Can I connect my Tivo S3 directly to my mac mini?

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by zgeist, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. Aug 2, 2011 #1 of 28
    zgeist

    zgeist New Member

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    I want to transfer some shows to my mac mini (using iTivo) but it's really slow over my wireless network. And it frequently just drops the transfer altogether.

    My router is at the opposite end of the house, so hardwiring everything is not really possible.

    I had the brilliant idea of just connecting my mac mini directly to the tivo using a crossover cable since the two devices sit near each other in my tv console. ... But it doesn't seem to work. No new devices show up in finder anyway.

    I did find this other thread that said it was possible: http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?t=448707

    Is there something else I still need to do?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Aug 2, 2011 #2 of 28
    lpwcomp

    lpwcomp Well-Known Member

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    You might try changing the TiVo network settings to "Let the DVR assign itself an IP address"
     
  3. Aug 3, 2011 #3 of 28
    ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay TCF Club

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    You might try another channel on your wireless as interference can slow down wireless networks, try 1, 6, or 11.
     
  4. Aug 3, 2011 #4 of 28
    robomeister

    robomeister DVD TiVo Expert

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    To answer your original question, yes, you can. But you'll need a cross-over ethernet cable. A regular cable probably won't work. Then you'll need to create an ad hoc network. Basically, you need to set an ethernet address on your TiVo and one on your computer, i.e. 192.168.1.2 on the tivo and 192.168.1.5 on your computer.

    Good luck
    robomeister
     
  5. Aug 3, 2011 #5 of 28
    wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    The Tivo still requires it's own internet connection (for the guide, updates, etc). So, what, you're going to try connecting both wifi and a wired connection? And I'm guessing you're also using the Mac via wifi as well?

    I don't know if the Tivo will allow using two network connections.

    What you might then be able to do is set both the Tivo and the Mac to use static addresses on the wired ports and connect between them with a cross-over ethernet cable (although you could try using a plain one, don't know if either port is smart enough to configure itself properly). Be sure to use an IP network that's not the same as your existing one.

    Alternatively you could wire a connection from the Tivo to the Mac and use the Mac's wifi connection to the internet. In essence using the mini as a router for the Tivo. This would mean the Mac would have to be on all the time.

    A third option would be to set up a wifi bridge and use both the Tivo and the Mac wired to it. This would put the Tivo and Mac on the same network and then have their traffic bridged over to the rest of your wifi network.

    I'd use the third option. This way both the Mac and the Tivo think they're still on a regular network connection and won't have any other troubles.
     
  6. Aug 3, 2011 #6 of 28
    Fofer

    Fofer Bo55man69

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    This is incorrect.

    All recent Macintosh computers are able to use either a straight-through Ethernet cable or a crossover Ethernet cable automatically through the use of Auto-Medium Dependent Interface Crossover (Auto-MDIX). (Earlier Macintosh computers require the use of an Ethernet crossover cable because they only work with the Medium Dependent Interface (MDI) .)

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2274
     
  7. Aug 4, 2011 #7 of 28
    zgeist

    zgeist New Member

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    Yes, exactly. But it didn't seem to work. I connected the Tivo and the Mac to each other using a cross-over cable (which apparently I didn't need to use, regular ethernet would have been fine.) But no extra devices showed up on the mac. But, I'm not really up on the details of how networking works - esp. on the mac.

    This sounds interesting, but I don't know how to set these devices to use static ips on just their ports. It would involve some deep research on my part.

    My Tivo seems to be more reliable than my mac - so I'm not sure I want to rely on the mac's internet connection. :)

    Hmm, I'm not sure I know how to do this but it sounds easier (and more likely to work) than configuring the ip addresses of the ethernet ports. It would require me to buy some more hardware though.

    Of course, would an Apple Express serve this purpose? I've thought about getting one of those so I could stream music to my stereo.



