Best MoCa config

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by saunsaun, Nov 10, 2019.

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  1. fyodor

    fyodor Active Member

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    If you're having more general wifi network problems it's either unrelated to your change of the splitter, or the cable modem is getting too weak of a signal, which won't be fixed by a mesh network.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
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  2. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    Weak WiFi signals would be fixed with a mesh network. Getting the Cable Modem in a separate circuit from the MoCa network with only one splitter between it and the CableCo will improve the Cable Modem signal and decrease signal interference that could cause an unstable internet connection.
     
  3. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    The advantage of using mesh devices is that you can have a wireless backhaul. That's it.

    Mesh network is not defined by the backhaul it uses but by having multiple APs using the same SSID to provide seamless coverage throughout the covered area. This has been around for years but only in the end user consumer market more recently.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  4. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    The one that was referenced is a 802.11n device.

    Actiontec WCB6200Q is a 802.11ac device.

    It depends on your needs which one you should use. FWIW your Trendnet AC1750 TEW812DRU v2 is an AC router. In either case, get your cable modem connected directly to that outdoor splitter and then use a POE filter in front of that modem to decrease interference from your MoCa network.
     
  5. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    That's your outside box?

    What market are you in?

    Comcast currently is requiring all Techs to install a much larger outdoor box on the house. That's why I recommended moving the Unity Gain Amplified Splitter out there. The proper sized box would hold the amp.

    That way, you'll be preserving all your signal level at the initial split, block your MoCA from leaving the premise (that amp has a built in MoCA Filter) and provide MoCA pathways throughout the house.

    If you called Comcast and were careful enough in the framing of the request, you could get Comcast to swap that box and get it all rewired, too...

    -KP
     
  6. saunsaun

    saunsaun New Member

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    Nov 10, 2019
    I'm new to this and trying to figure out the direction based on your answers and advice.

    1. How can I figure out if the basement mini is working well? I haven't used it a lot yet. Is there something I can look at in the NW status? I have noticed Network slowness on my laptop since making the change outside.
    2. Do I need to get the AC device because my router is AC? The price went up significantly for that.
    3. The point seems to be a good one to have the modem more directly connected to the house connection than it is. Is there a way that I can put my modem in the basement now? I would still need wired connections in the office.

    The cable box is too small to close which is why it isn't locked and I can get into it. Comcast has been out here several times and they never replace it for me. I can't remember what they say about it. Maybe just because they don't have one with them? We just bought a larger box off of Amazon this past week but haven't installed it yet. KP, I'm trying to understand what your solution would look like. How many connections would come out of the amplified splitter and where would they go? Right now that splitter is plugged into a power outlet. I assume there is some way that I would get power into the outside box?

    Thanks for being patient with me as I understand the various possible solutions.
     
  7. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    1) Swap the basement mini with your office mini and test it out.

    2) Not necessarily. It depends on your needs and what devices that will be attached to it. N is slower than AC, but if there is no need for speed, then N is fine. The only other issue you may have is that you AC devices may not want to switch to N mode in a seamless manner when you go to the basement.

    3) No easy way with your current runs. In the ideal situation, you have a separate run for the Cable modem to isolate it from your MoCa setup. Then you will need to have runs from the powered Amp to the main and basement if you keep it in its current location. Make sure there is a POE filter between the powered amp and the outside splitter.

    I think in KPs recommendations, you have the two way splitter outside with one leg to the cable modem and the other leg to the powered splitter located outside as well in the same box. Then you would have a run from that box to each room. Four for upstairs, one main and one basement.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  8. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    Nah...the port next to the Input is a bypass port. It's to provide internet to the modem even when the power's out. And your modem has a battery. Which none of them do. If there was a direct wire to the Modem only, it could be used for that. But the wiring diagram provided has the modem in a room with other devices.

    If you look at Port 1 on the amp, you see it's labeled for Power. The Amp would have come with a Power Inserter to Phantom Power the Amp from inside on whichever cable was near a power outlet. See the manual for the diagram.

    You'd only need to hook up the cables you're using to the amp.

    Although that Commscope Amp ought to work, the better MoCA Amp is the CSMAPDU5VPI.

    Commscope CSMAPDU9VPI 9-port HomeConnect Passive VoIP Amplifier with MoCA(NEW) 689719680866 | eBay


    https://www.commscope.com/Docs/Amplifier_Installation_II.pdf


    [​IMG]

    Again, if done carefully, you can get Comcast to do all this for you. Including replacing the amp.

    -KP
     
  9. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    Houston, Texas
    You should check and document your current MoCA Levels. Like you did at the top of the thread.

    You can log in to your Modem and see your DOCSIS Levels. That's (usually) available at:

    http://192.168.100.1

    Signal levels between ~ -8dB and +10dB are all 'in the green' as far as signal levels go. Your TiVo Tuners report a similar level. Your Upstream power level should be in the 40's. If it's in the 50's, that's a good reason to use to get Comcast to come out (and do the wiring reconfiguration).

