Convert season passes to title wishlists

Discussion in 'TiVo Series 1 - UK' started by mikerr, May 21, 2011.

  1. mikerr

    mikerr TiVoCentral.co.uk

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    Jun 2, 2005
    Lancashire, UK

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    New one has a version number, old one doesn't ;)

    The install script can only add new files, not delete old ones
    so delete the old module and re-run install script

    rm tivoweb-tcl/modules/vseasonpass.itcl
    install vseasonpass-module
     
  2. PhilG

    PhilG New Member

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    Jan 15, 2002
    Deleted the old vseasonpass.itcl and repeated the install followed by a full reload of Tivoweb

    Still seems the same as before - no sign of a version number on the screen or in the script

    Has the target of the install command been updated??
     
  3. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I suggest you simply upload it the old way with Filezilla or Cute FTP etc instead.

    Fancy and impressive though Mike's new web install method is the old tried and trusted methods for the time being still seem to be more reliable.
     
  4. PhilG

    PhilG New Member

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    Jan 15, 2002
    Well, that DID work (of course)

    The other way is so much cooler though :)
     
  5. mikerr

    mikerr TiVoCentral.co.uk

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    The web install script keeps .tar archives in /tmp
    and won't download a new one unless that's deleted.

    Other linux'es clear /tmp every day - not sure if tivo only does it every reboot ?
     
  6. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    So the case for rebooting your Tivo daily on a timer by turning it off for 2 minutes at say 5am once again presents itself.

    I have been doing that for the last six years with my two Samsung HA250JCs and despite all the claims of the doom sayers about the extra hard drive wear that they alleged is involved the two hard drives have already exceeded most reasonable expectations of their maximum likely lifetime in constant 24/7 Tivo use.
     
  7. asfafa

    asfafa Member

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    Jan 14, 2004
    Bridgwater, UK
    Thanks Mike for the update!
     
  8. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    Dec 25, 2006
    So you'd say six years is more than the lifetime you'd expect for a TiVo? Interesting.
     
  9. mutant_matt2

    mutant_matt2 New Member

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    Dec 16, 2008
    LOL! :D Stop it now... ;) :p :D
     
  10. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I would say the hard drive is a consumable that the Tivo user is entitled to replace. The fact that many Tivo hard drives have failed in only two or three years whilst the machine continue to run on for many years with a new drive is proof of that. Any Tivo Lifetime Service contractual condition to the contrary is an Unfair Contract Term in my opinion.

    If a hard drive is not a consumable that the end user can replace then why do so many notebook computers have a convenient flap on the bottom that you can replace the hard drive through by unscrewing only two screws without disassembling the entire machine. That is not true of say a notebook computer's TFT screen or any of is internal fans.

    Also why does Sky make replacement of a hard drive on its Sky+ and Sky HD boxes so easy if they are not consumables that the end user is intended to be able to replace?
     
  11. AMc

    AMc Active Member

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    Mar 22, 2002
    East of England
    Tivo had a sticker on the case preventing access to the hard drives without invalidating the warranty. It was possible at one point to send your Tivo away for a replacement disk but that clearly wasn't something Tivo wanted you to do yourself.

    A case has screws that doesn't mean the manufacturer is happy for the user to muck around inside. Once you've opened the box everything after that was goodwill.
     
  12. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    Er, your TiVo not only has no flap, it has a sticker saying "don't open me" that you have to break, requires specialist tools to open the box and when inside has a power supply that will give you a shock if you touch it. It's very clearly not designed as a "consumable", quite aside from any common sense definition of the term (a hard disk is not "consumed" like ink in a printer of oil in a car.)
     
  13. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    That sticker was about invalidating the warranty not electrical safety. There is nothing about the inside of a Tivo which is significantly different from the inside of a desktop PC with a tv tuner card. Owners regularly upgrade hard drives and other components in desktop computers them themselves. The basic rule of electrical safety is to disconnect the unit from the mains before you open it. Also as I know you have opened and worked on your own Tivo internally it would appear that you are being something of a hypocrit just because it suits your argument.

    At this point it also almost begins to appear as though Tivo must be paying you to appear on these forums as their representative. Although the actual reality is that having worked on the AltEPG you are just annoyed to see any posts by other Tivo owners that might potentially render its creation unnecessary. I think you should come clean and admit that this is why you are giving me such a hard time.
     
