Better Call Saul S02E02 "Cobbler" 2/22/16

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by thebigmo, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. Feb 24, 2016 #61 of 103
    mike_k

    mike_k Registered User

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    I do realize that, thanks.
     
  2. Feb 24, 2016 #62 of 103
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Well, assuming he had $60k* to buy the hummer in cash, he had to have had a way to launder that money so the feds don't pick up on the cash transaction. I don't think he's smart enough to successfully launder that much money without detection, but paying a $500 lease payment every month in cash most likely would not raise suspicion. I'm sure most of you know that any cash transaction over $10k has to be reported to the feds (it might be less now since 9/11).. So no way he can just walk into a hummer dealer, plop down $60k and walk out with the car. A lease actually makes much more sense for someone with that much cash to launder.

    It does not appear that he had any help laundering that kind of cash.


    *I'm guessing a hummer costs $60k.
    ** Or $12, same as downtown.
     
  3. Feb 24, 2016 #63 of 103
    mrdbdigital

    mrdbdigital The TBS Archives TCF Club

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    Mark Proksch was also in a season One episode - "Pimento".
     
  4. Feb 24, 2016 #64 of 103
    MikeAndrews

    MikeAndrews Registered abuser

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    How did Wormald hook up with Nacho in the first place?

    As I remember Wormald drives up to meet Mike the first time ever and heads to meet Nacho. Didn't the veterinarian hook up Mike with Wormald? The vet knew Wormald through his drug supplier.

    Was it Mike that knew of Nacho and Tuco?
     
  5. Feb 24, 2016 #65 of 103
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    Mike didn't know Nacho (or Tuco, AFAIK?) before being hired as Wormold(?)'s security in Pimento.
     
  6. Feb 24, 2016 #66 of 103
    Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

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    And she being a lawyer, I hope the care with which she worded her demand ("I don't want to hear about it") was her giving Jimmy a way out (do it if you must but don't tell me about it) rather than the writers giving him a way out. (And given the quality of this show, I suspect it was the former.)
     
  7. Feb 24, 2016 #67 of 103
    pdhenry

    pdhenry Ruthless

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    We know what eventually happens to the Jimmy & Kim relationship, though. In a big picture way, anyway.

    But what I heard her say was that for now, at least, she can't know about that kind of stuff.
     
  8. Feb 24, 2016 #68 of 103
    Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

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    Yes, and her being a lawyer that would have to be what she meant.

    A lesser show, however, could use that as a springboard for a misunderstanding between them. I.e., Jimmy keeps doing what he does and she gets upset because she (thought she) told him not to.
     
  9. Feb 25, 2016 #69 of 103
    JohnB1000

    JohnB1000 Well-Known Member

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    According to the podcast they did not know he was the Yo-Yo man when they hired him for this role.
     
  10. Feb 25, 2016 #70 of 103
    VegasVic

    VegasVic Craps Player

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    Cops can say whatever they want in an interview. They can tell the guy they have his DNA at the scene even it they don't. As said above if Jimmy had presented the video IN COURT AS EVIDENCE that would have been illegal. What he did was not.
     
  11. Feb 25, 2016 #71 of 103
    Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

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    You realize Jimmy's not a cop, right?
     
  12. Feb 25, 2016 #72 of 103
    DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give 'em Hell, Devils

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    Jimmy: Why are you here?

    Chuck: To bear witness.

    It was very cold. Intentionally so.

    I think you're still confused from the last thread. The scene where Jimmy turned down the job was not in S1. In the S1 finale, we saw him walking toward the court building, he fingers Marco's ring, and then we see him get back in his car and leave the parking lot. In the S2 premiere, they gave us more context for that scene, by showing us what happened between when Jimmy was walking toward the building and when he walked out a few minutes later.

    I suspect she phrased it that way on purpose, but his answer was also phrased carefully, not indicating that he'd stop that kind of behavior, but only that he wouldn't tell her about it anymore. I suspect the fact that he's keeping secrets from her will become a big issue between them.
     