    BTW, do you think if I disabled the wireless on both tivo and mac that the ethernet connection would just magically happen. After all - the reason I want to get stuff off the tivo is to archive a whole bunch of kid shows that I don't want to delete, but there are so many of them we can't record any adult shows!!! 39 episodes of Dinosaur Train anyone? 29 episodes of Sid the Science kid? So, I wouldn't need to keep the Tivo offline for very long ... of course, transferring 39 shows could take a while, couldn't it?


    Thank you for all the great ideas!!!
     
  8. Aug 5, 2011 #8 of 28
    wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    You miss my point, I don't think the Tivo will allow using two different connection. No wifi and wired at the same time.

    Using a bridge is relatively simple. Just setup the bridge router and connect the Tivo and Mac to it. The bridge then routes their traffic via Wifi to the rest of your network.

    I don't think an Express will do this. Apple is notorious for not allowing their devices to do anything complicated.
     
  9. Aug 5, 2011 #9 of 28
    scandia101

    scandia101 Just the facts ma'am

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    and so can all stand alone Tivo's with a built in ethernet port. ;)
     
  10. ThAbtO

    ThAbtO TiVoholic by the bay TCF Club

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    Yes, you can have both wired and wireless as long as its the same router.
     
  11. rmcurtis

    rmcurtis Member

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    I wouldn't think that the TiVo would just show up in the Finder even if you get the networking all set up correctly. Your access to the TiVo shows would be through the web page on the TiVo. You would have to point your browser on the Mac at "https://<TiVo IP address here>/". It should prompt for username and password. The username is "tivo" and the password is your MAK (Media Access Key) found in the System Information menu on the TiVo.
     
  12. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    Which you couldn't have in the scenario he's got. It would require creating a 2nd subnet just for the connection between the Tivo and the Mac. That's not the same network and there's no same connection to the router.

    Also consider that Tivo uses multicast for the Desktop functions. It may be that your wifi router isn't configured to pass multicast between wifi clients. As a pseudo-security technique some routers limit communication between wifi client devices.
     
  13. zgeist

    zgeist New Member

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    Ok, so here is what I did:

    At first I tried to find my Tivo's ip address by looking it up on my router - I got the number and tried to get to the website and to my surprise I got my print server's website! :p So, obviously that ip number was not correct.

    Then I looked on the Tivo itself and sure enough the ip it had was completely different. In fact it was in a different number range altogether, ie, it did not get it's ip assigned from the router. So, I guess that means that if the ethernet port of the Tivo is plugged into a network then it overrides the wireless. I don't have a bridge, so I haven't tried using both the ethernet and wireless simultaneously on the same network, but I suspect Tivo would pick one or the other. And I can't think of a use for such an arrangement anyway.

    Using the ip address that Tivo had and the mak number I was able to log into the Tivo website and see a listing of all my recorded shows. (Thanks for that info - I didn't know you could do that!)

    Using the proper ip address, I was able to connect to my Tivo using iTivo and try my downloads again. iTivo is very slow in retrieving info from the tivo. And it is *still* very slow in downloading shows - even though it was now hardwired. It said an almost 3 Gb show would take almost 3 hrs. Is this still that software limitation that I've read about in other forums? I thought I'd read that Tivo fixed that in an update???

    As it was though, the download hung with only 24 mins to go. And that was the main problem I was trying to solve. I had thought that perhaps the wireless signal was getting interrupted and that is why it was hanging. But even wired it still hangs! Bummer.

    So now, I'm going to either try:

    1) putting parallels on my mac mini so I can use the windows version of Tivo to Go.

    or 2) putting Roxio Toast on my mac mini so I can use it's Tivo download feature.

    Does anyone have any experience comparing those two? Which is faster? I figure, once I get the files off of the Tivo I should be able to convert them into whatever format I want, right? In the end, I just want to archive some shows for the kids.

    Thank you for all your helpful suggestions and comments!
     
  14. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    Different IP ranges between wired and wireless? What make/model router do you have? It would be strange for most consumer wifi routers to use different ranges for wired/wifi.

    And you're sure you're calling it 'range' properly? It's usually the first 3 sets of numbers that determine range. The last set are the addresses within the range. So 192.168.1.253 and 192.168.1.2 are both in the same range (if it's a typical Class C subnet).

