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Old 06-17-2014, 12:47 PM   #1
Silverman
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Where did the PBS school lab shows go?

For many years during the weekday school hours the local PBS TV outlet would have many half hour programs for use in-school. Many were lab experiments and interesting science experiments. Now all I see is mindless drivel for 3 year olds.

I only have two of the sub channels here but they don't seem to be on those either. Did they become internet videos or what? Is there any way to find them if they are still out there? Why did PBS stop them to produce garbage, surely the lab shows were even cheaper than animated cartoons to make so it seems to make no sense. Anyone know?
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Old 06-17-2014, 02:57 PM   #2
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They went to the same place that TV Guide magazine's old format, the home of that particular notice, went.

That type of programming is still on subchannels in some areas (and full channels in others). Ask your local PBS station what happened to them.

Incidentally, I'm pretty sure 3-year-olds wouldn't consider the current programming to be "garbage."
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Old 06-18-2014, 07:28 AM   #3
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Last I checked, many of the current kids shows on PBS are quite educational, but just in a more colorful semi subtle way. My son still loves Curious George and Wild Kratts, both offer a lot of good info for kids. Many other shows do the same, offer some form of message, be it bullying, friendship, or other things like teaching them math, science and so so on. Far from "garbage" IMO.
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:47 AM   #4
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Really? I watched "Super Why?" thinking it was going to teach something. A kid asked why he no longer fits his bed and shoes are tight. It took 30 minutes to say only that it is "growing up", with no further explanation. They showed cartoon ducks getting bigger and that was it. That's like answering why do I eat with because you get hungry.

I used to see real interesting science and chemistry stuff in the daytime and some history lessons too, now it is just garbage and as I said before I think that stuff costs more to produce than just filming a teacher doing a class and is a lot easier to just film too. Where do schools get such shows now? DVD's or something? Or did they stop teaching all science and experiments now?
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Old 06-18-2014, 11:49 AM   #5
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Word Girl is probably the most educational children's show on PBS

http://pbskids.org/wordgirl/adventures/

I have never seen labs on PBS
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Old 06-18-2014, 01:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverman View Post
Really? I watched "Super Why?" thinking it was going to teach something. A kid asked why he no longer fits his bed and shoes are tight. It took 30 minutes to say only that it is "growing up", with no further explanation. They showed cartoon ducks getting bigger and that was it. That's like answering why do I eat with because you get hungry.

I used to see real interesting science and chemistry stuff in the daytime and some history lessons too, now it is just garbage and as I said before I think that stuff costs more to produce than just filming a teacher doing a class and is a lot easier to just film too. Where do schools get such shows now? DVD's or something? Or did they stop teaching all science and experiments now?
My daughter watches super why. It teaches the alphabet, spelling, and rhyming, among other things. I don't think my 3 year old daughter would get much use out of watching some teacher in a classroom do an experiment. If she would, I'd probably just have her enrolled in said class.

The stuff thats on PBS is broadcast to millions of homes, for millions of kids to watch. For the most part, the kids watching this stuff are going to be pre-kindergarten...otherwise they'd actually be in school. Your classroom-use shows might be interesting for someone of school age, but not for the little kids at home. And for the kids in school, how often are they actually going to see it? Seems like it's wasting a lot of air time for a pretty small market, which might be better served having this stuff available on DVD or internet instead.

Edit: also notice how I wasn't so condescending to suggest multiple times that the stuff you are interest in is garbage?
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Old 06-18-2014, 08:06 PM   #7
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The whole premise of this thread indicates the OP doesn't understand how PBS works. PBS doesn't create shows itself. Most shows on PBS are created by other companies (like Children's Television Workshop) or PBS affiliates (like WGBH Boston). PBS gives funding to those entities to help pay for the production of those programs and in return gets the rights for other PBS affiliates to air the programs.

Programs are usually produced with the intent to have them generate revenue. Occasionally, someone will fund a production with the knowledge that the production costs will never be recouped, but that's pretty rare.

So with that background in mind, I think the OP's question can be answered as follows: Nobody is making those programs anymore because nobody wants to watch them and therefore, there isn't a market for them.

