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Old 02-27-2012, 09:34 AM   #1
buscuitboy
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Question Series 3 repair options

I have an original Series 3 (w/ lifetime) that is having some issues. It will randomly freeze up & requires unplugging the unit in order to get it going again. At this point, I can't really seem to go that long before it freezes up on me.

I thought it might have been the hard drive & even got a hold of a Series 3 image. Haven't had time to pull the drive out yet though. At some point, I guess I will and run a test on it to see if its bad.

I read here about this model having power supply issues as well so I opened it up and looked at the capacitors on the power supply. One of them looked slightly buldged so I'm thinking this could possibly be the issue as well.

Finally, I actually also wound up talking to a TiVO rep about this issue. They had me go through some DVR diagnostics & test the cable signal strength. The person I talked to felt that the cable signal strength was too high and this was causing the unit to freeze up. They suggested I put a splitter on the line to reduce it some.

Which one of these 3 sounds like the culprit? I personally think the signal strength diagnosis is not accurate. This Series 3 was working fine for years on this line. I also recently got a Series 4/Premiere & it works flawlessly on the same connection the Series 3 was on.

I tend to wonder if its the power supply. I see Weaknees is selling power supplies for this unit for about $99, but I'm also looking on Ebay and Craigslist for some units that could be just as cheap. Could simply use it for parts & strip it for the power supply.

I guess I ultimately need to run a test on the hard drive to see what comes back on that, but since I saw a slightly buldging cap on the power supply, I wonder if this is more of the problem. Just wondering what are some issues related to a failing power supply?
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Old 02-27-2012, 10:33 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by buscuitboy View Post
I have an original Series 3 (w/ lifetime) that is having some issues. It will randomly freeze up & requires unplugging the unit in order to get it going again. At this point, I can't really seem to go that long before it freezes up on me.

I thought it might have been the hard drive & even got a hold of a Series 3 image. Haven't had time to pull the drive out yet though. At some point, I guess I will and run a test on it to see if its bad.

I read here about this model having power supply issues as well so I opened it up and looked at the capacitors on the power supply. One of them looked slightly buldged so I'm thinking this could possibly be the issue as well.

Finally, I actually also wound up talking to a TiVO rep about this issue. They had me go through some DVR diagnostics & test the cable signal strength. The person I talked to felt that the cable signal strength was too high and this was causing the unit to freeze up. They suggested I put a splitter on the line to reduce it some.

Which one of these 3 sounds like the culprit? I personally think the signal strength diagnosis is not accurate. This Series 3 was working fine for years on this line. I also recently got a Series 4/Premiere & it works flawlessly on the same connection the Series 3 was on.

I tend to wonder if its the power supply. I see Weaknees is selling power supplies for this unit for about $99, but I'm also looking on Ebay and Craigslist for some units that could be just as cheap. Could simply use it for parts & strip it for the power supply.

I guess I ultimately need to run a test on the hard drive to see what comes back on that, but since I saw a slightly buldging cap on the power supply, I wonder if this is more of the problem. Just wondering what are some issues related to a failing power supply?
Sounds like you have the options pretty well enumerated. I agree that the signal level thing is the least likely but it is also something that can be easily checked. If you don't have a spare splitter, maybe you can borrow one or pick one up cheaply. If you feel comfortable with a soldering iron (or know someone who does) replacing power supply capacitors is not difficult and a lot cheaper than a new supply. Even if you test the hard drive and it tests bad, fixing the power supply should be part of the repair process.
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Old 02-27-2012, 10:51 AM   #3
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I'm not real efficient with a soldering iron, but maybe it isn't too hard & something I can attempt. I guess if my Series 3's power supply is going bad, it's worth a shot. I figure I have nothing to lose & if I somehow mess up the soldering during the capacitor repair process, I'll just get a new power supply somewhere anyway.

If I am successful at doing it myself and putting a new/better capacitor on it, will this likely be better than getting a used power supply from somewhere else from another unit? How do I know exactly which capacitor to get? Where is a good place to get them too?

Although, if I do get another power supply from a used Series 3, I wonder if I'll just eventually have the same issue down the road. The original Series 3 is known across the board for bad power supplies, correct?

I realize they are much more expensive than a do-it-yourself project, but are the Weaknees power supplies rebuilt ones with better capacitors? Or are they simply ones pulled from working units (and therefore might eventually fail as well)? Or could it be both and a shot in the dark on what you are getting?

