Can they disable all TiVos one day?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by dougtv, Oct 14, 2020.

  1. Oct 18, 2020 #21 of 100
    PSU_Sudzi

    PSU_Sudzi Well-Known Member

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    The number of retail TiVo customers continues to dwindle and most likely will follow that path. Seems unlikely they would resort to bricking boxes or cutting off guide data but not impossible.
     
  2. Dec 1, 2020 #22 of 100
    Darrell Patton

    Darrell Patton Active Member

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    I think a real possibility would be for a competitor to buy the consumer part of the TIVO company, offer a deal to switch to their main product, and shutdown all support, to include the guide service.

    Before you dismiss that idea as wasteful, consider a true life example:
    Back in the 1980's there were two large water parks in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, competing directly with each other. One bought the other and shut it down. They poured concrete in all the water collection lines, thus preventing anyone from ever reopening the park.
     
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  3. Dec 3, 2020 #23 of 100
    slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    They will get sued by All-In Edge owners (at the minimum) if that were the case, which it won't be.
     
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  4. Dec 3, 2020 #24 of 100
    hapster85

    hapster85 Well-Known Member

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    Anxiety, no. But I'm disinclined to buy another TiVo product should my Roamio OTA die. While I have been, and continue to be, happy with its performance, the future seems limited at best for their consumer products.
     
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  5. Dec 3, 2020 #25 of 100
    trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    Not going to happen. Who would benefit from Tivo being gone? I don't see it. I don't see the equivalent competing water park in the dvr space whose business would go gangbusters if Tivo was vaporized overnight.
     
  6. Dec 4, 2020 #26 of 100
    Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    And the Sezmi DVR's were bricked, as well. It seems they all prefer bricking to at least allowing us to view what was recorded on the HDD. In the case of Sony, it was the lack of Rovi (they actually came into the TV stations--with permission--and just, unceremoniously, yanked out the equipment) TV Guide data that greatly limited their DVR's to being useless to the common man (but techies were still able to get some use out of them), but in the case of Sony's DVR, at least, did not brick them.
     
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  7. Dec 4, 2020 #27 of 100
    CommunityMember

    CommunityMember Active Member

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    The only value to another company would be the IP, and Xperi is not going to sell that part. The consumer DVR is a product space that is slowly dying, as the majority of people move to on-demand content.

    People have never wanted a DVR, per say, what they have wanted is to consume the content they want to see, when they want to see it, where they want to see it, and on the device they want to see it on. A DVR was just the way to accomplish that. And TiVo was arguably the leader in the DVR space ("To TiVo" something was part of the vernacular, just like "To Xerox" something became synonymous with making a paper copy). But DVRs will eventually be sitting in museums next to their predecessor technologies of VCRs (and for those with a long memory, the Sony U-matic)
     
  8. Dec 4, 2020 #28 of 100
    ufo4sale

    ufo4sale Well-Known Member

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    I'm the poster child of TiVo. I grew up with one since the first day I was born. As long as i'm alive TiVo will be too. I'm not planning on going any where any time soon.:):cool:
     
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  9. Dec 4, 2020 #29 of 100
    CodeButcher

    CodeButcher Member

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    I had ReplayTV, which was far superior to Tivo in it's heyday. After being bought out by Marantz/Denon they just abandoned the whole company and used the software license for other platforms like DirecTV Genie.
     
  10. Dec 5, 2020 #30 of 100
    Series3Sub

    Series3Sub Well-Known Member

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    Keep in mind that MSO's and satellite still depend upon DVR's to those who still subscribe to Cable and satellite becaue while it is easier to just set a recording and forget it and not have to browse through a never ending amount of content on a service like Netflix, the trick-play on DVR's is a far better experience witn Live TV, and the VOD experiece of watching the latest, just aired shows can be more frustrating to deal with than just playing back a locally recorded episode on the DVR that will NEVER be "taken down" from the streaming VOD library, and NOT have to deal with COMMERCIALS that can NOT be skipped inserted into the just aired episode using the VOD on cable or satellite.

    For cable or sat, the DVR is still the EASIER to use (more intuituve), and allows the skipping of commericals, and no internet data connection needed, as I had just had to endure a 20 hour outage of my internet service about a week ago. Thankfully I have satellite and OTA and none of my TV options were impacted by the ISP outage, although several people in other parts of the country related being 3 or more DAYS (some even endured a WEEK) without ISP service. No OTT TV for them. OUCH!
     
  11. Dec 5, 2020 #31 of 100
    wizwor

    wizwor Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and people who suffer DVRs miss out on buffering, service interruptions, and programs being removed unexpectedly. A DVR is still the best way to time shift programming.
     
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  12. Dec 5, 2020 #32 of 100
    RMSko

    RMSko Active Member

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    Agreed. A DVR allows for one click viewing vs on demand where you first have to find the app and then find the program
     
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  13. Dec 5, 2020 #33 of 100
    trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    a dvr makes you record the show first. and makes you manage your storage space. And makes you prioritize shows. And manage tuners and pad recordings. and delete stuff. and decide who many episodes to keep at a time. etc.

    That doesn't strike me as simpler than just going to your show and hitting play without having to do anything else.
     
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  14. Dec 5, 2020 #34 of 100
    wizwor

    wizwor Well-Known Member

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    Oh the HORRORS!
     
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  15. Dec 5, 2020 #35 of 100
    ej42137

    ej42137 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what your point is here. Should we put up with those inconveniences as a character building exercise?

    I've been a TiVo fanboi for a very long time, but even I can see that their days are numbered. Streaming simply provides a better experience. There is no crap on the lower thirds, the cable company doesn't get the opportunity to derez the picture, the narrative is not interrupted a regular intervals by a requirement to fast-forward over commercials, and (most important to me) we get a real 1080p or better signal. And we don't have to manage our recordings any more.

    There are downsides, of course. Trick play isn't as good, although it is needed much less when the commercials are gone. One is at the mercy of one's Internet connection and the whims of Netflix's programming manager for content.

    But when TiVo started with pre-roll ads I knew the romance was over.
     
  16. Dec 5, 2020 #36 of 100
    hapster85

    hapster85 Well-Known Member

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    I spend very little time doing any of that. I keep very few things once I watch them. I think my drive is currently at 60% free space, but not sure. It's never been close to full, so I've never had to spend time clearing out the old to make room for the new. All one passes are set to keep recordings until I delete them. Easy peasy.
     
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  17. Dec 5, 2020 #37 of 100
    trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    YOu know what's even easier? Not doing any of that.
     
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  18. Dec 5, 2020 #38 of 100
    wizwor

    wizwor Well-Known Member

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    If you do not like DVRs, move on. This is the wrong forum. You will not find support among those of us who like TiVos.

    Fanboi
    Deliberate mispelling of the word 'fanboy' typically referring to an annoying, immature fan of a specific video game console.

    Got it!

    Your view of the entertainment universe is very limited.

    Again, you are in the wrong forum.
     
  19. Dec 6, 2020 #39 of 100
    shwru980r

    shwru980r Well-Known Member

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    You can save alot of money with a DVR because you can get rid of broadband internet and use a cheap hot spot with a few hundred MB of data per month for the guide data.
     
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  20. Dec 6, 2020 #40 of 100
    slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    None of which concern me in the least, because all of it is overblown. For me.
     
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