Another OTA DVR Coming...

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by tommiet, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Jan 8, 2019 #1 of 23
    tommiet

    tommiet Active Member

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  2. Jan 8, 2019 #2 of 23
    wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    SiliconDust built the Simple TV Dual Tuner DVR. It was a disaster and put Real Simple Software out of business. One of the concessions to RSS refugees was that SD offered an inexpensive upgrade to their Extend. I upgraded two. It's an OK tuner and their DVR software is OK too, but Amazon and Tablo TV are going to be tough competition for these. What is missing is a standalone DVR which requires no service. Channel Master's DVR+ was the right DVR in the wrong hands. Hopefully, someone will pick up that ball. I would LOVE to see TCL enter the fray. Their Roku TVs already support trick play using a USB drive. No reason not to give recording a go.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2019
  3. Jan 8, 2019 #3 of 23
    PSU77

    PSU77 Member

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  4. Jan 8, 2019 #4 of 23
    mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    SD's current DVR software is also a disaster. Guide is terrible, and functions are confusing and few. If they're just putting their app as-is in a streaming box with storage, I don't think it will succeed.

    Amazon Recast doesn't require any service.
     
  5. Jan 8, 2019 #5 of 23
    wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    It does. The cost of the service is included in the purchase price. No internet, no DVR.
     
  6. Jan 8, 2019 #6 of 23
    tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Well-Known Member

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    There's no evidence people who watch OTA want dvr's, which should worry every manufacturer. It's a niche market and there will be a shakeout. When the smoke clears it will be Tivo,Tablo, and Amazon. Silicon dust has supported cable cards in the past so they might make it. If your sole business is OTA you'll be DOA. Remember Simple TV ?
     
  7. Jan 8, 2019 #7 of 23
    mattack

    mattack Well-Known Member

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    There's no info about how many tuners.

    I personally am not (really) interested in an OTA DVR.. though (as I've said many times) the majority of stuff I watch is from the broadcast networks.. I do watch cable stuff too..

    but I am glad there's competition.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2019 #8 of 23
    Mikeguy

    Mikeguy Well-Known Member

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  9. Jan 8, 2019 #9 of 23
    reneg

    reneg Well-Known Member

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    Looks like two tuners from the SiliconDust press release for the Scribe Duo - Press Releases - Silicon Dust

    I'm interested in more than just OTA. I find the Premium TV (cable channels) subscription from SiliconDust interesting in that it could give my spouse cable channels she wants to watch and would allow me local storage/access to content offline. I'd love to find a way to kick Xfinity to the curb and save some money, but W.A.F. is strong with Tivo. Spouse has already given the thumbs down to Plex.

    If SiliconDust UI/Software/Guide were decent, I could see buying the other SiliconDust product announced, Servio, for local DVR storage for the spouse and a couple HDHomeruns Quattros, one for OTA and one for Premium TV. I'd still run Plex for myself and the rest of my family for remote access and offline viewing.
     
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  10. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    Hmm... my Recast still mostly works without internet. I can still record, playback and watch live TV. I'm just missing guide data. But I thought by "service", you meant paid DVR service (guide, etc.), not internet service, since you said, "standalone online DVR". If you need a DVR without internet, your choices are extremely limited. I think the only such box you could still buy today would be an iView, which I think is your point. I would say the vast majority of us have internet service these days, making the internet dependency a non-issue.
     
  11. wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    Not sure why the fingers added online, but I watched carefully as they removed it.

    Some people don't have high speed internet. My in-laws have neither high speed internet nor landline. They have an antenna for television and cell phones for everything else. The DVR+ provides them with a nice grid guide, trick play, and recording. In another room, they have a TCL Roku TV which does trick play and has a guide with no service. We installed an antenna and a DVR+ at my sister's camp which does not even have cell service.

    I'm hoping TCL adds DVR functionality down the road or introduces a standalone DVR.
     
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  12. hapster85

    hapster85 Well-Known Member

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    Two tuners is just not enough. Four tuners in my Roamio OTA is barely enough, at times. I saw no mention of how viewing in multiple rooms is handled, either.
     
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  13. reneg

    reneg Well-Known Member

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    Two tuners is not enough for me either. SiliconDust can dis-aggregate the tuners from the DVR storage, so if you need more tuners, buy another tuner box. The Scribe Duo is a tuner + DVR storage box. The Servio is a DVR storage box. They already sell dual & quad OTA tuner boxes without storage.