    If there's questions about your Download Speed, always plug a ethernet cable in to your Router and run a speed test.

    You almost for sure want AC WiFi. It's LOTS better. Not just for speed, but for connection, too.

    -KP
     
  10. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    The question I have which I do not know the answer, is that bypass port insulated from MoCa signals that are on the other ports.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  11. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure, either.

    I read an article that it might be, but it's literally the same circuit as a 2-port splitter.

    The MoCA version amp is a better choice.

    Just check the MoCA levels and see what happens.

    -KP
     
  12. saunsaun

    saunsaun New Member

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    Nov 10, 2019
    At some point, I want to figure out how to confirm whether the device in the outside cable box is a POE filter or not.

    I took your advice and swapped the office 3 Port splitter for a MoCa 2-port that I found I had (see picture). Then I plugged the office mini in via a router Ethernet Port. After that, I rebooted the TiVo bridge, the cable modem, the router and the mini. Everything came up fine.

    While doing this, I realized that I have the 1.1 MoCa device. I could have sworn that I bought the 2.0 version when the last MoCa blew, but I guess not as I only had a TiVo Premier at that time. Does anyone see that as an issue?

    I'm not certain which columns to look at for those numbers. Also, when I look at network status, I see all TiVo devices on each DVR/mini. Do I need to check this on each of them, or just one? Attached is the modem info, from before I replaced the splitter and rebooted everything tonight. I grabbed the same data after, but it was right after the reboot, so I wasn't sure the numbers would be meaningful.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 11, 2019
  13. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    ALL your power levels are dang low.

    If a Comcast Tech was out there, he wouldn't be able to close the ticket with them like that. The App wouldn't let him.

    -10dB is outside spec Downstream and +50 is outside for Upstream.

    I'd bet if you rearranged things, you could easily increase those by 3.5dB.

    If you called Comcast and presented a story about poor reception or something, you could get them out there to do it.

    -KP
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2019
  14. saunsaun

    saunsaun New Member

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    KP, I've got to tell you, you have a lot more faith in Comcast doing what you want than I do! I have called Comcast out 2x in the last 7 years for issues. Both times, I received ~$200 invoices even though each technician swore up and down that the issue was on their side and I wouldn't get a bill. What follows is many phone calls and hours arguing with them that I shouldn't be billed. My neighbor had the exact same experience. Between our 3 invoices, only once did I manage the get the charge removed. Also, you never know who you will get and how knowledgeable they are. I can't even fathom how I would convince them to put the right model powered splitter in the outside box and set everything up properly to accomplish my goals. I would rather do it myself, but the power part of the splitter is over my head. Yes, it is plugged into an outlet in the attic. I don't understand how that works in my cable box outside. That is the only thing preventing me from buying the part and doing it myself.
    But, I'm game to try getting Comcast here and will accept any coaching you will offer. I assume the tech will want me to show my issue when they get here. Can I complain of Internet performance problems, or does it need to be about MoCa issues to get them to make the right changes? I am outside of Atlanta, since you asked earlier. Also, I am at the end of a cul-de-sac in the back of my neighborhood. I always wonder if that contributes to performance issues.
     
  15. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    Tell them that sometimes the Modem will randomly start re-flashing the Up/Down/Connected lights before they lock on again.

    Do you have the power inserter for the Amp?

    -KP
     
  16. saunsaun

    saunsaun New Member

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    Nov 10, 2019
    I kept reading the part about the power inserter in your original thread and just couldn't understand what you were saying. Also I didn't see anything about a power inserter in the links that you gave. Now, I understand that you are saying it is another part. There is no other part in the Attic, other than the splitter, the coax cables, and the connection to the power outlet.
     
  17. kpeters59

    kpeters59 Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    The diagram is in the manual...link above.

    For $21 you can have another one at the door...

    -KP
     
  18. saunsaun

    saunsaun New Member

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    Nov 10, 2019
    I have no problem buying it and doing it myself if I am capable and it will improve my performance. Just to clarify, will it improve tv AND internet/wifi performance, or is this just for MoCa improvements? Is this the configuration you are recommending in my outside box?
    Screenshot_20191112-104413_Dropbox.jpg

    Where does the AC adapter plug in?
     
  19. jmbach

    jmbach der Neuerer

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    It can be plugged in anywhere there is a coax port nearby. For example, the power injector could be in your office and the adapter plugs into the wall nearby. You just need to make sure the coax wire from your office goes to the right port in the amplifier/splitter and that the power injector is oriented correctly.
     
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  20. fyodor

    fyodor Active Member

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    I think that fixing your splitter situation should hopefully fix the issues you are having with MoCA and the weak signals to your cable modem, which are probably messing up your wifi.

    The idea behind a power injector is to power an outdoor splitter that's located in a place without a plug. So one of the coax cables on the splitter labeled "power in" goes to a room where you plug in the AC adapter. The AC adapter sends power to the splitter over the coax.
     
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