Cord cutting a myth?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by mr.unnatural, Oct 21, 2014.

  1. Nov 9, 2014 #321 of 364
    ncted

    ncted A leaf on the wind

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    Not with newer wireless standards (802.11ad for instance) and whitespace spectrum. Of course, the question is what will the cost be?
     
  2. Nov 9, 2014 #322 of 364
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    I finally found the discussion by Diana Collins (and you among others) about the potential of emerging wireless technology, here:
    http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?p=10088096#post10088096
    One should follow it for several pages to get the relevant posts.

    I continue to be optimistic about technology advances, even in dense urban areas.
     
  3. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    That was a different discussion, about linear video delivery over wireless networks, and just as for large-scale wireless internet delivery, I remain very skeptical. I think GPON/xPON fiber and HFC are still going to be the standards to beat a couple decades down the line.

    Hopefully, however, the wireless stuff will work well enough to cover the areas that our political system has failed to cover. I say that because there is no technical reason why we can't cover every residential structure (I use this terminology to include G.Fast in large MDUs where there is GPON FTTB) in the United States that currently has year-round road access and hardwired phone service with either HFC or fiber, it's just a political failure to get the job done. Even in extremely rural areas where HFC is impractical, fiber will get the job done, since it can go over long distances with virtually no signal loss.
     
  4. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    I understand the context of the thread I linked was video delivery. But I would call your attention to this post of yours in that thread:
    http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?p=10099770#post10099770
    In that post, if I understand it correctly, in response to Diana Collins pointing out some examples of impressive advances in wireless technology, you started your reply with "That's for wireless internet, not TV". That implies the context of her examples, by your own admission, included internet delivery.

    Your arguments are valid points for the near future, i.e., the next five years, but just look at what has happened in the last twenty years in both TV and internet technology. I think you're being too pessimistic about wireless internet, including in dense urban areas. The current cable operators are providing a huge economic incentive driving us toward alternate technologies with their high prices and poor product.
     
  5. trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    Look at cellular data and the speeds that being achieved already.

    Small towns can be served with a cell tower.
     
  6. jakep_82

    jakep_82 Member

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    If he wants to invite the other tenants to his apartment to watch TV that's perfectly legal. He's taking a giant step further by decrypting the cable and sending it via ethernet into other residences. This would be the same as the landlord subscribing to cable and using a splitter to run coax into each unit. Nowadays that won't work because everything is encrypted, but in the past it worked and it was very much illegal. Look up case history if you're not convinced. It doesn't matter how he's doing it, he's effectively splitting the cable and sending it into residences that aren't paying for it and aren't authorized by the cable company.
     
  7. trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    HE's basically becoming a cable company. He's the StraightTalk or PagePlus of the cable world.
     
  8. jakep_82

    jakep_82 Member

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    Yes, just without the authorization from the cableco to distribute it's product.
     
  9. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    From that post:

    Basically, it might be useful for rural users, since a heavily shared 10mbps uncapped or capped with a high data limit and reasonable overages is going to be a lot more attractive than LTE or satellite, and it might compete for current light suburban users, but there's no way that they are going directly up against an HFC plant or BPON, much less GPON.

    If AT&T or Verizon wanted to make a serious offering in the home LTE market (something like 150GB+ for under $70/mo with additonal GB for <$.50/GB), they have the resources to do so today, by using their cellular LTE networks, rolling out more channels of LTE in those rural markets, and pushing more backhaul to those towers, but they don't have an interest in it when some users are buying their mobile LTE service and paying the mobile rates for fixed service, which ends up being insanely expensive and profitable for AT&T or Verizon. However, if they did that it would either have to be permanently installed like the Verizon cantenna, or it would have to be limited to a couple of nearby towers so that someone couldn't take it into the city and use it with the high cap.

    Correct. This has been going on for a long time, and continues to go on in some areas. I know around here it's prevalent, especially with multifamily homes. The encryption doesn't really stop anyone, they can just have a couple of boxes in their name and go from there... I'm not saying it's right, it just happens.
     
  10. Random User 7

    Random User 7 Incognito

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    I was planning on cutting the cord tonight but now we are going out for some good beer. Guess it will have to wait until tomorrow.
     
  11. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    That wasn't really my point. My query concerned the actual behavior of consumers, not what the CATV companies perception of that behavior might be. Just because the companies think they will make more money, on the whole, one way versus the other doesn't make it true. I wasn't arguing that case one way or the other.

    No, they do it because it is their belief higher profits are to be had by bundling. Again, just because they fear ala carte access doesn't necessarily mean it will in fact be bad for them. Frankly, I am skeptical they have enough information at their disposal to know for sure. It may or may not be true, but I submit they are trading more on their paranoia than on reliable empirical data.
     
  12. zalusky

    zalusky Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    They do most of it because the content providers negotiate for it. They want you to buy all of their channels in a package. CBS owns many different channels just like ABC does...
     
  13. flashedbios

    flashedbios Member

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    i really don't need to justify it. Short of shoplifting, i steal all the time. I take out credit cards with no intent of paying, and payday loans too. I find all sorts of ways to cheat companies. And i dont feel bad about it. its about as easy to me as first grade math. I care about One person. me.
     
  14. zalusky

    zalusky Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    Can I get your name and address again?
     
  15. lessd

    lessd Well-Known Member

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    A world of you would be a great place to live in, if you don't pay somebody that you don't know does pay a higher price for whatever.
     
  16. Dec 1, 2014 #337 of 364
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    But this is the very nature of out of home streaming. The cable subscriber is decrypting the cable signal and can send it out to other residences. The other residences can not decrypt the signal unless the subscriber gives authorization. It's my understanding that there is no legal requirement for the physical presence of the subscriber at every location where they authorized decryption.

    The whole concept of out of home streaming never existed in the analog days. It seems to me that the cable subscriber now has the privilege to authorize decryption at other residences and there doesn't seem to be any requirement to notify the cable company when the subscriber authorizes decryption.
     
  17. Dec 1, 2014 #338 of 364
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    So, being a deadbeat and a criminal is just a career choice? :rolleyes:

    Guess what? I won't feel bad when they come and drag your sorry ass away and prosecute you for being the loser you so clearly profess to be. I hope you like prison food and the guy in the cell with you that wants you to be his ***** because that is clearly where you're headed, dumbass.
     
  18. Dec 1, 2014 #339 of 364
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Just forward mail to: Joliet State Prison, Joliet IL. :D

    Seriously, what is the point of responding to this person? He may or may not be for real. Either way he's clearly enjoying the responses he gets here (i.e., he's trolling). And if he's serious this forum isn't the place where he will get "help".
     
  19. Dec 2, 2014 #340 of 364
    jakep_82

    jakep_82 Member

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    I disagree. The law is pretty clear on this point in my opinion.

    "No person shall intercept or receive or assist in intercepting or receiving any communications service offered over a cable system, unless specifically authorized to do so by a cable operator or as may otherwise be specifically authorized by law."
     

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