    The other thing about the SiliconDust boxes is that they don't connect to your TV. They hang off the network. Viewing on the TV (or client) side is handled by apps on Android, Fire TV, PC or other devices. IMHO, it's a better architecture than Tivo's, but Tivo is ahead on the software side.
     
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  14. atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Well-Known Member

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    Right now in my family my sister watches OTA without a DVR, my brother has a Roamio OTA, my mother has a Roamio OTA, and I have a Bolt and pretty much every other model TiVo that recorded OTA. So that is 75% of my families households who use a DVR to record OTA. For apps my mother does not use any, my sister has a Roku TV and uses some regularly, my brother doesn't use apps allot but has used them on his Roamio, and I use them on my Bolt, a Roku, and a PC connect to my TV - mostly YouTube via the PC.

    More OTA DVR options is a good thing - to a point. I agree it is a niche market and my guess it can not support more than 2-3 options.
     
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  15. wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    I'm just concerned that the Tablo TV DVR is going to be a casualty of the increased competition. As whole house goes, they are doing a pretty good job and, although I don't own one, I want their DVR as an option going forward.
     
  16. ric hardt

    ric hardt Member

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    Since Tivo can't seem to figure out streaming they should buy TabloTV and integrate the streaming features. ;)
     
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  17. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    On advantage SD has is they offer a skinny bundle service, with some of the most watched basic cable channels, that can be recorded with their DVR. If their software doesn't suck then this could be the ultimate cord cutter solution.
     
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  18. wizwor

    wizwor Active Member

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    The 2017 census reports 126.22 million US households. Parks Associates claims 20% of these rely on an antenna for television reception. So, a little more than 25 million households which rely on broadcast television are potential DVR owners. I never see stats on OTA DVRs sold or in service. Of course, I own eight. I certainly like to record OTA. BUT, the vast majority of people I talk to who use antennas do not own or want to own a DVR. I would love to see a survey that addresses this. I suspect cost and support are the main reasons.
    Real Simple Software started out with a $500/tuner cost (DVR+service+disk) and went under after SiliconDust manufactured a POS dual tuner DVR for them. They never even sold 10,000 DVRs. Better to look at NUVVYO (Tablo TV DVR) which has a revenue of $10M/yr and 26 employees. I would pay attention to TCL. Their Roku TVs are terrific OTA televisions which require no connectivity other than an antenna to maintain a program guide and support trick play.
     
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  19. eherberg

    eherberg Active Member

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    DVR use definitely skews older. The young don't see much use for them. The number of OTA users varies depending on what survey is reported. OTA enthusiasts tend to use the Parks numbers because it is higher than others, but Nielsen, for example, has it just under 14%, I believe. CCN (who I don't hold in terribly high regard - they're a little too chummy with Pay-TV streaming providers for my tastes) reported that their last survey had 69% of respondents not using a DVR. This was the 2nd year in a row that the majority of respondents that used OTA were not using a DVR. Hardly scientific, I know, but it does seem to match with informal results of the people I know. Those who use a DVR in my circle of acquaintances are still in the Pay-TV world. Of those who cord-cut, I don't have any people I know that added a DVR. Hell - even the house where I gifted one of my own TiVo's when I moved to Plex as my primary DVR haven't even turned it on in months. The kids in the house have no interest, and the parents are simply streaming. I'm the only person I know using a DVR of any kind with OTA television.

    My personal viewpoint is that replacing a pay-TV provider for one that simply lowered the cost and changed the delivery method to internet-based isn't really 'cord-cutting'. I did it before it was 'cool' -- about 10 years now with TiVo being (at the time) the only easy way to go down that path and still have a DVR. I was looking forward to a disruption in the entire model where content was king -- where you could simply acquire only the content you cared about without being part of subsidizing what you don't. The inclusion of pay-TV streaming into 'cord-cutting' has certainly slowed down the adoption of that model being dominant. But my hope is that since the OTT services also tend to skew older with people who still want that multi-channel pay-TV experience (and younger people not so interested -- or they see through the pay-TV tactic of re-branding their model as 'cord-cutting') - that the eventual path of the pay-TV world will still slide towards oblivion. Unfortunately - I may be too old by then to enjoy it. :)
     
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  20. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Well-Known Member

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    Content is king and to most people technology is just a tool to get it. We should all be very afraid.
     

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