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Old 02-27-2012, 06:25 PM   #4
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I'm not real efficient with a soldering iron, but maybe it isn't too hard & something I can attempt. I guess if my Series 3's power supply is going bad, it's worth a shot. I figure I have nothing to lose & if I somehow mess up the soldering during the capacitor repair process, I'll just get a new power supply somewhere anyway.

If I am successful at doing it myself and putting a new/better capacitor on it, will this likely be better than getting a used power supply from somewhere else from another unit? How do I know exactly which capacitor to get? Where is a good place to get them too?

Although, if I do get another power supply from a used Series 3, I wonder if I'll just eventually have the same issue down the road. The original Series 3 is known across the board for bad power supplies, correct?

I realize they are much more expensive than a do-it-yourself project, but are the Weaknees power supplies rebuilt ones with better capacitors? Or are they simply ones pulled from working units (and therefore might eventually fail as well)? Or could it be both and a shot in the dark on what you are getting?
I kind of get the feeling from your questions that doing the capacitor replacement yourself might not be a good idea. The capacitors are marked with their value and they are polarized. That means that they have to go into the board in the correct direction (they have a plus and minus side like batteries). If you live near an urban area then you might be able to find an unsub S3 on Craigslist for less than the cost of a new supply, or check eBay (but that would include a shipping charge). Yes, a used supply may end up having the same issues. You need to ask Weaknees if they sell new or refurbished supplies.
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Old 02-27-2012, 06:49 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by buscuitboy View Post
I have an original Series 3 (w/ lifetime) that is having some issues. It will randomly freeze up & requires unplugging the unit in order to get it going again. At this point, I can't really seem to go that long before it freezes up on me.

I thought it might have been the hard drive & even got a hold of a Series 3 image. Haven't had time to pull the drive out yet though. At some point, I guess I will and run a test on it to see if its bad.

I read here about this model having power supply issues as well so I opened it up and looked at the capacitors on the power supply. One of them looked slightly buldged so I'm thinking this could possibly be the issue as well.

Finally, I actually also wound up talking to a TiVO rep about this issue. They had me go through some DVR diagnostics & test the cable signal strength. The person I talked to felt that the cable signal strength was too high and this was causing the unit to freeze up. They suggested I put a splitter on the line to reduce it some.

Which one of these 3 sounds like the culprit? I personally think the signal strength diagnosis is not accurate. This Series 3 was working fine for years on this line. I also recently got a Series 4/Premiere & it works flawlessly on the same connection the Series 3 was on.

I tend to wonder if its the power supply. I see Weaknees is selling power supplies for this unit for about $99, but I'm also looking on Ebay and Craigslist for some units that could be just as cheap. Could simply use it for parts & strip it for the power supply.

I guess I ultimately need to run a test on the hard drive to see what comes back on that, but since I saw a slightly buldging cap on the power supply, I wonder if this is more of the problem. Just wondering what are some issues related to a failing power supply?
Any bulge at all indicates you need to replace that capacitor before doing any other troubleshooting.

You'll need a replacement specifically specified as having low ESR (equivalent series resistance) and rated for 105 degrees Celsius.

After that, it's a matter of getting the same uFarad rating (I'm going to bet 2200, but it might be 3300) and the voltage rating needs to be the same as the bad one or a little higher, like if it's a 16V and you can't find that, a 25V will do.

What part of the country are you in?
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Old 02-28-2012, 08:00 AM   #6
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Personally, I'd swap the hard drive before busting out the soldering iron. It's completely reversible and easier.
You don't necessarily need a new image. If you have a computer with two spare SATA ports you can copy your image to another drive and see how it goes... which is nice because then you don't have to lose any shows, season passes, or other settings. Also I think with a new image you'd have to re-pair cablecards but that might vary with cableco.

By the way, do you have any trouble tuning from an antenna? My S3 is getting lots of problems on cable but tunes OTA just fine. The hard drive is new but I have one cap that might have a slight bulge but it's not obvious enough to tell. I think I'll check the output voltages...
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Old 02-28-2012, 08:22 AM   #7
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Personally, I'd swap the hard drive before busting out the soldering iron. It's completely reversible and easier.
You don't necessarily need a new image. If you have a computer with two spare SATA ports you can copy your image to another drive and see how it goes... which is nice because then you don't have to lose any shows, season passes, or other settings. Also I think with a new image you'd have to re-pair cablecards but that might vary with cableco.