As for how schools will continue to teach science without the use of PBS, I propose that they ask their teachers to actually teach. That doesn't seem all that complicated. I learned science in school and I don't remember a teacher ever showing us a PBS program. Frankly, I'm not sure I've ever seen the types of PBS programs that the OP is talking about. Since PBS programming is highly regional, it's possible that the OP's local affiliate made and aired the programs he's referencing, and that they were never shown in other PBS markets.
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Old 06-18-2014, 09:18 PM   #8
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I saw that they're making a 30 minute version of Sesame Street because the original is too slow!! (basically a condensed version of the original show.)
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Old 06-19-2014, 08:10 AM   #9
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I saw that they're making a 30 minute version of Sesame Street because the original is too slow!! (basically a condensed version of the original show.)
1) That will be done IN ADDITION to the full length episode
2) The primary goal of the shorter version it to make it more usable for watching on mobile device

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...618-story.html
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Old 06-19-2014, 08:12 AM   #10
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The whole point of the lab shows was to be seen by kids while in school and especially in poorer districts where they just don't have a science or chemestry teacher. Appalachia, ghetto areas, far flung rural districts many do not have the resources to do everything themselves as some said above.

I called the programming that is there now garbage because it does not teach anything, just answers questions with nonsense. Saying PBS does not make these, just funds and airs them makes no sense, if you fund something you ARE making it, of course. I don't build my own house either but that doesn't mean it isn't my doing and design.

Remember I am talking only of weekday programs, not the whole PBS network schedule. Even old Nova reruns would be better programming, if anyone wants cartoons there are what 4 or 5 cartoon channels now? Thanks all for your answers, looks like no one does know what happened, I will assume DVD and YouTube may then be what poor districts use because of the failure of PBS.
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Old 06-19-2014, 10:26 AM   #11
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Again, totally disagree that it does not teach anything. And yes there are 4 or 5 cartoon channels, but if you want to talk about non-educational junk then I think you are FAR more likely to find it there. Of the cartoon channels, I think they are all mostly far inferior to PBS as far as educational value, with the exception of Sprout (which, not coincidentally, is a joint venture with PBS).

But as far as the stuff you are interested in, have you tried looking here:
http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/coll...getyourtechon/


Quote:
Let us help you build your digital classroom.
PBS LearningMedia is here to help you better integrate digital technology and resources into your curriculum. From learning how to flip your lessons to integrating social media and tablets, you’ll find an assortment of information on this page including:

FREE Resources, Collections + Videos
FREE Archived Webinars + How-To Guides
Professional Development
Tablet Sweepstakes
Some of that stuff might be useful. Also on the left is a link to Flipped Classroom Collection. Looks like it might be semi relevant. Does that help?

And to find it, I only had to google "pbs educational classroom" and click the 3rd link.
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Old 06-19-2014, 10:30 AM   #12
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Thanks, will check it out. As far as on TV, I still think Nova reruns in daytime would teach a lot more and at no cost to PBS, they already have them.
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Old 06-19-2014, 11:04 AM   #13
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Thanks, will check it out. As far as on TV, I still think Nova reruns in daytime would teach a lot more and at no cost to PBS, they already have them.
Nova? For preschool children? Remember, 90%+ of the kids watching PBS during school hours are going to be preschoolers, because K-12 students are actually going to be in school (and not watching TV) for those hours
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Old 06-19-2014, 01:39 PM   #14
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Again, follow the money. Running 20 year old shows isn't likely to bring in new viewers and new money. PBS needs to attract viewers just like any other network, and the way you attract viewers is by airing new and unique programs that viewers can't find elsewhere. If you do this, then viewers will come, and the money will follow. But if you give up on producing new programs and just decide to air old reruns, the viewers will dry up and so will the money.
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Old 06-19-2014, 01:52 PM   #15
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Remember I am talking only of weekday programs, not the whole PBS network schedule. Even old Nova reruns would be better programming, if anyone wants cartoons there are what 4 or 5 cartoon channels now? Thanks all for your answers, looks like no one does know what happened, I will assume DVD and YouTube may then be what poor districts use because of the failure of PBS.
Because all the low-income children have parents who can afford a cable subscription.

PBS is the only freely available broadcast TV network to offer daytime children's programming, geared to the age-range of children who are actually home during the day. We'll have to agree to disagree on the quality of said programming.
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Old 06-27-2014, 03:43 AM   #16
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Old 06-27-2014, 08:06 AM   #17
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Well, that is not bad at all to teach quite a bit. I almost believed PBS had gotten better, then at the end of the clip it was from South African schools. Glad someone is using science, but it is not us.

Is this an example what PBS ought to do? Sure. Super Why never explained anything or even made sense and took 30 minutes, this clip was just a few minutes and taught how batteries work, power flows, and even how to make one yourself, big difference than explaining the entire maturing of a person as "growing up" with no further explanations.
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Old 06-27-2014, 05:09 PM   #18
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The reason for the 30 minute Sesame Street, from my perspective, is encapsulated in the statement "Ok, one more Sesame Street and then it's time for bed."


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