Are broadcast networks becoming advertising vehicles for streaming services?

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by CaymanS, Mar 5, 2021.

  1. Mar 5, 2021 #1 of 47
    CaymanS

    CaymanS New Member

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    Seems to me that the "New, must see" shows are going to only be available on streaming services and the broadcast networks are there to promote them.
    Soon cable and satellite will have the same type of content that the OTA subchannels are currently broadcasting 70s sitcoms and B-grade movies. Not good for the viewer that likes to browse and Chanel surf.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Mar 5, 2021 #2 of 47
    sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    So it would seem. I almost feel like, and I hope I'm wrong, that regular tv channels will disappear in lieu of all streaming.

    I much prefer having the majority of what I watch coming off network or cable tv. But then, I don't get a vote. :(

    I find it profoundly annoying all the pushing they do to get people to sign up to the various '+'
    channels. Good thing for Tivo. I'm either watching something recorded or I'm watching semi-live so I can FF or skip through them.
     
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  3. Mar 5, 2021 #3 of 47
    Allanon

    Allanon Well-Known Member

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    I see broadcast networks keeping their morning , daytime, and news programming but during primetime showing year old original content from their streaming service. CBS already did this with Star Trek Discovery and Good Fight. If you don't want to pay then wait a year and watch it for free.
     
  4. Mar 5, 2021 #4 of 47
    Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    It's interesting in that I see the linear premium channels starting to do the same thing. For example HBO used to have a new movie every Saturday night. Now it seems the premier them on HBO Max. The last few Saturday nights they've had some old movies on. Kind of disappointing, but then again, I have HBO Max, so I can always find it there. I'm still very old fashioned in my TV viewing. While I have various streaming services, I still have linear TV as my go to.
     
  5. Mar 5, 2021 #5 of 47
    mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    But if you have HBO you already have HBO Max.

    I for a VERY long time have thought most channels were "pointless" except for prime time. That's because I *rarely* watch reruns, at least from network TV shows, since I know they're hacked up for even more commercial time, so I'm not seeing the entire show.

    I make exceptions to that for some of the basic cable channels, when I find a new show, I will sometimes record the old ones -- with the expectation that they might not be entire shows. (Like I found various Discovery shows within the past year or so, e.g. Mysteries of the Abandoned, the archaeology show that originally was on Travel but is now on Discovery.. and various History Channel documentaries... Though for all of those, I would seriously consider briefly subscribing IF I could watch the old eps of shows faster than realtime to catch up and make sure I'd seen all of them.)

    So basically, I guess I agree with you, but ever since I've been recording stuff (late 80s for some stuff, early 90s for most of what I watch, last ~20 years for ALL that I watch), non-original airings are _mostly_ just dead air as far as I am concerned.
     
  6. Mar 5, 2021 #6 of 47
    NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    The main reason that HBO isn't premiering new movies on some Saturday nights now is just because they've run out of them due to the pandemic. There just weren't a lot of new movies from WB, Universal and 20th Century (their major studio suppliers) released in 2020, so HBO is having to now feature re-runs on Saturday nights of older films like Argo and The Book of Eli.

    I guess they could opt to debut their new 2021 WB theatrical films on HBO but they've decided to exclusively offer them (outside of theaters) in the HBO Max app. It's a strong tool to get HBO subscribers to activate their free HBO Max app. I think the long-term goal is to shift more and more HBO viewing away from the linear cable channels and over to the HBO Max app. It wouldn't surprise me if they killed off some of those secondary HBO linear channels such as HBO Signature and HBO Zone before long.
     
  7. Mar 6, 2021 #7 of 47
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Well-Known Member

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    The supply of new movies for any venue is becoming quite scarce due to the pandemic. Just check local movie theaters in your area, assuming any of them are actually open, and most of the movies being shown are re-releases of old movies.
     
  8. Mar 6, 2021 #8 of 47
    Eddie501

    Eddie501 Member

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    I much, much prefer to get my programming from streaming. The picture & sound are usually better, there's often a commercial free option if the service itself isn't commercial free, and the screen is not plastered with logos, hashtags, and promos for other shows. As far as I'm concerned broadcast & cable can go back to what it's really always been.....a method to sell products. Including streaming services.
     
  9. Mar 8, 2021 #9 of 47
    Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I definitely considered that the Pandemic could be the main reason that there's just not a lot of new content for Saturday Night. I supposed they could show new series there. We'll see if this changes once things move back to normal.
     
  10. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I agree to some extent. But while linear TV sells products, the streamers sell themselves. The experience may be better, because, as you say lack of ads. But you are PAYING for that privilege. But we are already seeing this change on the streamers already. Some examples are:

    Hulu of course offers a streaming with ads option. So that has not entirely gone away. HBO Max has made it clear recently that they will be offering a streaming with ads option. And of course the streamers who are offshoots of linear channels, Paramount+, Peacock, ESPN+ and so forth all offer ad based options, which you are STILL going to pay something for. Just like early cable where stations had limited or no commercials in some cases, once these networks realize that they can easily monetize via ads, it's quite possible that ad free content might be limited or go away.

    We also have Amazon and even Netflix have ads (of other shows) ahead of their shows. It's still ads. But I get the no bugs, no middle of the show banners popping up. It's a better experience.
     
