Cord Cutting NASCAR Fan seeks advice.

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by michael1248, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. michael1248

    michael1248 Member

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    I've got most of it figured out except the NASCAR part...

    I enjoy not only the races but the pre and post race stuff. I've never streamed outside of my TiVo box...

    Looking at the 2019 NASCAR schedule, a lot of the races will be OTA on both FOX and NBC, but I will need a streaming service that has both FS1 and NBCSN for the rest of them. Also, since it takes me a few days to watch the entire race, I will also have to have the ability to use some kind of cloud DVR.

    So far, the most viable option seems to be YouTube TV. But then again, what do I know. Obviously, I have to get a streaming device as well. Since I am have an iPhone and an iPad, I am thinking that Apple TV might work.

    Sure would be nice if TiVo had some of these apps loaded in their boxes!

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    - Sling TV Blue is the most economical option with those channels ($30).
    - DirecTV NOW is a close second ($40).
    - I'd put YouTube TV third ($40) because the rest of their lineup isn't so great as you get far fewer channels than DTVN.

    Apple TV would work fine of course, but is by far the most expensive streamer. Fire TV stick is just a fraction of the cost for about the same level of performance. Roku is cheaper still, but a little slower, especially with DTVN. In fact, you can get a Roku for free from Sling.

    But DTVN might also have your locals, so you wouldn't even need OTA. Check here:
    att_cms_local_channels

    I'm not sure what locals Sling or Youtube offer.

    Whatever you decide, go for the free trials first.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  3. michael1248

    michael1248 Member

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    Thanks so much for taking the time to inform me of so many facts that I was not even aware of!
     
  4. trip1eX

    trip1eX Active Member

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    any streaming service with those channels will work for you. I thought YoutubeTV was the most enjoyable service to use and I have used them all. YMMV.
     
  5. rpj22

    rpj22 Member

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    Do all of those offer the cloud DVR he wanted?
     
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  6. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Additional notes about those options: the Sling Blue package is $25 but you'd spend another $5 to add the cloud DVR feature. Sling's cloud DVR gives you 50 hours of storage. Recordings never automatically expire. But you often cannot FF through ads in recordings from Fox-owned channels, such as FS1.

    DirecTV Now, at $40, includes only 20 hours of cloud DVR storage. Recordings automatically expire after 30 days. But I believe you can FF through ads in any recording from any channel.

    YouTube TV, at $40, has unlimited cloud DVR storage but recordings automatically expire after 9 months. You cannot FF through ads in recordings from CBS-owned channels, but that wouldn't affect your NASCAR recordings since none of it airs on CBS or CBS Sports Network.

    Depending on where you live, DirecTV Now and YouTube TV may include some or all of your main local channels. Sling Blue may offer your local NBC and Fox channels. You'd just have to check each one to see.

    I'm pretty sure that DirecTV Now and YouTube TV stream all of their channels at 60 frames per second (like regular cable and satellite services do). The last I read, though, Sling TV was only streaming some channels, including Fox and FS1, at 60 frames per second, while others, including NBC and NBCSN, were at only 30 frames per second. Fast-moving sports at 30 frames per second tend to look choppy.

    Having read lots of professional and regular user reviews over the past year, I'd say that YouTube TV has a reputation for being the most reliable service while DirecTV Now has a reputation for the best picture quality.
     
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  7. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    I've had DirecTV NOW for a couple of years. It's improving at a glacial pace and has the poorest DVR of the lot. However, its lineup is unmatched. If Youtube TV had anywhere near the same lineup, I'd switch in a heartbeat. But is still has many gaping holes. Dwindling lineup is the same reason I had to drop PlayStation Vue, in spite of its far superior DVR, performance and reliability.

    Another thing to note about DTVN is sound quality. Most channels are DD5.1. And DTVN will probably have a stand-alone Android TV box soon with a full featured remote with all the DVR controls traditional DVR users are accustomed to. I currently have this box, and it's performing very well, nearly at the same level as the DirecTV DVR I had many years ago. By the time the box is released to the public, the service it will run will probably be called AT&T TV.

