After a couple decades - looks like TiVo is done for me

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by bradleys, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Actually it may not even be much cheaper, but there are important other advantages.
    And there’s more: You get rid of CableCARD’s, Tuning Adapters, DVR-related monthly fees, and — best of all — having to deal with cable companies crappy billing and rate increase headaches.

    A great irony to me is how easy it is to deal with Spectrum’s Internet service as compared with their Cable TV service. There’s just one line item on the internet bill — no taxes, no fees or anything else. I’m just hoping they don’t increase it frequently like they do for their TV service. Maybe that won’t happen in my area since Metronet is rolling out a very competitive FTTH service here.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2020
  2. bradleys

    bradleys It'll be fine....

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    I don't generally watch sports, and when I do it is at the bar. I probably watch less then total 10 channels...

    I will do something to add Local channels into my mix - either setting up the old Tivo Premier in the family room or adding a tuner that can be used by Plex and the TS4K
     
  3. Resist

    Resist Well-Known Member

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    And that's been my point, most haven't cut the cord, just replaced it. We can't just change the definition of thing, because using the correct term IS important. But is great if it saves you money. The funny thing is, you'd think by now Cable TV would be listening and give consumers what they want at a lower price point. Greed holds on to the bitter end.
     
    Bigg likes this.
  4. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    There's so much new stuff that I don't find any shortage of stuff to watch. I delete more than half of what my Roamio OTA records, and I already have the recording list trimmed down. However, having PBS, NBC, and CBS adds some great content to what I have available.

    No, I am using the correct definition. The term has been misused and abused a lot, but that doesn't mean it's correct. The correct definition is someone who does not have any MVPD or vMVPD, and instead uses some combination of OTA, OTT SVOD, free streaming, or discs.

    Getting YouTube TV is just another version of the cord. It's not practical to stream over satellite (it might work for a short period of time before you blow your bandwidth cap). DBS is also the cord, and it goes 26,000 miles through the air, so your argument about physical delivery mediums is DOA. You can't "cut the cord" and then turn around and pay almost as much for YouTube TV to deliver most of the same content.

    Cable TV doesn't cost $200/mo unless you have DirecTV with the top everything and a bunch of boxes. The delta in cost between double play and internet only for one box or a TiVo usually ends up being similar to YouTube TV now that they've jacked the rates up to $65/mo and filled the lineup with crap.

    Huh? Just about every cord cutter I've actually talked to is perfectly happy without the crap on cable, and has more than they can possibly watch. The stuff people talk about these days is on Netflix.

    Absolutely there are competitive advantages to getting all your crap linear TV through YouTube TV versus through a traditional MVPD, but it's definitely not cutting the cord, it's replacing the cord. And yes, it's often only marginally cheaper than an MVPD, sometimes not even with various promo deals.

    The issue with traditional MVPDs is that if they give customers what they want, they will be on razor thin margins, due to content provider greed, which is really the whole problem that is leading to the downfall of cable. Instead, they hold on to high-margin customers and let others leave, but that's creating a downward spiral that is going to implode eventually.
     
  5. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    I completely agree with the logic of your personal definition. But the rest of the world doesn't see it that way. Cord replacement clearly fits inside the popular definition of cord cutter. Simply declaring your definition is correct does not change the accepted definition.

    There are lots of terms whose definition doesn't jive with the literal words, but we have to accept the popular definition in order to communicate with each other. Consider the term "red head". Red heads don't literally have red hair. So if you tell me there are only 500 red heads in NYC because you consider only an unnatural bright red color to be correct, then we can't communicate since by the accepted definition, there are probably tens of thousands of red heads in NYC.

    If you want to use your own terminology like "cord replacer", that's fine. But to deny that those who replace cable with internet streaming are "cord cutters" only causes confusion.

    Oxford dictionary:
    a person who cancels or forgoes a cable television subscription or landline phone connection in favor of an alternative Internet-based or wireless service.
    "a popular way for cord cutters to view programming on their TV is with a streaming video box"

    PC Mag:
    A person who switches from a pay TV subscription (cable, satellite or telephone company) to an Internet-based streaming service such as Netflix.

    Dictionary.com:
    a person who has switched from cable, satellite, or landline to a wireless or internet connection to access television or phone service

    Techopedia.com:
    Cord cutting refers to the process of cutting expensive cable connections in order to change to a low-cost TV channel subscription through over-the-air (OT) free broadcast through antenna, or over-the-top (OTT) broadcast over the Internet.

    Idioms.com:
    One who cancels a traditional cable subscription and replaces it with other entertainment sources, such as streaming services, a la carte programming, etc.

    I could go on and on and on.
     
    dlfl likes this.
  6. PSU_Sudzi

    PSU_Sudzi Well-Known Member

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    I went to the Xfinity store today to get the Arris XG1v4 (4k) box and they don't have any in stock not do any other local stores. Only thing keeping me on TiVo for the moment. Fed up with it all.
     
  7. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Please don’t poke the bear! He’s determined to stay in his semantic wilderness.
     
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  8. krkaufman

    krkaufman TDL shepherd

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    I had a bad feeling this thread was going to spiral downward into the semantics of "cord cutting" as soon as I saw his post, but was hoping otherwise ... forgetting it was still 2020.
     
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  9. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    Cord Cutting
    Denotation
    : Putting up an antenna or satellite dish and getting rid of ISP and TV provider.
    Connotation: Firing the cable company.

    Most people use cord cutting to describe firing the cable company -- even if they still pay that cable company for high speed internet. This leads to the fuzzy math where 'cord cutters' ignore the cost of high speed internet in their savings calculation. The monthly cost of YouTube TV is $64.99 + the cost of high speed internet. The monthly cost of OTA is $0.