  11. jamesbobo

    jamesbobo with a grain of salt

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    And because of the pandemic, CBS probably aired Star Trek Discovery and The Good Fight because there was so little new programming to fill their time slots.
     
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  12. cheesesteak

    cheesesteak Meh. TCF Club

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    It seems like the main purpose of the Discovery family of channels is to promote the Discovery+ streaming service. They constantly break into their regular broadcast shows with crawls and message blocks promoting this Discovery+ show or that.
     
  13. sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    Also, one thing I'm seeing particularly on the ID channel is that there haven't been new episodes of shows because they've moved them all to the streaming channel. I've watched these shows for many years and it sucks that they are just moving them all. I already pay for cable because I like the variety of so many channels. I'm not going to pay for that, too, so they stopped getting my business. I guess the plan is to just kill off their broadcast channels entirely. They probably know more than I as to what works so, good luck - or whatever.
     
  14. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I hate to say it, but this is the future we are going to have to deal with. Remember, these new streaming services are completely controlled by these networks. The only "middleman" is the device owners like Roku, Amazon, Apple and so forth. I'm sure this model will work more toward the content providers than the current model with cable companies. Eventually they will move anything worthwhile to these services and their cable channels will consolidate. We are already seeing this with Comcast, who announced that they are doing away with NBCSN, and I'll bet that other channels that get horrible ratings are going to be axed too. So instead of Comcast having 6 or 7 cable channels, they'll have 2. I'd imagine we'll see the same with Discovery and Viacom and others. And the new, premium content will be moved to streaming. And then, as a consumer, we'll have to figure out which of these we really want. Remember when lots of cable subscribers were clamoring for a la carte pricing? I think this infrastructure is giving us just that.
     
  15. sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    At least one thing that I respect is like the HBO situation. If you already pay for HBO, then you get their streaming service w/o paying more. If the others did that, it would be fine. Or they could just be upfront and honest and say that they are killing off their broadcast channels in lieu of the new streaming.

    Cable is costly but many people are willing to pay because of the massive choices. I'd feel like a fool paying for cable AND paying for a bunch of streaming services from some of those same channels.

    Maybe I'm just old. :D
     
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  16. Hoffer

    Hoffer Eat Lightning ----- Poo Thunder TCF Club

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    I really like the no commercial world of streaming. I know you could fast forward thru commercials with a DVR, but it got to the point where I hated even dealing with that. I have a DVR hooked up to an OTA antenna, but I never use it. I just want to stream everything.

    If the day comes that they stop offering ad free streaming, I'll be really pissed.
     
  17. sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    I guess I understand. But, taking for example the ID channel I mentioned (and there are others obviously), we pay for this channel in our cable package yet there are no more new episodes of all those shows because they've moved them all to the streaming service. So, they just need to completely kill off the channel and people no longer pay for it if it's nothing but reruns, in lieu of streaming where all the shows went.
     
  18. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey TCF Club

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    I read about what NBC/Universal (Comcast) is doing with USA Network. USA Network used to have a lot of new shows, but over time that has diminished. A lot of new content has gone to other places, etc. So right now USA Network has become endless re-runs of L&O and old movies cut to shreds. It's unwatchable. They are aware of this, so they are moving sports back to USA Network, which was actually it's origin back in the 1980s when it was the Madison Square Garden Network. But at one time or another it used to have NHL Hockey, MLB Baseball and other sports. I think we are heading to a large consolidation of cable channels. There's just not enough content to feed there AND streaming. And that will further erode people wanting cable, which is exactly what they want to happen. And with that, advertisers will follow and start to pay more on streamers. And once that happens, they will do away with the "no ads" tier or charge so much for it that it becomes only the wealthy who can afford it (as AT&T is saying).
     
  19. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    I guess HBO wants to keep with its longstanding practice of "Saturday night = movie night" and "Sunday night = big original series night".

    Here's a list of movies that were released in 2020 or 1Q 2021 (in order of original release date) that should be arriving on HBO later this year. Note that recent Warner Bros. films, starting with Wonder Woman 1984, are streaming on HBO Max for 30 days coinciding with their theatrical release but should be returning back to HBO & HBO Max for a normal multi-month window several months later, as per usual.

    Deep Blue Sea 3
    Tenet
    The Personal History of David Copperfield
    Cats & Dogs 3: Paws Unite!
    Tremors: Shrieker Island
    The Empty Man
    Come Play
    Let Him Go
    All My Life
    Half Brothers
    News of the World
    Fatale
    Wonder Woman 1984
    Promising Young Woman
    The Little Things
    Judas and the Black Messiah
    Land
    Tom & Jerry
    Boogie
    Nobody
    Godzilla vs. Kong
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2021
  20. NashGuy

    NashGuy Well-Known Member

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    That will never happen. Streamers would be leaving too many potential subscribers and too much money on the table by not offering a more expensive ad-free version of their service.

    The head-scratcher to me is Netflix, who says that they'll never offer a cheaper ad-free tier. I mean, clearly Netflix is not a "premium" service, they're a big, broad mainstream service that tries to offer a little of something for all tastes and demographics. So it's not like offering a cheaper, ad-supported tier would hurt their brand (which, IMO, is a real concern with an ad-supported version of HBO Max).
     

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