For All Mankind Apple TV + SPOILERS

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Gunnyman, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    Agree. And really Ed should not be going back up either. Plus they are obviously going to show (because it's TV after all) that they got their "Stevens'" backwards and that Gordo is going to turn out more fit than his ex. But as it stands, Gordo shouldn't be going back either
     
  2. Win Joy Jr

    Win Joy Jr Well-Known Member

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    I have to keep telling myself “It’s a fictionalization account of an alternate history”.

    Ed punching out would have required a grounding for a Heath evaluation that would have had him removed from the first flight of Pathfinder (Is that the vehicle name?).

    As far as having spare hardware laying around? That’s how they did Apollo/Soyuz in the first place. Ever been to the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum on the National Mall? The Skylab they have on display was the flight backup hardware.

    I was literally screaming about the “giving them the tour”. Part of training would be on ground based mock-ups. I had the opportunity a few years ago of visiting the ISS training facility at JSC.

    And the new engineer in the gallery of the Flight Control Room? Been there, done that.
     
  3. wprager

    wprager Well-Known Member

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    I was not suggesting that Tracy would be sent back. No, she would still be doing her schmoozing with Johnny and Ed, and I suppose put her on "KP" or other unglamorous (but not safety-conscious) details. But to keep her flying? Not until she submits to (and passes) a daily urine and breathalyzer test.
     
  4. JYoung

    JYoung Series 3

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    Do they even have the capability on base to do that kind of testing?
    I mean we're still talking circa 1979 or so.
    The type of machinery for that testing was fairly heavy.
    (I may have been involved in moving some of those machines.)
     
  5. Random User 7

    Random User 7 Incognito

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    Yes, it’s basically just a piece of paper like a litmus test. The Russians invented it in this reality.
     
  6. wprager

    wprager Well-Known Member

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    Aren't they now in the early 80s?

    EDIT: Yep, 1983: Timeline
     
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  7. wprager

    wprager Well-Known Member

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    Plus the standard walk-a-line, touch-fingertip-to-nose would do in a pinch :)
     
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  8. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    Is that possible in zero gravity? :)

    I'm kidding, I know that inside the ship there's "gravity"
     
  9. JYoung

    JYoung Series 3

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    Back in that time, that was true for spot qualitative (Positive/negative) urine tests.
    Mostly used in pregnancy tests and quick urine analysis basic chemical type tests.

    Quantitative (how much) testing for drugs (or even other things, such as normal body chemistry, hormone levels, or antibody levels) in blood or urine required larger testing machines for analysis.

    These machines were at minimum, good size counter top units with several being large stand alone machines.

    (My first after school job involved prepping specimens for these machines and I had to supervise collections for law enforcement and job applications more than once.)

    So, "your urine tested positive for alcohol" isn't enough as they could say, "i just had one drink but I wasn't drunk."

    Which why prosecutors get tests that have blood alcohol levels.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2021
  10. wprager

    wprager Well-Known Member

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    It's not zero.
     
  11. wprager

    wprager Well-Known Member

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    There's gravity on the moon.
     
  12. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    It was a joke, son :)
     
  13. PJO1966

    PJO1966 Hi. What is this?

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    Yes, gravity on the moon. There just appears to be MORE gravity when they're inside the base. :confused:
     
  14. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

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    They occasionally try, but it's hard to accurately simulate low-gravity for more than a few moments...
     
  15. ej42137

    ej42137 Well-Known Member

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    Your remark confused me until I realized you're calling the base a "ship". Remember when the Eagle landed and became Tranquility Base?
     
  16. PJO1966

    PJO1966 Hi. What is this?

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    Watch "Away". They managed it in the moon sleeves very well. In the Expanse they at least make liquids pour slower when on Luna. It's doable. They just choose not to bother.
     
  17. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    And I was completely joking!!
     
  18. Saturn_V

    Saturn_V Now with flavor!

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    Hard to do wire work in a practical conventionally lit set. The Expanse does it and it's not altogether convincing. (Alex Kamal and the zero g beer scene)

    I'm betting all the lunar surface shots are wire-assisted to simulate the 1/6 G.
     
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  19. kaszeta

    kaszeta $nullstring TCF Club

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    Yeah, walking through the Base should actually look a lot like walking on the surface: normal walking is difficult since you tend to "bound" a lot. A lot of the real astronauts, particularly Harrison Schmidt, mentioned that normal walking was really, really hard unless you were carrying something heavy to hold you down, usually it was the bounding hops like they show. But hard to film this.
     
  20. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    *Spoilers for 3/26/2021 episode*

    I liked this episode a lot. Stayed away from MOST of the melodrama (except for the lesbian woman declaring to her husband that she needs to divorce him to get back with her old lover, and Gordo meeting with ex-wife's husband and telling him that he's going to win her back). I liked the interplay between the Russians and Americans and there was definitely a tenseness about it. Loved how the two leads from both groups met at the bar and figured out how to make docking work without upsetting either side. I don't recall how it was done originally, but I'd bet it was similar.
     

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