downloading copy protected shows

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by DrNorm, Dec 1, 2016.

  1. lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    John's...

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    What they could have done and what they still could do is allow a copy-protected recording to be moved from one TiVo to another just as they now allow it to be moved to a phone or tablet.

    There is no way they could have allowed copying it. Copy-protected means that only one accessible copy of the recording can exist.
     
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  2. idksmy

    idksmy Guest

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    Jawohl.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  3. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I'm guessing they never bothered because the current design is geared more toward streaming rather then transfer. They probably don't want to put much effort into the transfer stuff.
     
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  4. Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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    Yep. ;)
     
  5. sfhub

    sfhub Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it is actually against the law to copy protect OTA.

    As I recall there was some FCC rule about Broadcast Flag.

    Then there was a lawsuit that FCC exceeded its authority in mandating Broadcast Flag for receiving equipment since their purview was just the transmission of signals, not the receiving equipment specifications.

    There was an attempt to slip the Broadcast Flag into legislation, but that legislation ended up not passing.

    Then Windows Media Center ended up implementing support for the Broadcast Flag even though it wasn't required to by any legislation.

    Then FCC eventually just officially dropped the Broadcast Flag into the dust bin when cleaning up obsolete regulation.

    One could argue the efficacy of transmitting in the clear, then relying on a Broadcast Flag to enforce content source's intentions, then forcing all equipment to honor the Broadcast Flag on the receiving devices, but as I understand it, it isn't against the law to copy protect. Is is just a moot issue, because there is no current equipment (not withstanding old equipment that might be stuck on old interepretations of the FCC) that will honor the Broadcast Flag today.

    I only bring this up because if some broadcaster/content provider was to revisit Broadcast Flag and, on their own, convince the hardware manufacturers to honor the Broadcast Flag (highly unlikely), then you couldn't point to legislation that said this was against the law.

    I vaguely recall at some point some broadcasters were setting the Broadcast Flag incorrectly and TiVo mapped this into one of its CCI modes. There might have been some thread about that back in the day.

    Maybe I'm wrong. Does anybody know of legislation that specifically makes it against the law to copy protect OTA broadcasts?
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  6. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    The "law" I'm referring to prevents cable companies from protecting broadcast channels. I don't think it's an actual law though, I thnk it's just an FCC regulation.
     
  7. sfhub

    sfhub Well-Known Member

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    The rule you are thinking of was amended to allow encryption of basic tier in October 2012

    Commission Relaxes The Cable Encryption Prohibition

    The transition requirement was the cable operator had to provide equipment for basic tier free of charge for some period of time if customers requested it.

    The reasoning for changing the old rule was that by 2012 most people either had set top boxes or CableCARDs because systems had gone all digital with the tiers above basic tier being encrypted so the number of people affected by encryption of basic tier would be small, while it would allow easier provisioning by cable operators since they wouldn't need to roll a truck to physically connect/disconnect your cable (or remove/add a blocking device) when you subscribed/unsubscribed.

    So today, there is no rule that basic (including broadcast) tier needs to be in the clear anymore.

    Prior to 2012 cable operators had to request a waiver, which mostly was approved only if they could show significant theft. After 2012, they just needed to adhere to the transition requirements.
     
  8. pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    Encryption != copy protection.

    More precisely, TiVos don't use the fact that a broadcast is encrypted by the Cableco to determine whether to copy protect that broadcast
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2017
  9. sfhub

    sfhub Well-Known Member

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    CCI (and previously also BF) are indicators/mechanisms for Copy Protection.

    Encryption of transmission is mainly to prevent theft of service and to ease provisioning.
     
  10. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Yes and I was referring to the rule that forces cable companies to set the CCI to "copy freely" for all OTA channels they're rebroadcasting
     
  11. lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    Encryption of locals is to force everyone to rent some kind of box to receive them. "Theft of service" is and always was BS,
     
  12. idksmy

    idksmy Guest

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    Yeah, nobody has ever strung coax between apartments or houses.
     
  13. sfhub

    sfhub Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of people use to get CableModem service and get the basic tier for free. One may or many not consider this theft.
     
  14. lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    John's...
    It was never as extensive a problem as they claimed. And if that were the real issue, they would have never had a real reason to charge for DTAs. Just as there is no justifiable reason for the Comcast "Additional Digital Outlet" fee.
     
  15. idksmy

    idksmy Guest

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    Opinion doesn't equal fact.
     
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  16. lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    John's...
    And what "facts" do you have?
     
  17. idksmy

    idksmy Guest

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    I have not made any claims, like you have, in your diatribes.
     
  18. lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    What exactly is your problem? Do you own stock in Comcast or have some other reason for defending them? Are you seriously trying to tell me that the cost of a CableCARD is anywhere near the $89.88/Year that they charge?
     
  19. idksmy

    idksmy Guest

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    They charge what the market will pay. Don't like the price, don't buy it. Simple. There are options.

    Complaining abut it on a discussion forum accomplishes nothing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2017
  20. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    That would be true if there was real competition but in a lot of places the cable company has a functional monopoly, especially over internet access. (DSL is not a viable option if you want to get your TV using OTT apps)
     
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