By the way, do you have any trouble tuning from an antenna? My S3 is getting lots of problems on cable but tunes OTA just fine. The hard drive is new but I have one cap that might have a slight bulge but it's not obvious enough to tell. I think I'll check the output voltages...
If someone has been stabbed, you should probably deal with that first, before running an exhaustive battery of tests for some other medical malady, just in case the fact that they are bleeding to death interferes with getting accurate results from those other tests.

Power supply problems can cause all sorts of strange symptoms, and make any deductions about other problems a pointless waste of time and energy.

If the stabbing victim has low blood pressure you really need to deal with the wound first before wondering if the BP problem is due to them possibly having influenza or a failing heart valve.
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Old 02-28-2012, 08:25 AM   #8
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Any bulge at all indicates you need to replace that capacitor before doing any other troubleshooting.

You'll need a replacement specifically specified as having low ESR (equivalent series resistance) and rated for 105 degrees Celsius.

After that, it's a matter of getting the same uFarad rating (I'm going to bet 2200, but it might be 3300) and the voltage rating needs to be the same as the bad one or a little higher, like if it's a 16V and you can't find that, a 25V will do.

What part of the country are you in?
Look for an electronics repair shop and have them do it. I did it with bulging caps on a pc system board and they replaced 4 caps for about $25. They are much better with the soldering iron than I am.
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Old 02-28-2012, 11:24 AM   #9
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OK, I guess fixing the power supply issue should be high on the priority list no matter what. Like I mentioned, I would be willing to give the soldering a try & worst comes worst, I get a new one somewhere.

I found someone selling the same Series 3 on Craigslist in my area for about $90. This is about the same price as what Weaknees is charging for their S3 power supplies alone. Actually, Weaknees is charging $99 for a replacement, but they initially charge $149 for the part and then refund you $50 when you send your bad power supply back to them. Not sure I want to mess with all that & would just assume get a whole unit (for parts) off CL or ebay instead (although, I would have to worry about it failing again too). This move by Weaknees also tells me that they are probably "refurbishing" the ones they make available by fixing customer returns. Which I guess could be good too in that they are replacing the bad capacitors so less chance of a problem down the road.

However, I do also like the option of taking it to a electronic repair shop. I live in the Atlanta area so I'm sure there is someone here who can do it. Seems cheaper than a whole new power supply and also definitely assures that its a better one (instead of just getting one that might also fail in the future).

Now, I did happen to talk to a TiVo rep again about this issue. In addition to suggesting (like before) it could be a signal issue for the cause of rebooting, he mentioned that the cable card might be bad. I didn't think of this and it could be a 4th option. I'll have to take out the one M-card I have in it for now and see how it works under the analog channel tuner (Comcast ch2-28).

I also asked him about the power supply issue for this model and it going bad in time. He said he never heard of that. I now wonder how much stock I should put into what the TiVo techs say if they have never heard of failing power supplies in these S3s. Or maybe its something they just don't want to admit.

Which finally leaves me to something else he said. He mentioned that TiVo has an exchange program on out of warranty boxes like this, but it would essentially be $199 to transfer the lifetime sub and $149 for a new Series 3 box ($349). I'm pretty sure I would not go this route as it seems like a much more expensive option (& doesn't guarantee I will have the same issue down the road too).

Of course, this exchange option is apparently if I do NOT open the box. I didn't tell him I opened the box to look at the power supply (only asked about it from what "I heard"), but is there really any way they can tell I simply removed the cover to inspect it inside? I didn't remove or alter anything in there (although, I did use a can of air to blow out some dust while it was open). Instead, I basically just looked at the power supply and saw the one slightly buldging cap. Then closed it back up.

I guess at this point, I'll try to remove the cable card and see how it performs. I'll cross my finger that helps, but I'm not holding my breathe that it will fix it or be the solution.