    I forgot to mention Fubo which is very sports centric. But the lowest cost package with your channels and DVR service would be $50.
     
  8. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    Jeez, and all these limitations make them better than a whole-home Tivo setup with auto comskip, great playback, tons of storage that doesn't expire etc.?? Cost-wise, sure, but damn you're giving up a lot to go cheap.

    Relevant to this thread - do all these services let you pad sports recordings by whatever time you want to account for overruns?
     
  9. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, there are definitely some compromises involved in using these streaming cable-replacement services in lieu of regular cable TV with TiVo. As to whether those trade-offs justify however much $ you might save, well, YMMV (obviously). On the other hand, there may be some things that are actually better by going the streaming route -- for instance, the HD picture quality of DirecTV Now (which I tried for a few months, basically just to score a free Apple TV 4K) blows away Comcast cable TV. And if you do a lot of streaming from Netflix, Amazon, etc. (especially if it's in HDR, which the TiVo Bolt doesn't support), then you may prefer to have your cable TV service on the same box (Apple TV, Roku, etc.) as your non-cable/streaming sources. Lastly, these streaming cable services tend to offer quite a bit of on-demand content (typically with non-skippable ads). Depending on your cable provider, TiVo may not support access to the on-demand content that is part of your subscription.

    Different folks will definitely come to different conclusions about what option they prefer at a given price point. As for me, I don't think any cable TV service -- whether via cable, satellite or streaming -- is worth the cost, because I simply don't find very much compelling content on basic cable channels (but then I'm not a big sports fan). I'm very happy using subscription and free on-demand streaming apps plus free OTA TV to provide more quality viewing choices than I'll ever fully take advantage of.


    That's a good question. Probably varies by service. I don't think DirecTV Now's cloud DVR allows this, at least yet. I've read that, on YouTube TV, Google monitors their live sports score data feed to determine when a game ends and a cloud DVR recording should conclude. It apparently works well.
     
  10. warrenn

    warrenn Active Member

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    Do you have a Smart TV? Many modern TVs have some kind of streaming platform built-in, so you might be able to watch streaming content without a separate device. Often, the built-in platform is pretty basic. It may or may not support the channels you need. If you find you end up watching a lot of streaming content, it will likely be worth not using the TV streaming support and instead getting a separate streaming device for the ease, convenience, and performance.
     
  11. trip1eX

    trip1eX Active Member

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    Oh and you can do free trials of all these services (you can use multiple emails for the same service even ;) ) so you could do quite a bit of testing to see what works for you if any.
     
  12. michael1248

    michael1248 Member

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    I don't have a Smart TV, so I will also be in the market for a separate streaming device.

    Thanks for all the great input. It is really appreciated and will help me with my final decision.

    Question: With the cloud based DVR services, I do get that some don't allow specific programs to be FF'd thru. But I was wondering if, like TiVo, you can start watching a program before it is finished recording?
     
  13. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    I have an Apple TV 4K and really like it. If you're looking to cast content (music, photos, etc.) from your iPhone and iPad to your TV, the Apple TV is a good choice. It will also let you take advantage of other Apple content/services on your TV, if that's important to you: stream your Apple Music subscription, as well as iTunes video rentals/purchases, and play back music and other content saved in the iTunes app on Mac or Windows computers in your home.

    Now, all that said, if none of that is important to you, you might take a look at Roku and Fire TV devices, which are much less expensive. I still prefer Apple TV because it has, IMO, a nicer UI that is free of ads. (Also, it's rumored -- although no one knows, really -- that Apple may let Apple TV owners stream their upcoming original video service for free when it debuts in a few months. We'll see.) On the other hand, some folks really hate the Apple TV remote control.

    Apple TV, Roku and Fire TV support pretty much all the same popular streaming apps with one key exception: YouTube TV is not available for Fire TV (due to Amazon and Google's prickly relationship). But Fire TV is good choice for Amazon Prime members who are really tied into Amazon services, content and other Alexa-compatible smart devices around the home.
     

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