechKnow Guide

    12,027
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    Oct 18, 2002
    Mill Creek,...
    There is no "free space indicator" on the Tivo DVRs. You can get a rough guestimate by adding up the total recording time for your "Tivo Suggestion" recordings ... those are the first recordings to be deleted when space is required by your own Season Passes.
     
  3. TonyTheTiger

    TonyTheTiger Pro Troll Magnet

    14,192
    513
    Dec 22, 2006
    Also, a "pesky partial episode issue" will not be the result of a full hard drive. Your TiVo will simply delete suggestions and then previous unprotected recordings in favor of the newly requested program. Unless everything is set to "Keep Forever", you should never normally get a partial episode.
     
  4. Pt121

    Pt121 New Member

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    Mar 26, 2006
    The only way I've experienced a Partial is from a reboot or Sat interuption or someone has accidently stopped the recording.

    Patrick
     
  5. Dkerr24

    Dkerr24 Lost in Big Bend

    2,450
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    Oct 28, 2004
    Okla, USA
    Here's a tip:

    1) Change your DTivo to allow it to record suggestions.
    2) Let it record a few suggestions - say 5, then turn back off that feature.
    3) The Tivo software will always delete suggestions first if you run out of drive space.
    4) Watch the Suggestions folder in your Now Playing List; as soon as that number drops below 5, you are running out of space and the Tivo is looking for things to delete.

    Of course, you could always swap out the hard drive for a 300gb+ hard drive. I've never ran out of space on my 300gb DTivo.
     
  6. mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

    4,763
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    Feb 2, 2006
    Ellicott...
    Here's the scientific method for determining how much space is left on a Tivo drive:

    1. Get yourself an atomic scale
    2. Take the drive out of your Tivo and weigh it. Note: You'll need to know the weight of a blank drive for comparison purposes.
    3. Calculate the difference between your drive and the blank one.
    4. Calculate the weight of a full drive based on the capacity of the drive using 1 microgram for a "1". Remember to use 1024 instead of 1000 for a kilobit so your results are accurate. Don't worry about calculating the "0's" because they weigh nothing.
    5. Subtract the weight of the blank drive from the full drive value you just calculated to see what the capacity of the platter is. This is the value you'll use to determine the actual capacity.
    5. Now take the difference between the full drive and your drive to see how much capacity remains. Divide the remaining value by 8GB/hr to see how many hours you have left.

    This is the truly scientific method. ;)

    PS: To always know the remaining capacity of your drive, you can mount the drive external to the Tivo and keep it on the scale. Make up a conversion chart based on incremental weights of the platter at varying capacities to determine the remaining capacity at a glance. You can also set a trip point on the scale to alert you when the drive is reaching maximum capacity. An audible alarm, such as a police or air raid siren, is highly recommended for this purpose. After all, we all need to know when our Tivos are getting too full. :D
     
  7. rbtravis

    rbtravis New Member

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    Aug 9, 2005
    Parker, Co....
    How is your health coverage. You must pay questioners health coverage due to the extreme injury you caused by pulling so hard on his leg. :rolleyes:
     
  8. chuckg

    chuckg New Member

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    Aug 31, 2007
    Berkeley
    Werner Karl Heisenberg (December 5, 1901 – February 1, 1976)

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle
     

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