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Old 02-28-2012, 11:34 AM   #10
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If someone has been stabbed, you should probably deal with that first, before running an exhaustive battery of tests for some other medical malady, just in case the fact that they are bleeding to death interferes with getting accurate results from those other tests.
Hahaha... nice. Depends on how "slightly" the caps are bulging. On mine, it's very subtle so I can't really tell if they were always like that. I don't rush to the ER when I cut myself, but if it keeps bleeding after I put pressure on it for a little while, something's up. Backing off the analogy, it seems perfectly normal to me to have a few spare 1TB drives lying around, so that's where I'm coming from
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:04 PM   #11
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Hahaha... nice. Depends on how "slightly" the caps are bulging. On mine, it's very subtle so I can't really tell if they were always like that. I don't rush to the ER when I cut myself, but if it keeps bleeding after I put pressure on it for a little while, something's up. Backing off the analogy, it seems perfectly normal to me to have a few spare 1TB drives lying around, so that's where I'm coming from
Doesn't matter how many spare brand new spark plugs you have lying around if you've got a leaky head gasket or a slipped timing chain.

Go look at this picture

http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb...33#post8824333

to see how subtle the visual difference can be between a good cap and one that's started to go bad.

When they start to go bad, it's a one-way trip. They don't get better, they just keep getting worse.
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:13 PM   #12
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That's a very helpful picture. I'm going to pop the lid on mine tonight and have another look.
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:20 PM   #13
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OK, I guess fixing the power supply issue should be high on the priority list no matter what. Like I mentioned, I would be willing to give the soldering a try & worst comes worst, I get a new one somewhere.

I found someone selling the same Series 3 on Craigslist in my area for about $90. This is about the same price as what Weaknees is charging for their S3 power supplies alone. Actually, Weaknees is charging $99 for a replacement, but they initially charge $149 for the part and then refund you $50 when you send your bad power supply back to them. Not sure I want to mess with all that & would just assume get a whole unit (for parts) off CL or ebay instead (although, I would have to worry about it failing again too). This move by Weaknees also tells me that they are probably "refurbishing" the ones they make available by fixing customer returns. Which I guess could be good too in that they are replacing the bad capacitors so less chance of a problem down the road.

However, I do also like the option of taking it to a electronic repair shop. I live in the Atlanta area so I'm sure there is someone here who can do it. Seems cheaper than a whole new power supply and also definitely assures that its a better one (instead of just getting one that might also fail in the future).

Now, I did happen to talk to a TiVo rep again about this issue. In addition to suggesting (like before) it could be a signal issue for the cause of rebooting, he mentioned that the cable card might be bad. I didn't think of this and it could be a 4th option. I'll have to take the one M-card I have in it for now and see how it works under the analog channel tuner (Comcast ch2-28).

I also asked him about the power supply issue for this model and it going bad in time. He said he never heard of that. I now wonder how much stock I should put into what the TiVo techs say if they have never heard of failing power supplies in these S3s. Or maybe its something they just don't want to admit.

Which finally leaves me to something else he said. He mentioned that TiVo has an exchange program on out of warranty boxes like this, but it would essentially be $199 to transfer the lifetime sub and $149 for a new Series 3 box ($349). I'm pretty sure I would not go this route as it seems like a much more expensive option (& doesn't guarantee I will have the same issue down the road too).

Of course, this exchange option is apparently if I do NOT open the box. I didn't tell him I opened the box to look at the power supply (only asked about it from what "I heard"), but is there really any way they can tell I simply removed the cover to inspect it inside? I didn't remove or alter anything in there (although, I did use a can of air to blow out some dust while it was open). Instead, I basically just looked at the power supply and saw the one slightly buldging cap. Then closed it back up.

I guess at this point, I'll try to remove the cable card and see how it performs. I'll cross my finger that helps, but I'm not holding my breathe that it will fix it or be the solution.
You didn't talk to a TiVo "tech", you talked to a Customer Service Representative who probably couldn't tell the power supply from the motherboard and hasn't the faintest idea what a capacitor is (It's a glorified version of a piece of wax paper between 2 pieces of aluminum foil, and it can store a charge. It's the "glorified version" part where all of the industrial secrets and differences in performance are).

You can unsolder the old one(s) and solder in (a) new one(s) for under $10 in parts.

If the TiVo still has problems after that, you know what's not causing them.

And that can be half the battle.

One of the first examples of capacitor problems in TiVo power supplies was probably in the neighborhood of a decade ago in a particular model of DirecTiVo satellite receiver and recorder where the symptom was one tuner working and the other tuner not working. Both were powered by the same section of the power supply, but one was a little further away and the electricity had to travel through a little more copper to get to it and so it didn't get quite enough current to work properly, because the power supply wasn't performing up to design specifications. If you started troubleshooting with the notion firmly fixed in your head that the power supply itself didn't matter, you'd still be looking for the problem 10 years later.

