TiVo Community
TiVo Community
TiVo Community
Go Back   TiVo Community > Main TiVo Forums > TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs
TiVo Community
Reply
Forum Jump
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-10-2007, 09:38 AM   #211
Brainiac 5
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Columbia, MD, USA
Posts: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBlount
I expect most companies will "give" you a box for "free" (Comcast always does when you subscribe to a digital service. However, they probably will raise the basic cost to cover it.
I think you're both right - they'll probably "give" you one box for "free" and then charge you separately for every box after that. (Which, as you say, is what Comcast already does for digital service.)
Brainiac 5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 09:55 AM   #212
MichaelK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NJ
Posts: 7,299
yup- that first box will be "free" just like locals, espn, disney, etc.

They put the cost in there someplace....

And actualy with boxes they are regulated and are supposed to attemtp to maintain something akin to break even on hardware rentals. So they can't legally subsidize them (in places were they still have regulated pricing becasue there is no effective competition...)
MichaelK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 01:26 PM   #213
MighTiVo
TiVotarian
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 2,380
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiVoPony
Hey guys,

I know you've been anxiously awaiting TiVoToGo and Multi-Room Viewing on your Series3 and TiVoHD boxes.

I wanted to let you know that development has been progressing smoothly, and all is well. You can expect TTG & MRV to be available for Series3 and TiVoHD this November.
With the recent automated phone calls announcing new features for DTV TiVo boxes, any any chance MRV will make it to those boxes?
MighTiVo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 02:51 PM   #214
Adam1115
20,000!!!
 
Adam1115's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Denver ish
Posts: 22,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by MighTiVo
With the recent automated phone calls announcing new features for DTV TiVo boxes, any any chance MRV will make it to those boxes?
No.
__________________
-----------------------------
Check out my (mostly) IT blog!

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Adam1115 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 03:00 PM   #215
Fofer
༺♥༻
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 65,996
TC CLUB MEMBER
Quote:
Originally Posted by MighTiVo
With the recent automated phone calls announcing new features for DTV TiVo boxes, any any chance MRV will make it to those boxes?
With hacking, yes. That's what I did until I dumped DTV and moved to cable and a S3.
Fofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 03:01 PM   #216
TexasGrillChef
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,757
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyts
Which movies are those? There's a mechanism in AACS (the copy protection system used on Blu-ray and HD DVD discs) called the "Image Constraint Token"; if the ICT is asserted, rendering of the content is constrained to no more than one quarter 1920x1080 (i.e., 960x540) when displayed over analog component video. All of the movie studios have sworn off use of the ICT for the present. In any case, the AACS licensing requires that any release which uses it be clearly labelled, so that people who aren't using HDMI can avoid buying them. (There's a rumor that multiple studios agreed amongst themselves to hold off on using it until 2010 or 2012).

I was unaware that anyone had used the ICT. Which films are you talking about?
I had heard in rumor that some were using it. I did know that the systems were capable of limiting resolution on the component output. Therefore...After I read your reply here I did a little more research into this issue to see if any movies were in fact making use of this technology.

What I found out is that you are indeed CORRECT. That CURRENTLY no one in the USA market is making use of ICT.

However, the "Content Providers" are keeping a close eye on the market and "pirating" going on. Should they see in the future, abuse of the component output in the form of illegal copies poping up. They could and probably would start using ICT. Most likely this would occur first in the Asian & European markets first giving us a "heads up".

My main point that I was trying to make though, while ICT isn't currently being used. It is something everyone should be aware of & should NOT turn a blind eye too.

My personal effort is to keep as many people as informed as possible in anything that MAY limit our possible "Fair use" that I beleive we all as consumers are entitled too. I don't beleive in DRM, Encrypting, or limiting our use of legal content when there are those of us who purchase/rent legal copies of said content.

I do appreciate you clarifying the "details" of this further. I SHOULD have added in my original statement that I have not see any movies that have made use of ICT.

Thank you for pointing that out

TGC
TexasGrillChef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2007, 03:25 PM   #217
mikeyts
Wireless Wiseguy
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 2,121
I monitor highdefdigest.com and would have expected any use of the ICT to be huge news there. I believe that they compare the HDMI and component outputs when reviewing discs just to be sure that the publishers don't try to sneak an ICT-enabled disc in somehow.

