Breaking Bad - S05E16 - "Felina" (series finale!)

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by jkeegan, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. Jan 4, 2021 #801 of 813
    Worf

    Worf Well-Known Member

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    It's not hard. A business that size might easily take out petty cash in the form of hundreds. For a reasonable sized business, having a petty cash of $1000 or more isn't unusual.

    Also, fast food joints dealing with hundreds isn't unusual - a meal for 4 can easily be $30-40 and you can expect to see $100 bills. Granted you probably will see twenties, but having several hundred dollar bills at the end of the day wouldn't be too unusual.

    Maybe a convenience store that mostly deals with $1 items might not get many hundreds, but they certainly would if they sold gas.

    Heck, even a retail store dealing with payroll often involves paying hundreds of dollars to employees (and yes, a lot of smaller mom and pop businesses will pay you in cash rather than to continually cut cheques). A couple of weeks of full shifts can easily be a few hundred dollars.
     
  2. Jan 4, 2021 #802 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    As I asserted, we didn't know for sure the barrels of money were all 100s.. so here's a little evidence.

    You can definitely see 10s, 50s, and 100s. I think there are 20s in there as well.
    The strap colors generally denote different denominations.
    But also remember this isn't real currency, it's fake hollywood currency, so it won't match exactly under scrutiny.
    It just shows that the money pile which ended up in the black barrels wasn't all 100s.

    (Side note: The actor on the left is Bill Barr who played Mayfeld in The Mandelorian.)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Jan 4, 2021 #803 of 813
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    C'mon, man! This is BB! :D

    The show has a history of avoiding shortcuts on seemingly minor details that could possibly be picked up in an HD freeze frame. I wouldn't put it past them to put a single authentic bill on the top of each bundle...
     
  4. Jan 4, 2021 #804 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    The other thing that occured to me is that (in BCS mostly) when Tuco and Nacho would collect cash from the street dealers/collectors, they looked like rolls of 100s. So if they distributed the conversion of the lower denominations to higher denominations down to the lowest level (dealers could only submit 100s to the bosses), each street dealer could deposit their cash into a bank ATM or teller, and then withdraw a dozen or more 100s from another ATM or teller the next day. Going into a bank and taking out say $2000 to $5000 (that's only 20 to 50 bills in $100 denomination) isn't a big deal on the individual level (I've done that several times when buying/selling cars in cash). Banks are only really concerned of cash transactions over $10k. A drug dealer could spread that over three or four banks and not really raise any flags. This way, only 100s get sent up the chain and the conversion is widely distributed.
     
  5. Jan 4, 2021 #805 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    There are actually laws in place that dictate what fake U.S. currency can be used on screen. V.G. et al wouldn't be able to circumvent that and I doubt the studio would let them.

    Just look at the portraits -- they are not the real portraits.

    Blank Filler Prop Money

    edit: From: The Business of Fake Hollywood Money

    ISS: Props - ISS Props
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2021
  6. Jan 4, 2021 #806 of 813
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    From your link:

    .
     
  7. Jan 4, 2021 #807 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Yes, they can do that.. but in the BB scene, they didn't.
     
  8. Jan 4, 2021 #808 of 813
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    You just said they couldn't, though.
     
  9. Jan 4, 2021 #809 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    That’s not what I said. I didn’t say they couldn’t do that, only that there are specific rules about FAKE CURRENCY that can be used on screen.
     
  10. Jan 4, 2021 #810 of 813
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    Apologies.
     
  11. Jan 4, 2021 #811 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Thanks.

    All I was trying to say was that the money pile wasn't all 100s as originally presented in the money laundering question.
     
  12. Jan 5, 2021 #812 of 813
    Worf

    Worf Well-Known Member

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    Actually, there aren't rules on fake currency. The only rule is that you cannot show real currency in a way that it can be counterfeited. (From the department of treasury)

    Now, Hollywood use money props to simulate the money because with all the angles and all that, there may be an angle you accidentally film that would make the currency counterfeit-able and thus against the law. But I'm sure that's not the real reason.

    Though, the more practical reason is - fake money is cheap. If you want to show a million dollars on screen, if you use real money (and you can), it would cost you a million dollars. But if you use prop money, it will cost you probably a couple hundred bucks. Of course, the movie audience worldwide is generally familiar with the look of US currency, so your fake cash needs to look like that on screen. You cannot reproduce real currency for obvious reasons, but you can alter it so it's fake - changing the President photo is a common way, as is changing the "United States of America" text. It looks real, but fails even the most cursory inspection so it cannot be used in place of real money.

    Fake money is also used because you can leave it on set without guarding it, very important for set dressing and set continuity. Real money you don't want to leave around for obvious reasons, and that would mean you would spend an hour cleaning up after shooting and another hour putting the bills back prior to shooting. Plus, you won't have to worry about a briefcase full of money and security and all that. If you have stacks of fake cash laying around, you can leave them laying around. If you use real cash, you have to have security stand around guarding it. Plus, if you want to burn it or set it alight, that may or may not be illegal to do on real currency, but no such problems on fake currency, and you're also not burning up thousands of dollars at the same time.
     
  13. Jan 5, 2021 #813 of 813
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Yes, there are specific rules about creating/replicating U.S. currency from the Treasury Department (Secret Service).

    If the filmmakers can't follow these rules, they have to create prop currency that can be the same size and double-sided, etc. If they create prop currency that looks too much like real currency (as per the Secret Service) they will get cease-and-desist orders. So yes, there are rules about creating fake currency that are enforced by the SS.

    I maintain a database of thousands of instances of real currency being used in TV, films, ads, commercials, etc -- all clear images of real currency.
    Here's probably the most notable example from season 4 of The Sopranos.

    [​IMG]
     

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