Anybody want to explain Usenet to me like I'm seven?

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by cheesesteak, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. DUDE_NJX

    DUDE_NJX Well-Known Member

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    Frugal has been really great. $3/month unlimited, and high retention.
     
  2. MikeMar

    MikeMar Go Pats

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    Yeah frugal is great, gets 95% of stuff no problem, get some random movies/tv shows eps that won't work and I have to try a few versions but no prob
     
  3. laria

    laria Librocubicularist

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    I mostly use my account for very small files, I don't think I'm ever going to get through the 1 TB block I got from Astraweb forever ago. :)

    Actually I just checked, I got the block in August 2012 and I still have 950 GB remaining. :)
     
  4. dfreybur

    dfreybur Active Member

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    I used to use eternal-september but eventually I was no longer willing to download a newsreader. I no longer read my groups every year but the last bunch of times I just used the web interface to google groups and selected newsgroups. All the usual problems of not having any filtering but so few attack UseNet any more it hardly matters.
     
  5. GoPackGo

    GoPackGo Well-Known Member

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    I wish someone could explain the economics of Usenet hosting to me. It seems like there is so much data being added everyday, that it grows exponentially, and you’d always be adding more space to keep up with the growth.
     
  6. MikeMar

    MikeMar Go Pats

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    Like the server that is hosting the content?

    Answer - storage is cheap
     
  7. robojerk

    robojerk Well-Known Member

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    I remember hearing somewhere that when you're moving a lot of data, the cost per gigabyte from server to client becomes less than 1¢.
     
  8. MikeMar

    MikeMar Go Pats

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    I think he's talking more about the storage amount to hold all the files to start with
     
  9. dfreybur

    dfreybur Active Member

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    Usenet comes from a time when folks ran it because they had a data center for other reasons. Data centers keep upgrading technology. The best for production. The previous generation for backup and development. Two generations back got assigned to whatever the IT folks wanted to do, so those got to be NNTP Usenet servers. In other words it was done free at universities and such. I had friends at JPL and Caltech who had usenet servers as I started my civilian career there long ago when this was the state of Usenet.

    Eventually people were willing to pay subscription fees for Usenet so it became worth having servers run it. Generally only companies that did hosting had the facilities. The current terms for that are co-location and cloud but long ago the term was rack space. Now there's a company named Rackspace that no longer actually rents space in data center racks. My day job is supporting enterprise data centers that are big enough to have their own space in racks.

    But time passed and technology evolved. In a web enabled world few are willing to install a package to use anything. I am no longer willing to install a Usenet client on my company issued laptop and I no longer keep a personal server active at home. Subscription income for Usenet service has dropped steadily for over a decade now. The economics are that there is no longer the customer base for Usenet.

    There was a time when the world's best experts at pretty much anything were on Usenet. I was active on comp.unix.admin and some others. People in the instant pot or sous vide threads would have been on rec.feed.cooking or rec.food.cooking.equipment. RFC is the only newsgroup I followed that's still active.

    But that was before web forums and facebook groups were invented. Now the world's best experts are on forums. I am active on linuxquestions.com, here, a Masonic forum and so on. Now the best social connectivity is on facebook groups. I stay a fossil active on LinkedIn instead. So Usenet as a service slowly ages and withers.

    Usenet has some moderated groups. I am moderator of record for two defunct groups. I am on the active moderation team for two infrastructure groups - I have not even logged into the interfaces in over a year at this point. I just get occasional junk mail about someone sending spam to one of them. To be able to moderate groups I need to know a fair bit about newserver administration so I used to be an expert at it. Now it's not even on my resume any more.
     
  10. smbaker

    smbaker Well-Known Member

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    In many cases, retention may be limited. Pulling up one of the major providers, Giganews, for example, says 3+ years for binaries. While even that sounds like an astounding amount of data, it's still a factor that may constrain the amount of growth, and at some point (if piracy via torrent becomes more popular than piracy via Usenet and interest in the Usenet declines) could even begin to contract.

    In most commercial online storage situations, you'd be in hot water if you lose a customer's data. However, much of what's on the Usenet is not lawful content, so it's not clear what redundancy guarantees they need to provide. If a hard drive fails and you lose a week's worth of 2015's stolen music, who is going to complain? If redundancy is relaxed, then that could significantly cut down storage concerns as well.

    Plus, as others have said, storage is very cheap.

    I remember when the Usenet was the place to go to for discussion, and the source of knowledge. If you had a question, the Usenet was where you'd post it, and you'd often get an answer within minutes... and connectivity was usually provided by your ISP. The times sure have changed.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2018 #1791 of 1871
    HerronScott

    HerronScott Well-Known Member

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    Any opinions on a replacement for SickBeard? I looked a few years ago but seems like there are a number of options/forks now. SickRage, SickChill, Medusa, Sonarr… (more?).

    Scott
     
  12. Nov 6, 2018 #1792 of 1871
    Malcontent

    Malcontent Ancient Astronaut Theorist

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    Sonarr - Dive in

    Sonarr has been working great for me for the last several years.
     
    tlrowley likes this.
  13. Nov 6, 2018 #1793 of 1871
    Jeff_in_Bklyn

    Jeff_in_Bklyn Active Member

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    Sonarr the the way to go these days.
     
  14. Nov 7, 2018 #1794 of 1871
    robojerk

    robojerk Well-Known Member

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    Sonarr
     
  15. Nov 7, 2018 #1795 of 1871
    HerronScott

    HerronScott Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone for the recommendation!

    Scott
     
  16. Nov 7, 2018 #1796 of 1871
    dfreybur

    dfreybur Active Member

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    I gave up on loading a newsreader on my laptop. The view through Google Groups may not support any type of filtering but there's only one group I follow annually that still gets traffic. rec.food.cooking.

    Usenet in general was killed by trolls and spammers then once the traffic dropped towards zero even they left. To paraphrase the season 3 Babylon 5 intro - Usenet was our last great hope for free speech. It failed. But it became our hope for moderation.
     
  17. logic88

    logic88 Well-Known Member

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    Looks like PFMonkey is dead? Any other good indexing sites available?
     
  18. Malcontent

    Malcontent Ancient Astronaut Theorist

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    Yeah, the Admin announced 2 weeks ago that he was shutting down the site. He didn't have the free time to maintain it anymore.

    For a good indexer your going to have to pay a subscription of around $10-$12 a year. There a few that need an invite but their are still some that are open to new people.

    There are a couple of decent ones that are open. They have been around for 5+ years.

    NZBgeek

    Their website can be a little sluggish but they have good releases. They are going to be running a Black Friday deal on their subscriptions. They have nice community forum on their site.

    Login - NZB Finder | Hi-Def Usenet!

    It's a reliable site that also has good releases. It's fast and dependable. The website has a clean design.

    You can sign up to both and take a look around and see if you like them or not.
     
  19. vertigo235

    vertigo235 Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    nzbgeek is a good one, +1 for that one
     
  20. The Spud

    The Spud Rather be cruising TCF Club

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