    I don't know that Parallels will properly pass multicast traffic. Few products handle this properly and Tivo Desktop depends upon it.
     
  15. zgeist

    zgeist New Member

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    It's not between wired and wireless really - let me explain. At the moment, my Tivo is connected - hardwired - to my mac mini, not my router. So, it's not getting the ip from the router at all. It WAS getting it's ip from the router when it was wireless and the address was something like: 192.168.0.100 but now, when hardwired to the mini, it is: 169:254:174:100


    I don't know anything about multicast or even what that means. I guess I will have to do some research.

    Thank you everyone for all your help on this thread.
     
  16. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    And you didn't configure your Mac to act as a router, like I mentioned above. So the Tivo made up it's own address in the 169 subnet.

    Once you're done screwing around, look into what I suggested as option 3. It'll be the most reliable long-term and have the least headaches.
     
  17. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    I'm afraid there is a lot of bad advice, here. To cut through all of it, let's start over:

    First of all, set both your Tivo and your Mac to static IP addresses. That means disable anything on either device that says anything to the effect, "Obtain IP address automatically". After having disabled DHCP (automatic IP address resolution), you will have to supply an IP address for both devices. Now, if these two devices are the only ones talking to each other, and this is essentially a temporary solution, then the addrresses really don't matter, much, except that they be different from each other but on the same subnet.

    A good choice might be 192.168.0.2 for the Mac and 192.168.0.3 for the TiVo, both with a netmask of 255.255.255.0 ( FF.FF.FF.0 ). It is not necessary to assign a default gateway on either machine.

    Now, if you are going to try to set up this arrangement more or less permanently, then you are going to want to be able to get to the outside world. The only difference this makes is that the two devices will have to be on the same subnet as your internet router, and must not conflict with any other device on the subnet. This means you will have to discover all the IP addreses of all the devices on the LAN, and choose one not in use by other devices. If, for example, your router has an IP of 192.168.0.1 with a netmask of 255.255.255.0, and its DHCP server range is .2 - .50, then you would want to set your Mac to 192.168.0.51 and the TiVo to 192.168.0.52, provided no other device on the network has those addresses. Set the default gateway on both devices to be the address of the LAN port of your router.

    Note some routers require that the IP address of each device - static IP or not - needs to be registered on the router. This is not common, but some routers have more stringent security methods in place.
     
  18. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    I wouldn't call it stange. Some do. Others allow it as an option. Admittedly most consumer routers have bridging of the wireless network as the only option, but I've run across a number that do not.

    "Range" is not a well defined term in this context, and "Class C" is not strictly speaking a proper term to use when speaking of a non-routable subnet. The documentation of many devices uses the term "range" to mean the DHCP pool size, typically about 50 - 128 devices by default. A /24 subnet has a netmask of 255.255.255.0, and indeed the last quad is the host address, whille the first three quads constitute the network address.

    I don't recommend TiVo Desktop, in any case.
     
  19. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    I suspect for a different reason.

    For uploading from the Tivo to your external device, I recommend either Galleon or kmttg. For downloading from the external device to the TiVo, I recommend either Galleon or pyTivo.

    Galleon is pretty easy to set up and has some unique features found nowhere else. Kmttg is a bit involved to set up, although not really difficult, but for uploading using the PC interface, it offers more features than any other software. Galleon, OTOH, has lots of plug-ins and offers more flexibility in control form the TiVo and from an external device other than the Galleon server.

    The uplpoad interface is plain vanilla Secure HTTP. Unless something is wrong somwhere, the upload speed is going to be determined by the capabilities of the TiVo.

    Well, more or less. Kmttg offers the best flexibility for this purpose.
     
  20. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

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    Range is a perfectly acceptable term to use. As is assuming a 192.168.x.x address is going to be in a Class C block. As that's how the RFCs suggest it's use and how most consumer routers set it up. You use the term /24 and then mention netmask as if they were something different, they're not, they mean exactly the same thing, in this and most other contexts.
     

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