    In my neighborhood, Comcast is $89.99/mo for two years ($79.99 for 12 months then $99.99 for 12 months). I pay $53.00 for high speed internet. High speed internet plus YTTV would be $118/mo. A lot of people are really surprised by the math, so it's best to forget the fancy names and simply describe what you get and what it costs.
     
  10. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    Your equation is missing all those bogus fees that get tacked onto cable. That will easily bring the Comcast bill to $120. I assume you're also leaving out cable box and multi-room DVR costs either because you already paid several hundred bucks for a house full of lifetime Tivos. The DVR for YTTV is included in the price, and there are no regional sports fees, broadcast fees or other bogus fees. By the time I consider all of this, plus the fact I can share YTTV among several households, it comes out far cheaper than cable.

    It's not so much the advertised cost of cable that gets me, it's all the hidden fees the don't tell you about until you get your first bill. I used to have a $29 (regular price, not a promo) a la carte plan from my cable company plus a bundle discount for internet. Problem is the $12 broadcast fee plus the $9 regional sports fee plus the administration fee and the FCC recovery fee and the "we have a monopoly in your city, so screw you" fee. Add all that up, and Youtube is a better value.

    If cable were actually cheaper, I'd still have it, believe me.
     
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  11. Resist

    Resist Well-Known Member

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    I never understood this because Blondes aren't called Yellow Heads nor are Brunettes called Brown/Black Heads.
     
  12. Wil

    Wil Unknown Member

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    I've never been fully comfortable with the use of the word "cord" in this context. We get sloppy with words, I understand we can't always be literal or stick to old fashioned definitions, but it's not really a cord. And when you shut off service it's not really physically cutting the wiring, most people just leave the electronically shut-off wiring sitting there.

    Now I'm not saying all these people should be permanently banned from TCF for not using words exactly the way I think they should be used. A 30-60 day time out and a full apology would be acceptable.
     
  13. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    Right. Still a better deal than OTT where I live.
    If you got all those things with OTT, you would pay all those fees.
    I wouldn't. I HATE Comcast. I hate how they treat new customers better than old. I hate how deceptive they are with their prices and caveats. I fired the cable company. I just understand that the alternatives are not a panacea. When I retire, I will fire my ISP as well. Then I will have truly cut the cord and enjoy truly free tv.
     
  14. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    Except that you are completely wrong. You can cut that cord. Put up an antenna or have satellite installed and use your smart phone for internet access. Easy peasy.
     
  15. bradleys

    bradleys It'll be fine....

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    Wow! Are we still talking about the definition of “cord cutting”? Lol

    My fios connection was stupid expensive. Internet, phone, cable with HBO + two cable cards was $220 a month.


    Now I pay $50 for internet plus $35 for Sling Blue with cloud DVR (we will see how much all the extra fees end up being). That leaves me a bunch of room if I want to get HBO Max for $15 - but I will hold off until there is a new series that I actually want to watch.

    For OTA, I still have an old Premiere - but I also just ordered a used HD Homerun DUO tuner off eBay that I am going to try out.

    Did I want to cut the cable? No, I liked my setup, it worked great... But they really left me little choice.
     
  16. mdavej

    mdavej Well-Known Member

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    You'd think. But I get all my locals with OTT without that $12 broadcast fee and my RSNs without that RSN fee.
    Preach brother. I can't wait to fire my ISP. When I retire, I'm also going to drop streaming TV. I only have it so other family members can watch. I watch mostly OTA anyway.
     
  17. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    And that, my friend, is why most of us think (connotation) of cord cutting as firing the cable company. And that feels great (ten years I have been feeling great). BUT, when you are working with someone, you need to be more technically correct. Stack the nickels and pennies, discuss all the benefits and deficiencies, and decide what is best based on $ rather than getting even with Comcast.
     
  18. trip1eX

    trip1eX imo, afaik, feels like to me, *exceptions, ~aprox

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    i think there is a lot of nonsense with the term cord cutting.

    i think it's just a feel good term for downsizing. And now doesn't even necessarily mean downsizing. Just switching services sorta speak. LIke moving from to satellite because of a deal if you think about it.
     
  19. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

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    Just because a lot of people use the term incorrectly doesn't make the incorrect attempt to re-define the word suddenly correct.

    No, the confusion is people who call cord replacers cord cutters even though they are the literal opposite of a cord cutter.

    All of those definitions are lousy, not because they actually endorse the incorrect usage of the term cord cutter to include cord replacers, but rather because none of them differentiate between OTT SVOD and vMVPDs. Cord cutters can and do often subscribe to OTT SVOD, but by definition, a cord cutter cannot subscribe to a vMVPD, as then they would no longer be a cord cutter, and would be the literal opposite, a cord replacer.

    The problem is you have more fuzzy math because while OTA is free, and doesn't directly require internet, you still have to pay your internet bill for, well, internet. You do have a good point about people not counting the cost of internet in the calculation, however. Even more insidious are the bundle discounts, which often don't get counted, often making cord replacing almost as expensive or as expensive as just keeping a traditional MVPD.

    No. It's pretty well defined. As is cord stacking, cord shaving, and cord nevers. One term that should be used more is cord cheaters for people who have TVE logins from others.
     
  20. wizwor

    wizwor Guest

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    You don't. For many, their internet is something you do with your phone. No need for routers and such. One less bill. Even if you do pay for internet, you do not have to have such quality as to allow for multiple streams of video.

    My in-laws have an antenna a TCL Roku TV and a Channel Master DVR+. Their phones are not smart. They literally pay $0 for television. They have cut the cord.

    At my sister's camp, they barely have cell service and there is not high speed internet provider. They have one television on a Dish satellite receiver and the other on an antenna via a Channel Master DVR+. No ISP, no cable. They bring their satellite box to camp. So, $0/month for the camp. They have cut the cord.
     

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