Ebert Presents at the Movies

Discussion in 'Season Pass Alerts' started by janry, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

    57,108
    13,794
    Oct 17, 2000
    Minneapolis

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    In this day and age?

    You foolish dreamer, you!

    :D
     
  2. fasTLane

    fasTLane Member

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    Nov 25, 2005
    Roger Ebert will be sporting a state of the art chin prosthetic to improve his appearance somewhat. The new voice emulation machine is quite amazing as well.

    Welcome back to TV, Mr. Ebert. Two thumbs way up. :up::up:
     
  3. Schmye Bubbula

    Schmye Bubbula Member

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    I categorically reject the characterizations hurled at me, thinly-veiled as afflicted with some kind of pathological narcissistic personality disorder:
    – I'd wager that Roger Ebert himself would be even more displeased than me with my state's PBS network burying his show on the expensive premium tier, out of reach of regular basic cable & OTA viewers.
    – My monthly cable bill's perennial rate increase crossed to over $100 last month. So you guys think that there's not something just wrong with having to shell-out $150/month to continue getting this beloved, widely-sought show?
    – To the extent that taxpayer-funded subsidies to PBS remain, then, yes, I do experience in some sense a betrayed sense of entitlement, but not as you mean it — as the tantrum of a spoiled brat — but rather as a ripped-off "paying customer."
    – In this market, At the Movies always has been carried in syndication by broadcast stations, available to everyone. If PBS wants to carry it, they should carry it on their regular publicly-available stations.
    — Not doing so belies PBS's (stereotypical) left-media bias as champions of the "the common man," by confining the show to only "the rich."
    — If it's "rudeness" on my part letting PBS know that their grievous choice means that, for cause, my donations won't be forthcoming in the future and I'll be seeking revocation of their government subsidies, then OK, I'm rude... and proud of it!
     
  4. trainman

    trainman Nice to see you

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    Sherman...
    There's a difference between "PBS" and "a PBS member station/network" such as UNC-TV.

    Also, as I said yesterday, this show is not distributed by PBS. It's syndicated by a different organization.
     
  5. Schmye Bubbula

    Schmye Bubbula Member

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    Oct 14, 2004

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    ^ I'm not sure whether trainman's remarks are directed at my previous post, but in North Carolina, the UNC-TV "PBS member network" is controlled by state government. The only public TV station in the state that is not part of UNC-TV is WTVI in Charlotte, which is an independent PBS affiliate operated by the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Broadcasting Authority.

    The UNC-TV "PBS member network" receives direct subsidies from taxpayers (as well as a combination of membership support, corporate and foundation underwriting).
     
  6. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    sunnyvale
    Wait, you pay over $100/month for cable, and all you get is ANALOG cable?

    If you have a cablecard, you almost certainly get whatever channel it's on.. try tuning to it.
     
  7. Schmye Bubbula

    Schmye Bubbula Member

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    Oct 14, 2004
    ^ No, that includes my pokey Road Runner Lite (to which I had to downgrade last year because the regular RR Basic kept going up every year — and this year, by the way, RR Lite costs more than RR Basic just a few years ago... grrrr!); the cable TV part is $65 (Basic Cable, which includes Broadcast Cable). And yes, it's just analog — I have no cable box going into my two Series 2 TiVos (thus no CableCards or Tuning Adapters), only a coax cable.

    Between all the channels I'm slowly-but-surely losing to the premium upper tier (C-SPAN2 was the latest) and this current travesty with Roger Ebert Presents at the Movies, I'm seriously looking into just cutting the cord and going Netflix and pirate BitTorrent.

    TV now is an unmitigated disaster (57 minutes audio — nothing you don't already know but well worth your time). When will Big Media learn the lesson that TheWormyFruit™ taught the recording industry: that people are only happy to pay when they make reasonably-priced à la carte offerings easier & more convenient than piracy? (That's just a rhetorical question.)
     
  8. sieglinde

    sieglinde Active Member

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    Sebastopol, CA
    I reported the D-Bag to the management.
     
  9. Syzygy

    Syzygy New Member

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    Twin Cities, MN
    TCDTV has just posted the following in Minneapolis, MN - OTA - in the Local HDTV Info and Reception forum at AVSForum.

     
  10. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Then that is probably why you can't receive the station. Buy a clue: analog TV is dead. If you don't want to spend the money to upgrade your TVs, then you will at the very least need to fork out for an HD capable DVR like the S3, THD, or S4, or else get a CATV company leased STB or DVR. I cannot guarantee this will allow you to receive the channel in question: into which tier a particular channel falls is a decision made by your local CATV company. Unless the channel is OTA and the station has classified itself as "must carry", then the decision to carry the channel at all is also up to your local CATV company, based in part upon how much the broadcaster wishes to charge the CATV company to carry the channel.

    Some time around 2012, you are probably going to lose them all, but this is not the broadcaster's fault, nor the CATV company's. It's YOURS, for failing to upgrade your equipment. Essentially all OTA transmissions went digital a year ago. The CATV companies will be allowed to convert the rest of their channels circa 2012. Analog video simply wastes far too much bandwidth to continue to be allowed. That, not to mention the vastly advanced features engendered by digital video or its vastly superior quality and general immunity to the most common sources of signal degradation in a transmission media.

