BBCA cut out 1/3 of Graham Norton Show?

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Idearat, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. Idearat

    Idearat Active Member

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    Gilroy
    I watched last night's Graham Norton Show and was surprised to find that Taio Cruz, listed as the musical guest, wasn't shown. Only after that I noticed they'd shortened the show from 1hr to 45mins.

    I looked online and downloaded the episode and it was 45mins without commercials and included Cruz.

    This was baffling for a couple reasons. The only reason I noticed that something was missing was the guide data showed Cruz as performing. When I watched the downloaded copy I could see that it wasn't just cut out of the BBCA version, but the BBCA cut had different editing, using different camera shots to keep Cruz from showing on the couch during the red chair segment.

    Looking at guide data most of the repeated older episodes are at in a 1hr timeslot, one is 50mins and next weeks "new" episode is 45min again. (Last night's show is not repeating in the next week ) Best I can tell, The Fades which plays just before Graham Norton runs 1hr 15mins so they decided to just lop off 15mins from the next show to make room.
     
  2. TonyTheTiger

    TonyTheTiger Pro Troll Magnet

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    Welcome to BBCA - and the reason most people who watch British shows prefer to download them than watch on BBCA!

    There is no reasoning behind it. Top Gear, for example, is cut and the news and sometimes whole features are removed.

    The other reason these shows are downloaded is that they are much better quality as BBCA HD in NOT available on D*!
     
  3. Idearat

    Idearat Active Member

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    Gilroy
    Usually I download to get shows that air in the UK way before the US. I knew some bits were cut out of Doctor Who, but usually didn't seem so bad. But losing a full 1/3 of the show was too much for them to hide.

    It's funny, I re-watched the end of last night's show and when they did the camera pullback showing the full stage you see Cruz sitting on the couch. I wonder if anyone will think it's odd that the whole show only had 3 white guys on the couch, but at the end there's a black guy sitting at the end who hadn't been seen before.
     
  4. nirisahn

    nirisahn Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    they do this all the time to Graham Norton's show so they can run Fades, or Doctor Who, or whatever is on before it over an hour.
     
  5. taronga

    taronga Member

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    Don't forget PBS - they're just as guilty. All of the Masterpiece shows are edited for time, each missing 5-10 minutes. But I suppose it works for PBS as they can advertise the Downton Abbey DVDs as containing the original uncut UK version.
     
  6. That Don Guy

    That Don Guy Now with more GB

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    Nothing new about this - episodes of The Two Ronnies were cut from 45 minutes to 30 (usually by removing guest performances), and this goes back at least 30 years. (Probably the only reason Dave Allen's shows didn't get the same treatment was, the entire 45 minutes of each episode was pretty much the same thing, so each 45-minute episode was cut into two 23-minute episodes by duplicating the closing credits.)
     
  7. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I thought there were U.S and original British version DVDs.. (I've never seen the show.)

    But this is typically just like all other reruns -- they're cut. BBC America is essentially running them like syndicated reruns -- cutting tons out to air more commercials.

    (I think I've only rarely watched a whole -- or rather edited -- episode of this show, but
    several of my autorecording wishlists catch musical guests from older episodes. One of the Dr. Who special(s) is I think the only time I've watched whatever aired here as a whole episode.)
     
  8. cheesesteak

    cheesesteak Meh. TCF Club

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    15 mins...
    BBCA sucks
     
  9. ThePennyDropped

    ThePennyDropped Now I get it.

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    It's a shame they don't just rebroadcast the BBC here as cable/satellite stations. Enough people have dvrs that the time zone difference wouldn't be a big deal.
     
  10. TonyTheTiger

    TonyTheTiger Pro Troll Magnet

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    The BBC is funded by a license system. In the UK, you must have a license to watch TV, which goes to the BBC and all shows have no commercial breaks and no other paid advertising. There is no such system in the US.

    BBCA works in a similar way to any US cable channel, funded by advertising. Therefore it is necessary to break up the shows for commercial breaks. Most, but not all, BBC shows are 27 (ish) or 50 minutes long, but specialist shows like Top Gear can be an hour or more. This makes scheduling difficult here because everything needs to start on the hour or half-hour or the average American would get confused!

    Still, doesn't explain why shows are cut to heck - and why some of the main shows on BBCA are Battlestar Galactica, X Files and Star Trek:TNG!
     
  11. Idearat

    Idearat Active Member

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    Gilroy
    What's funny is that Graham Norton only ran 45mins, so there was a show transition at the 15min point. So it appears to have been done to make room for another show as opposed to making room for commercials.

    Once upon I time I would download Graham Norton to watch a week or two ahead of the US airing. One time I watched the downloaded version, then the BBCA version and the BBCA version wasn't cut. But, there were some words bleeped out of the original version that were not bleeped in the BBCA copy. This moved me to just waiting and watching it on BBCA. After last week I'm going back to the download route.
     
  12. ThePennyDropped

    ThePennyDropped Now I get it.

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    Um, yes. Don't most Americans know this? But wouldn't the fee passed on to cable channels by local cable companies be roughly equivalent in terms of dollar amount to the license fee?
    I haven't watched it in 20 years, but when I used to have it, HBO didn't have commercials. I don't think Showtime does, either. Or at least it didn't used to. There are probably other premium channels that survive that way, although since I'm always watching those British shows, I never subscribed to them. ;) Or do those channels have commercials now?
    True. But given that due to time zone differences, popular shows would start very late at night/early in the morning anyway and so most programming would be watched via time-shifting through the use of dvrs, I don't think a show starting at 10 minutes past the hour would really be that much of a difficulty.
    Well, obviously it's because some actors on those shows were British or had at least consumed a nice cup of tea at some point in their lives. :D ;)
     
  13. TonyTheTiger

    TonyTheTiger Pro Troll Magnet

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    Obviously not - hence the need for commercials.

    HBO, Showtime, etc. are premium channels and charge a LOT more than basic cable subscriptions. They are funded by this much higher rate and are able to do so commercial free.

    Time-shifting is not yet an acceptable broadcast model. Programming still has to be viable "in the real world" where 'live' audiences are measured. DVRs are still in the minority in that real world.

    Possibly! :D
     
  14. mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    With an a la carte model, I would gladly pay something in the range of premium channels, even ones that showed "broadcast" shows without commercials, even though I have DVRs.. Just an easier way to watch unaltered programming.
     
  15. gastrof

    gastrof Hubcaps r in fashion

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    The actual BBC could still be aired at the same relative hour it's aired (that is, its programming is aired) in the UK by delaying the broadcast. (Would it be six hours later, for the Eastern US?) Plenty of cable channels in the States have a second feed which is identical to the Eastern feed, but airs exactly three hours later, and is meant for the West Coast.

    __________________
    Typhoid, rabies, and malaria, but no sign of a stapler.
     
  16. ThePennyDropped

    ThePennyDropped Now I get it.

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    I agree with you. I know I'm not a typical American cable tv customer, but I'd gladly pay extra to receive the BBC (but I won't pay for HBO, Showtime or any of the other premium channels).
     
  17. That Don Guy

    That Don Guy Now with more GB

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    Of course, you have to keep in mind that there is more than one "BBC" channel. BBC1 and BBC2, I know, and there may be others (although they may not be over-the-air channels).

    And getting back on topic (sort of), I remember that when BBC America first appeared, it aired the 1994 season of Mastermind (complete with reminders that the show was from 1994 when they aired episodes with instructions on how to apply for being a contestant), and they aired the final in its entirety even though it ran a few minutes long.
     

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