Take it to a shop and ask them how much to replace the caps on the 5 Volt and 12 Volt output rails with good low ESR high temp ones. That'll probably be the 2 or 3 or 4 tallest ones on the side nearest the motherboard.

Figure $10 to give them a generous markup on the parts, and the rest is labor, otherwise known as knowing what to do and being set up to do it.

Decide if you consider that a fair price to pay to have it over and done with.
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Old 02-28-2012, 12:27 PM   #14
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That's a very helpful picture. I'm going to pop the lid on mine tonight and have another look.
I usually try to remember to give credit to fellow TCF'er steve614 for that excellent example. Sometimes I get in a hurry.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:09 AM   #15
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Question

Well, I removed the cable card and let it run on a analog signal only. However, same problem occurred; reboots at random times and then gets hung up on the "welcome" screen. Therefore, I think my issue is the power supply and a capacitor.

I opened the unit up. I'm thinking one of the capacitors is bad. I took some pictures & here they are:






What do you think, is that one "buldged" enough to indicate failure?

I did actually find a local electronics repair place that will essentially replace the bad capacitor for about $10-15. I guess I'll have to be careful and disconnect this power supply to bring into them.

Someone on another thread also mentioned that I should probably just go ahead & have them both replaced. Since they will have it to repair the one, would that be a good thing to do as well since some of the others will most likely go bad at some point too?
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:42 AM   #16
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I think you found your problem :-)

Yeah... that's bulged enough.

In bulk I think they're less than a buck and most of the time is in setting up so I'd go ahead and have them both done... maybe all 5 but I don't know if the smaller ones are a more reliable type.
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:22 PM   #17
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Well, I removed the cable card and let it run on a analog signal only. However, same problem occurred; reboots at random times and then gets hung up on the "welcome" screen. Therefore, I think my issue is the power supply and a capacitor.

I opened the unit up. I'm thinking one of the capacitors is bad. I took some pictures & here they are:






What do you think, is that one "buldged" enough to indicate failure?

I did actually find a local electronics repair place that will essentially replace the bad capacitor for about $10-15. I guess I'll have to be careful and disconnect this power supply to bring into them.

Someone on another thread also mentioned that I should probably just go ahead & have them both replaced. Since they will have it to repair the one, would that be a good thing to do as well since some of the others will most likely go bad at some point too?
Oh, yeah, Mr. Bulged-out has got to go.

There seem to be two variations on the S3 platform power supply and yours is the other one from the one I've worked on.

If there's one capacitor that's much bigger around than the rest, say as big around as a quarter, give or take, it's probably okay.

Find out how much to replace all of the other big ones, and if it's pretty much the first quote plus 2 or 3 bucks per extra cap, go ahead and be done with it.
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:53 PM   #18
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Wink

Well, here is another picture of ALL the capacitors on the power supply. Should I get those 3 larger ones replaced and not worry about the 6 smaller ones?


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Old 03-07-2012, 04:58 PM   #19
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Do the capacitors under the heat sink look okay?

I only see a bulge on the biggest one to the left. That one definitely needs to be replaced. Just to be safe, you should also replace any other capacitor that is tied to that branch of the circuit (follow the circuit board trace).
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Old 03-07-2012, 05:19 PM   #20
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How many caps are there under the heatsink overhang?

Can you take a picture with the bundle of wires going to the motherboard and drive in the foreground?
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:19 PM   #21
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Oh, I totally missed those (under the heat sink). Here are some pics of that area. From what I can tell, they all seem to be good. See what you think:





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Old 03-07-2012, 09:30 PM   #22
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If it were my TiVo I'd replace the one bulged one, and see if that fixed things.

But I can do that myself and know how to find any others that were in parallel with it and probably overstressed when it quit working right, so I'd probably replace it/them as long as I had it open.