    No, it's just an irrelevant rant. Although there is a chance it is not the case, the failure in this instance is almost surely entirely yours.
     
  11. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Oh, gee, everybody. Schmye Bubbula has just sent me a brief two sentence (plus one word) PM accusing me of being a troll.

    I'm exposed! Uncovered! Oh how shall I ever bear with the shame? [/sarcasm]

    Thanks, SB. I needed a good laugh. :rolleyes:
     
  12. Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

    57,108
    13,794
    Oct 17, 2000
    Minneapolis
    The first step in solving a problem is admitting you have a problem.

    Before you can conquer your trollity, you must accept and embrace your trollity.

    You should be grateful to Schmeye for trying to help you with your problem.

    :D
     
  13. MikeAndrews

    MikeAndrews Registered abuser

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    Jan 17, 2002
    Northern...
    Ebert Presents is fairly clearly set up to also be syndicated for commercial stations.

    "When we get back..." (after what?) and the show is about 24 minutes long to allow for commercials.
     
  14. djwilso

    djwilso Member

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    Phoenix, AZ
    Not sure why you think you have the right to talk to anyone like that in a business correspondence. What a tool.
     
  15. sieglinde

    sieglinde Active Member

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    Aug 11, 2002
    Sebastopol, CA
    Upgrade my equipment!!!! I have a working TV that cost me $500. I am going to wear it out. Actually it is irrelavant because my HD Tivo works fine with it and my Tivo 2 works fine with a cable box.
     
  16. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Well, I have a 20 year old NTSC CRT monitor that cost much less than that, and I am still using it. It's hanging off the back of a TiVo HD, however.
     
  17. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    sunnyvale
    You're using the wrong terminology. Cable companies _can_ continue analog as long as they want.

    Plus, you say "general immunity to the most common sources of signal degradation". I completely disagree. I would MUCH rather have some snow than have _segments of show missing or digital artifacting_. I had the former happen for the first time in a while a few days ago, and the latter happens a lot (probably a couple times a week at least).

    Don't get me wrong, I finally got cable cards on both of my Tivos (though I would likely use one for clear QAM only *if* Tivos supported manual channel remapping -- and yes, I *am* one who has argued _for_ the cable card requirement *when arguing from Tivo's point of view*..) I do appreciate the *usually* improved picture quality. But really, I liked the ability to split the cable to a zillion devices easier. (I had to add an amplified splitter myself to even GET many of the channels I should get.)
     
  18. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    Where did I suggest otherwise? They will be allowed to drop analog services circa 2012, unless the FCC forces an extension. This probably means most will.

    The statement concerns not what you would rather have, but the susceptibility to various issues. Analog signals tend to degrade with dropping signal levels fairly gracefully. One will first notice some slight amount of snow and grain, followed by ever increasing amounts of snow and grain for a very long time until finally the picture becomes unrecognizable. Digital signals, however, will experience no loss of PQ whatsoever until the levels fall well below the point where most people would find the analog signal to be objectionable, although well above the point most people would consider it to be terrible. Just a short way below this point, the digital signal will quit altogether, with a very narrow region where it is intermittent but not gone entirely. The analog signal, however, will have only just degraded visibly.

    Signal levels, however, are not the only issue impacting signal delivery. Noise and distortion are also significant contributors to signal degradation. At ordinary levels, digital signals are far, far less susceptible to noise than analog signals. Indeed, far beyond the point where most people would find an analog signal very objectionable, a digital signal will still be 100% perfect. Digital signals are more generally more susceptible to distortion than analog signals. Indeed, a relatively small amount of distortion can destroy a digital carrier, but there's a catch. Distortion levels are completely dependant upon signal levels, but not linearly. Specifically, 2nd order distortion increases 2 dB for every dB increase in signal level, and 3rd order distortion increases 3 dB for every 1 dB increase in signal level. Because of Digital's immunity to noise, most CATV companies run their digital signals 10 or in some cases even 15 dB lower than analog carriers. The result is 2nd order carrier / distortion ratios rise by 10 or even 15 dB, and 3rd order carrier / distortion ratios may rise as much as 20 or even 30 dB on an all digital platform. This also means, all else being equal, the plant can also deliver more carriers.

    The bottom line is for a given issue of moderate extent, fewer people will complain of problems on a digital system. Admittedly, the ones who do have issues may well find them to be worse.

    Most people, with most CATV levels, would say they can split the service more times with digital services. Of course, the statement in and of itself has a very subjective component, since what sort of analog PQ is acceptable will vary a lot from individual to individual, not to mention from one receiver to the other. There's a lot less argument about whether a digital signal is acceptable or not, though.

    It's possible you may have an unusual topology with lots of drops a long way from the subscriber tap. This is my situation, for example. With 12 drops, and being moderately far away from the tap, an amplifier was not optional. Most people, however, with 4 or fewer outlets and only a modest distance from the tap should not require an amplifier. It's up to the CATV company to provide decent signal levels to the back of your set in an ordinary setup, and if they are not, then they need to fix their problems.
     
  19. Schmye Bubbula

    Schmye Bubbula Member

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    Oct 14, 2004
    A couple of weeks ago, Ebert Presents at the Movies began streaming the individual reviews every Sunday night each week from the official website.

    - -
    Edit: It's more convenient to go directly to the Episodes webpage here.
     

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