The issue doesn't affect me personally, since both my HD DVD player (a Toshiba HD-A20) and Blu-ray player (a Playstation 3) are connected to my system via HDMI for both sound and video, but there are quite a few folks out there who would go ballistic. It'll be a while (years) before the ICT can safely be used without precipitating a PR nightmare.
__________________
Mike Scott

"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -- hookbill
mikeyts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 05:37 AM   #218
Brighton Line
Registered User
 
Brighton Line's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBlount
I expect most companies will "give" you a box for "free" (Comcast always does when you subscribe to a digital service. However, they probably will raise the basic cost to cover it.
Cablevision in NYC is all digital execpt for about 23 stations, basic broadcast and some public access. When they switched we had to go to the local"Store" to swap the non-digital boxes for digital boxes. Cablevision in NYC always has required a box for permium channles.

I'm still paying over $6 for the box and I have to pay $5 to have the premium channels on a 2nd box in the home.
When I got my cable cards which are only $1.25 a month I lost one $6 charge (plus $0.23 for remote) but they still charge me the $5 for premium channles on a second outlet, they would not waive it even though I don't have a "2nd box".
Brighton Line is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 07:52 AM   #219
kas25
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NJ
Posts: 411
Home Videos

I currently have a S3 as well as an Apple TV. I use the Apple TVs to play home movies, as well as pics/music. Will I be able to transfer these files (MPEG 4 format) to the TIVO. I think I've heard this question asked but not answered. Thank you.
kas25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:52 AM   #220
cgould
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by kas25
I currently have a S3 as well as an Apple TV. I use the Apple TVs to play home movies, as well as pics/music. Will I be able to transfer these files (MPEG 4 format) to the TIVO. I think I've heard this question asked but not answered. Thank you.
Pony clarified to No- at least not initially/yet, for HD files at least; Tivo format (source) only.
Other sources (with accidental TTCB access) however earlier reported some success w/ various HD/SD MPG2 formats after some tweaks- but not MPG4 (SD also.)
So we might both be stuck at first. (The tivo chipset supports MPG4 etc, but maybe not the drivers, or at least tivo desktop for transfers.)

I'm hoping eventually it will support more formats. We'll see if Tivo Desktop+ or VideoRedo etc might help w/ making correct transcodes/formats etc. Can't wait til November!
cgould is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:53 AM   #221
bdraw
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Tampa, FL
Posts: 456
Why would the content providers even care about ICT, as long as AACS is ineffective at protecting data? I'm not sure why anyone would record via component when they could just put a disc in their computer and copy it, which would be faster and without the chance of degrading quality.
__________________
How good can it be, if it isn't HD?
Ben Drawbaugh
Engadget HD
bdraw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 09:01 AM   #222
cgould
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdraw
Why would the content providers even care about ICT, as long as AACS is ineffective at protecting data? I'm not sure why anyone would record via component when they could just put a disc in their computer and copy it, which would be faster and without the chance of degrading quality.
Exactly- what kind of realtime component HD video capture devices exist out there anyway? Certainly nothing that's as cheap as simply spending $20-40 for the real disk...

This component downgrade crap really pisses me off, since I don't have an HDMI HDTV, so any "upconverting" DVD player is worthless for me. And it's much easier as you said to simply rip the stupid disk directly.

At least the GOOD thing about component, is I don't have any of the HDCP nightmares from HDMI- I'll live with problem-free HD happily if only downside is no DVD upconverts!

All this means yet again that DRM/copy protection, only hurts the legitimate users, (and CE mfrs trying to make it work), and not the pirates- and the stupid content providers still don't get it. Paranoid , stupid idiots that ruin things for the rest of us.
cgould is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 12:06 PM   #223
mikeyts
Wireless Wiseguy
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 2,121
Believe me--the content providers realize that real pirates will get around the copy protection systems (particularly systems for protecting static media, like AACS). There's nothing they can do that won't eventually be broken, by people with a strong profit motive, who can spend significant money on the problem since they expect to realize a return. I've seen whitepapers and slide presentations on copy protection in which they freely admit it. This stuff is aimed at making Joe Average follow the rules. They don't want millions of Joe Averages making unauthorized copies of their IP and casually passing them around to their friends. "Keeping honest people honest."
__________________
Mike Scott

"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -- hookbill
mikeyts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 01:12 PM   #224
Crazydiamond
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfh3
It will be interesting to see how many of the S3/THD "I'm not buying another box until Tivo enables MRV" crowd actually goes out and gets another box ...
Well actually for some of us this could actually result in more than just upgrading to the new HD Tivos - part of my decision to upgrade my old tube TV's to HD TV's was dependent on Tivo getting MRV (which we use all the time on S2's) in the new HD units.

