Ethernet and MoCA possible?

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by Bobby Mac, Sep 20, 2020.

  1. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    Yes. Will check

     
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  2. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    it’s almost backwards. It is 90-98 every time on WIFI. I ran it wired 4 times, I got 42, 92, 32.8, and 52.

    I know Ethernet is good until 300 ft. Does the extra 10 ft cord coming after the AP to the laptop (or TiVo) cause that much of an issue 310 FG? Or do you think it’s an AP setting?


     

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  3. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    This is the 300ft Cat7 run, correct?

    Yeah, that seems off. Have you tried replacing the AP with a simple Gigabit Ethernet switch, strictly as a test?

    As suggested earlier, the switches should allow extending the network, so long as individual Cat* runs are under 328ft.

    Have to wonder if there’s something wrong with the AP, one of the cables or the terminations. Though I’d start by trying a different 10ft cable between the laptop and AP, given the crazily lower rates for the wired connection.

    edit: p.s. Until you can get a solid rate between the AP and main router via the wired test, I wouldn’t yet worry about my comments Re: TiVo issues with “green” switches and IGMP Snooping (unless you need a diversion).
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
  4. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Not impossible. That’s where temporarily supplanting the AP with a GigE switch could provide some insight.

    Brand & model info on all your Ethernet gear would be helpful.
     
  5. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    Or... plug the 300ft Cat7 run directly into the laptop’s Ethernet port, rather than the AP (taking the AP temporarily out of the equation).

    Separately, you’ll want to test the laptop via a direct Ethernet connection to a LAN port on your main router, as a baseline.
     
  6. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    Sep 10, 2019
    Main router and AP

    I have another secondary router that is not in this picture at all. It goes from the main router to my second floor. (Nighthawk). I have a few switches off of that which run a lot of devices. One is an 8 port unmanaged. As much of a pain as it will be, I can pull it and use it to test.
    Also I checked the ASUS (AP) and the “Enable IGMP Snooping“ is dropped down on “disabled”
     

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  7. snerd

    snerd Well-Known Member

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    Just to clarify, what I'm now suggesting for better bandwidth having the RG11 connect from the NETWORK port of a MoCA adapter in the house to the NETWORK port of the MoCA adapter in the barn. Then use ethernet cables to make the appropriate connections from the MoCA adapters to the routers on each end. This configuration would not require any splitters for the MoCA network.

    For coax in the house, the POLE connection would feed the input of the 3-way splitters, with outputs to the modem, Roamio and tuning adapter. No diplexer involved.
     
  8. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    Wow. So before checking with a switch I did what you said. Just bypassed the AP and ran the line directly to the laptop.
    Must say... very surprised. Tested 3 times at 8MBPS. So basically I’m losing 98% signal at the end of the run, but the AP is acting like an amplifier. No wonder my TIVO doesn’t work.
     
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  9. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    And you’d recommend the two 2.5s?

     
  10. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    The “go coax”?


     
  11. snerd

    snerd Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably use the goCoax 2.5s, but check out krkaufman's link if you want to explore other alternatives. If 400Mbps is all you're shooting for, any MoCA 2.0 or MoCA 2.5 adapters should work fine.
     
  12. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    will give it a shot and report the results.


    Thank you both for the help!


     
  13. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    One last question... sorry... just because if I have it, I might as well take advantage of it to the max. But this TV port on the Moca adapter. Is that going to be useless the way I’m setting it up ? (Just left unhooked since I’m still connecting at the end with Ethernet)
     

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  14. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    The goCoax 2.5 adapters are a no-brainer given the performance/price ratio compared to the competition.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2020
  15. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    It depends on how you ultimately setup your adapters. If unused, it’s good practice to cap the port with a 75-ohm terminator.

    The barn won’t have a need for that port, so it could be capped. Not sure how you’ll be connecting the main bridging adapter, so can’t say for sure, there. (e.g. If you install the main adapter at your router location, you could connect the cable modem to the MoCA adapter’s TV out port.)

    I’d recommend another swipe at the diagram with the MoCA solution as the object.
     
  16. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    I’d still be curious what you find performing this same hard-wired test with the laptop wired to a LAN port on your main router (and perhaps connected to the Nighthawk, as well).
     
  17. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    :thumbs up:

    The common approach would be to install your main MoCA adapter right at your main modem/router location, connecting the wall coax to the goCoax’s “MoCA” port, then connecting the goCoax’s “TV” port to the modem’s coax input port; then connect the goCoax’s Ethernet port to a LAN port on your main router.

    The barn wall coax would connect to the “MoCA” port on its adapter, and then connect the adapter’s Ethernet port to the AP, as required to support AP mode, and you should be good.

    Add’l thoughts...
    • Install a “PoE” MoCA filter on the input port of your main 3-way splitter, to secure and strengthen your MoCA network — presuming your MoCA network is setup as described above, with no other variation from your original diagram.
    • If the Tuning Adapter begins acting up once your MoCA network is active, you may need to install a MoCA filter on the TA’s coax input port to protect it from MoCA signals.
    • Cap unused ports w a 75-ohm terminator
    =================

    A simplifying alternative for installation of the main bridging MoCA adapter would be possible IF you had power and Ethernet access at the main 3-way splitter location. If you installed the main adapter there, you could have a direct coax run between the adapters, maximizing their performance and eliminating the addl concerns listed above with adjusting your coax plant for MoCA. (Of course, you could then also right-size the main splitter to a 2-way, since the barn coax run would now connect directly to the main bridging MoCA adapter, rather than the 3-way.)

    This alternative, if possible*, is ideal if you only need MoCA to enable the barn connection (i.e. and nowhere else) and don’t need the raw cable signal delivered to the barn coax. (* Again, this workaround would require Ethernet & power at the main splitter location, so likely moot.)
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2020
  18. snerd

    snerd Well-Known Member

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    The connection that I described isn't the usual way that a MoCA network is set up. That was intentional, because of the 300' distance. A conventional setup with splitters and a MoCA filter would add significant attenuation to the MoCA signals, which might create performance issues. If you decide to set up a conventional MoCA network to distribute the signals to other rooms in the house, I would recommend leaving the 300' RG11 link as a straight shot that is independent of the other coax in the house.

    In a conventional MoCA network, a MoCA filter is attached to the input of the main splitter (fed from the pole) and MoCA devices are all "downstream" from that splitter. With a goCoax or similar adapter, the TV port is a convenient place to attach a modem or tuning adapter (but not a TiVo or Mini), or other device that doesn't need the MoCA signals.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2020
  19. Bobby Mac

    Bobby Mac New Member

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    Just thought of something, as it sits if I added the filters,etc (option A)everything remains grounded (grounded prior to entry). If I run the straight shot, is there a way to ground the line as it is ran underground?
     
  20. JLV03

    JLV03 Active Member

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    Dumb question - is it too late to go fiber between the buildings? Fiber would provide very fast speeds and eliminates any grounding and lightning concerns.
     

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