But in your case, probably better to get that shop to replace all of the ones in the pictures and be sure you don't have to do it again in a couple of months, provided they give you a reasonable price like a couple or three dollars per cap plus one non-extravagant labor charge.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:06 PM   #23
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So, essentially replace all 11 capacitors (if the price is reasonable)? Or should I maybe just worry & replace the 5 bigger ones? Would there be more of a risk of damaging the power supply permanently if eleven are messed with at one time or should it not matter?
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:16 PM   #24
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So, essentially replace all 11 capacitors (if the price is reasonable)? Or should I maybe just worry & replace the 5 bigger ones? Would there be more of a risk of damaging the power supply permanently if eleven are messed with at one time or should it not matter?
If the shop knows what they're doing, replacing caps should pose no danger to the power supply.

Ask them if the bulgey one is part of the input or output side.

If it's part of the output side, it's likely the +12V rail (yellow wire) or the +5V one (red wire), so it and any in parallel with it should be replaced (the shop will know what I mean by in parallel).

A cap on the 3.3V rail (orange wire) or whatever the gray wire is (8V, 9V?, it's the power for the OLED) should probably still be okay, the major current draw is on the 5 and the 12.

If that cap with the bulge on top is part of the input side, everything on the input side (except perhaps a really big fat one about as big around as a quarter and rated at 200v or more--if this version of the power supply has one) should probably be replaced along with it since they've probably been stressed by their failing neighbor.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:17 PM   #25
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They should have the gear to plug it in and see which caps are allowing ripple voltage through and only replace those. If I didn't think it was a switching power supply, I'd say you could do it with a cheap voltmeter on the AC setting, but an oscilloscope is the right tool for the job.
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Old 03-07-2012, 11:32 PM   #26
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They should have the gear to plug it in and see which caps are allowing ripple voltage through and only replace those. If I didn't think it was a switching power supply, I'd say you could do it with a cheap voltmeter on the AC setting, but an oscilloscope is the right tool for the job.
To do that (or to test the power supply at all) they will the rest of the TiVo, since it is a switching supply and must have the load for which it's designed (the motherboard and hard drive) attached in order to operate properly.
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Old 03-13-2012, 01:30 AM   #27
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I can offer up another solution for those not wanting to tackle the capacitor issue themselves. I went through having issues with tuners or cablecards failing and causing reboots. Replaced the cablecards and it would work for a while. This was an original S3 with the OLED display. After going through several sets of cablecards, I started questioning that perhaps it was either the HD or the Power supply just from readings online. I was about to pull the trigger on purchasing a replacement PS from Weakknees for $99. But before I finalized the order, I gave TiVo a call, explained to them that I've owned an original S1 that I bought when they company first started delivering the boxes, and this S3 that was purchased the day after they became available. They offered to swap my S3 for a refurbished unit for the great price of $50 to cover shipping and handling. They put a $100 additional charge on my credit card which was refunded as soon as they got the original box back.

When I had purchased the original S3 I had almost immediately installed a 1TB HD. I figured it had been 5 or 6 years, so I figured, I might as well spring for a new 1TB HD as well, which I probably should have had to replace soon anyway. All in all, I'm a happy camper.
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:30 PM   #28
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Yeah, but you lost all of your programs, right?
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Old 03-14-2012, 10:22 AM   #29
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Trust me, I have looked into ALL kinds of options. TiVo suggested to me that it was probably bad cable cards causing my random reboots/freezes. I was leery, but figured it was worth a shot and couldn't hurt or cost anything to try their suggestion. I unplugged my cable cards and tried to run the S3 on a pure analog cable signal, but that didn't work either. It still randomly rebooted and froze up.

TiVo mentioned their trade in program to me as well, but they said it would cost me $149 for a new Series3 and then $199 to transfer its current lifetime. I am figuring its MUCH more cost effective to try and have the capacitors repaired at this point. Was quoted about $15 from a local shop to replace that one bad capacitor (seen in pics). Might even get some others replaced as well & as suggested in order to avoid possible problems down the road.

Plus, I figured if I did get a replacement S3 from TiVO directly, I'm thinking there is no guarantee I wouldn't have this same issue down the road and be going through all of this again. I tend to think they aren't necessarily fixing or worrying about this issue in their own refurb units, but I could be wrong on that.

Bottom line is I would rather try the $15 capacitor repair route first over the $350 replacement program offered by TiVo.
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Old 03-14-2012, 10:29 AM   #30
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I was worried that "your mileage may vary" on the refurb/replacement stuff. You could try calling back and see if another rep would give you a better offer, but to me a local repair is the best option at any price.
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