Yes, this could be a very busy year for "HD Santa".




P.S.

Of course after reading a few posts here I have to know if my Comcast Chicago SCI-FI channel, BBCA and other digital channels are allowed to use the MRV feature on the new Tivo HD units
Crazydiamond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 01:13 PM   #225
TexasGrillChef
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,757
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdraw
Why would the content providers even care about ICT, as long as AACS is ineffective at protecting data? I'm not sure why anyone would record via component when they could just put a disc in their computer and copy it, which would be faster and without the chance of degrading quality.

Who says "Content Providers" do anything logical or easy? LOL

Why do they even mess and spend money on DRM when everyone knows it will get broken eventually.

TGC
TexasGrillChef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 01:21 PM   #226
TexasGrillChef
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,757
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyts
Believe me--the content providers realize that real pirates will get around the copy protection systems (particularly systems for protecting static media, like AACS). There's nothing they can do that won't eventually be broken, by people with a strong profit motive, who can spend significant money on the problem since they expect to realize a return. I've seen whitepapers and slide presentations on copy protection in which they freely admit it. This stuff is aimed at making Joe Average follow the rules. They don't want millions of Joe Averages making unauthorized copies of their IP and casually passing them around to their friends. "Keeping honest people honest."

Exactly.... However.....

Once the "Breaks" are figured out. Sofware comes out for the general public to allow us "Joe Averages" to make copies of our DVD's

I can give you a list of at least 5 different programs available for free or even less then $50 that can easily copy & convert regular DVD's.

Through a pain in the butt process I (Joe Average) can allready rip Blu-Ray and HD-DVD movies. I give it another year & someone will release a simple to use program that will be available for "Joe Average" to rip Blu-ray & HD-DVD

The problem is, that most of Joe Averages just don't want to be controlled on how, where, when and the way we choose to watch their content.

TGC
TexasGrillChef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 01:31 PM   #227
MichaelK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NJ
Posts: 7,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasGrillChef
Who says "Content Providers" do anything logical or easy? LOL

Why do they even mess and spend money on DRM when everyone knows it will get broken eventually.

TGC

this all reminds me of all the bizarro copy protection they put on computer software in the beginning- if I recall they used to use oddly formatted disks and things like that.

Now all the software people seem to have given up and just seem to use "secret codes' that get validated. With all the HD disc players having ethernet- I could see the secret code thing being the end game at some point. You buy a disc and it comes with a pin- the first time you put it in your player it calls the mother ship and they prompt you for the pin. Future playback the disc asks the mothership and it recognizes the mac address (or crypto chip or some unique indentifier in the player) already called in with the PIN and allows playback without any user intervention. If we get LUCKY- we can also play the disk on the player in the bedroom by re-entering the pin- but if you try the pin too many times it tells you to bite me...

just my WAG of how ugly this gets in the end...
MichaelK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 01:35 PM   #228
mercurial
Retro-Av
 
mercurial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Caraleigh, NC
Posts: 17,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelK
this all reminds me of all the bizarro copy protection they put on computer software in the beginning- if I recall they used to use oddly formatted disks and things like that.

Now all the software people seem to have given up and just seem to use "secret codes' that get validated. With all the HD disc players having ethernet- I could see the secret code thing being the end game at some point. You buy a disc and it comes with a pin- the first time you put it in your player it calls the mother ship and they prompt you for the pin. Future playback the disc asks the mothership and it recognizes the mac address (or crypto chip or some unique indentifier in the player) already called in with the PIN and allows playback without any user intervention. If we get LUCKY- we can also play the disk on the player in the bedroom by re-entering the pin- but if you try the pin too many times it tells you to bite me...

just my WAG of how ugly this gets in the end...

You mean, like Circuit City's DIVX?
__________________
"WAFFLES!!!" - Hiro Nakamura
mercurial is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 02:00 PM   #229
MichaelK
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: NJ
Posts: 7,299
Quote:
Originally Posted by mercurial
You mean, like Circuit City's DIVX?

good example. Yepp- I'm afraid that's what happens. I just read a story the other day how google (I think?) had been "beta" testing video and decided to go out of business and so everyone that "purchased" video from them is now SOL and wont be able to use the content they bought. (although I think Google did give them all credits?)

unbox is just another example of one not physically possessing the content one purchased.
MichaelK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 02:06 PM   #230
nathanziarek
Registered User
 
nathanziarek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyts
Believe me--the content providers realize that real pirates will get around the copy protection systems (particularly systems for protecting static media, like AACS). There's nothing they can do that won't eventually be broken, by people with a strong profit motive, who can spend significant money on the problem since they expect to realize a return. I've seen whitepapers and slide presentations on copy protection in which they freely admit it. This stuff is aimed at making Joe Average follow the rules. They don't want millions of Joe Averages making unauthorized copies of their IP and casually passing them around to their friends. "Keeping honest people honest."
I don't think that is the reason for a second. DRM accomplishes nothing but provide a temporary block to pirates. Eventually they'll figure it out. Everyone knows that.