  14. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    North West
    When replacing a hard drive you have to reinstall the operating system, which is proprietory, copyrighted software. On a 'regular' computer or notebook you are often given an installation disk to do this reinstallation. TiVo have never done this. It is perfectly within their rights to protect their intellectual property by insisting that unauthorised copying of their software will invalidate the warranty and consitute a breach of their service agreement.

    That they have had the goodwill to allow users to hack the software says a lot for the company. They could easily have 'done an Apple' and bricked the customised machines with updates from time to time.
     
  15. Trinitron

    Trinitron New Member

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    North West
    Sigh. We know you are losing the argument. That confirms it. :)
     
  16. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    That is categorically untrue. The insides of a TiVo have an unprotected power supply in which elements which can retain a charge long after device is disconnected are exposed. It would instantly fail any safety regulation for a user serviceable device.

    PC power supplies are sealed, safe units for this reason.

    I'm giving you a hard time because you are talking nonsense; the rest of that paragraph is a pretty good example of such nonsense. I've asked you before to stop attributing false motives to my actions; please do me the courtesy of doing so.
     
  17. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I'm obviously wasting my time arguing with people determined to make up arguments to defend Tivo's position. Spending time providing information to journalists is obviously a more worthwhile course of action.

    So far as I am aware no Tivo owner has been electrocuted while upgrading their Tivo power supply. If we were talking CRT televisions now that really is a device it would be dangerous to disassemble yourself.

    Oh yes and many congratulations TCM2007 on dragging this tread completely and utterly off topic. My comments about rebooting the Tivo once a day to avoid the issues with installing the Wishlist conversion utility were perfectly valid in relation to the thread but provided you with the bridge head you needed to start claiming I was in violation of Tivo's service conditions or electrical safety rules and so forth.
     
  18. Pete77

    Pete77 New Member

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    I made it perfectly clear in the next sentence that TCM's motivation for always taking Tivo's side on their withdrawal of Lifetime Service was in fact a different one relating to his involvement in the AltEPG project.

    Still there is nothing like taking one sentence of what someone said deliberately out of context in order to try to score a point I suppose.
     
  19. TCM2007

    TCM2007 New Member

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    Pete, I've asked you nicely several times (over many years now) to stop attributing false motives to my actions. I don't understand why you continue to do so. Especially libellous ones like suggesting I want the TiVo service to end for some self interested reasons. As you come from a monied family you could probably afford to defend a libel action better than I could afford to bring one unfortunately.

    I can only think it's linked to the psychological problems you've exhibited in other threads, where you can't bring yourself not to constantly criticise and niggle at people who are trying to help you. Some kind of OCD-related issues I guess.
     
  20. Benedict

    Benedict Always Thinking!

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    So that makes it safe does it??? What a load of b******s you talk Pete! TCM2007 is 100% correct (I used to be a test engineer at a test house in a previous life, testing IT, telecom and consumer electronics equipment for electrical safety compliance).

    A PC has no user accessible parts at hazardous voltages (user accessible generally means that access can be gained by the user either without the use of a tool, or using a tool as instructed by the manufacturer). As TCM2007 states the PSU in a PC is sealed, and in most cases double insulated. Open up a TiVo and you have access to hazardous parts in the PSU, therefore the whole of the inside of a TiVo would be classed as non-user accessible (I don't recall any instructions in the TiVo manual regarding taking off the lid). If it's not user accessible then the HD can't be classified as a user-replacable part. This is also the reason why dial-up modem PC cards all had a nice plastic cover over part of the circuit board. The parts under this cover were deemed non-user accessible, since they were hazardous - you can get a nasty belt from the ringing signal sent down your phone line!

    No - the basic rule of electrical safety is to follow the manufacturer's instructions (which also have to comply with the same requirements as the kit itself). I'm 100% certain that the instructions will not include details of how to open up the case and just as certain that they'll contain a statement warning you NOT to do the same (no user serviceable parts, etc.) Unplugging the unit from the mains will not protect you from getting a nasty belt from one of the large electrolytic capacitors used in PSUs!
     

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