  13. Feb 25, 2016 #73 of 103
    VegasVic

    VegasVic Craps Player

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    No I never realized that :rolleyes:

    Just as what cops say in an interview is not evidence what a lawyer says during an interview is also not evidence.
     
  14. Feb 25, 2016 #74 of 103
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Right, but if the cops can lie to extract evidence or a confession, why can't a perp or his lawyer lie also?
     
  15. Feb 25, 2016 #75 of 103
    SeanC

    SeanC ECT

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    True enough, and for the record that is what I took from your post. However, what people and lawyers can say while being interviewed is different from what the police can say.

    Certainly lying to the FBI is a felony. I don't think lying per se is a felony at the state level but obstruction of justice certainly is and my TV lawyering skills tells me that lying during an interview with the police can absolutely cause you a lot of grief later, for lawyers and civilians alike.
     
  16. Feb 25, 2016 #76 of 103
    DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give 'em Hell, Devils

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    Two more observations from watching the episode:

    When Chuck and Hamlin are talking in the cold open and Hamlin says that he told Clifford Main all the details about Jimmy and didn't pull any punches, "but I didn't stand in the way." and Chuck's response is classic: "Of course not. Nor should you." But the two of them clearly know that Chuck has very much stood in the way of Jimmy's career. I just loved the look on Chuck's face as he says that, as if he knows that's the correct thing to say and think, but knowing that he's done the exact opposite.

    The scene where Mike is sitting in the guard shack and the camera is looking straight down on his coffee and there's a small ripple and then suddenly a huge amount of ripples and I knew immediately that Price (Daniel Wormold) was pulling up. Those kind of artistic touches are what make me love this show so much.
     
  17. Feb 25, 2016 #77 of 103
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    Yeah, that was a great scene, and suddenly made Hamlin "not such a bad guy" afterall (not sure I want to say "good guy" just yet). And that it was Chuck all along that was holding Jimmy back and Hamlin was essentially just doing what he was told to do by Chuck.

    And I think Hamlin was totally open-minded about Jimmy's skills, and the work he did to create the Sandpiper case. But Chuck will never ever be able to get "Slippin' Jimmy" out of his mind.

    I have essentially the same problem with my brother, who is a compulsive "embellisher" -- he tells some tall tales from his youth... most of which I know are outright fiction, but some have a shred of truth. But the problem now is that no matter what he says, I can't believe any of it, since I never know what is truth and what is made up in his mind. And if something great happened to him (he likes meeting celebrities), I probably wouldn't believe him. But everyone else probably would.
     
  18. Feb 25, 2016 #78 of 103
    Rob Helmerichs

    Rob Helmerichs I am Groot! TCF Club

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    It's not evidence, but lying to the police is a crime (obstruction of justice). Making a video to cover up a crime is a crime.

    And I suspect it might be more of one for a lawyer.
    Or a T-Rex. It could have been a T-Rex.
     
  19. Feb 25, 2016 #79 of 103
    SeanC

    SeanC ECT

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    I still marvel at how my opinion of Hamlin changed from the start of the show, and I like it when a show can do that to me for a character, it means they aren't 1 dimensional.

    At the start I thought for sure that Hamlin was a classic narcissistic jerk and Chuck was a good brother, then when we finally know that it was Chuck all along that didn't want Jimmy in the firm, I gained a TON of respect for Hamlin. I think he genuinely likes both Chuck and Jimmy, I think he really does think Jimmy is a good lawyer. I'm just blown away by being Hamlin and being stuck in that position. Your partner in your lawfirm makes you the bad guy in keeping the partner's brother from working for the firm. The brother takes offence (naturally) and blames you (Hamlin), and you (Hamlin) just take it on the chin, for months (years?), but always keeping a smile, always being nice to both brothers.
     
  20. Feb 25, 2016 #80 of 103
    jsmeeker

    jsmeeker Notable Member TCF Club

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    That's what I mean. I didn't remember that scene at the end of season 1. That was him turning down the job. We just didn't see him actually do it

    Hank was right. I didn't make the connection between what we saw in Episode 1 of season 2 and the last scene of the last episode of season 1.


    Thought we got this cleared up in the last thread.
     

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