The real reason DRM exists is to halt inter-compatibility. Media companies have every reason to make sure that a video bought for the Zune plays only on a Zune. It lessens the potential audience of thieves and (most importantly) forces me to repurchase the media if I were to buy an incompatible player in the future. The media companies remember the record profits they made from the conversion of VHS to DVD and see DRM as a way to keep that ball rolling.

My 2 cents anyway...
__________________
The hardest part of learning something new is figuring out what there is to know.
nathanziarek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 06:42 PM   #231
dougdingle
HD Tech
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Coast
Posts: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderclap
Glad to hear I'll finally be able to transfer video from my PC to Tivo again! And now, with Apple's announcement of possible movie rentals through iTunes, it would be doubly sweet if we could get integrated iTunes rental on Tivo. (hint hint)
What an unbelievable disaster that would be.

iTunes appears to be an insidious virus propagated by Apple in an attempt to be the world's gatekeeper for DRM.

What Jobs appears to want in the long run is a few cents every single time you watch or listen to anything you haven't personally created. Once he has reached some predetermined number of installations, he's going to partner with every content provider in the known universe in a revenue sharing agreement which is likely going to cost us money every time we play back anything.

A big step was requiring the installation of iTunes to activate the iPhone. There is no reason on earth that was necessary, but if you didn't install iTunes, you couldn't activate your new $600 toy. Not at the Apple store. Not at AT&T. You HAD to install iTunes to turn the phone on. It was the reason I didn't buy an iPhone (which is a nice piece of version 1.0 technology, BTW).

The last thing I want is that program anywhere near my TiVo.
dougdingle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 06:50 PM   #232
nathanziarek
Registered User
 
nathanziarek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 105
Hmm...I like my iPods, iPhone and Macs, but I am far from one of those "Apple just wants whats best for the consumer" mac zealots. Still, I don't think Jobs cares much about the media. He's a known music lover, but claims not to watch TV or movies. He wants to sell iPods and iPhones with huge margins. He wants to control the experience of his gadgets -- that's why iTunes was required. I've never pegged Apple for a nickle-and-dime sort of company (exact opposite in fact).
__________________
The hardest part of learning something new is figuring out what there is to know.
nathanziarek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 07:08 PM   #233
dougdingle
HD Tech
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: West Coast
Posts: 198
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanziarek
I've never pegged Apple for a nickle-and-dime sort of company (exact opposite in fact).
Nickels and dimes add up very quickly when the number of installations is, say, fifty million PCs and Macs (not to mention all those iPods, iPhones, and whatever else will have iTunes), and each one pays just a few pennies for every playback.

The ongoing ever growing revenue stream from that will make the enormous income from, say, Microsoft Office or iPod sales look like chump change. It's the Gillette model (give away the razor, charge for every blade) extrapolated to an enormous base.
dougdingle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:04 PM   #234
Tuckrat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 33
Big Grin

Where do I sign up for the priority update???
Tuckrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:31 PM   #235
Redux
No intent to annoy
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 1,564
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougdingle
It's the Gillette model (give away the razor, charge for every blade) extrapolated to an enormous base.
If you read a bit, you'd find that iTunes is frequently referred to as the razor blade model reversed.

Also you'd discover that Jobs has been forcefully lobbying the Music Industry to allow universal (so to speak) DRM-free distribution, which is itself a major part of the friction between Apple and the Industry.

Having had DRM forced upon it as a condition of doing business with that Industry, Apple is very good at implementing it, and this certainly does aggravate many users.
__________________
"I know I've known how to do that at some point, but I don't remember how at the moment." - a truth learned on TCF
Redux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:37 PM   #236
Fofer
༺♥༻
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 65,996
TC CLUB MEMBER
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanziarek
He's a known music lover, but claims not to watch TV or movies.
I don't buy that. Dude was the CEO of Pixar until its acquisition by Disney. He is currently the largest Disney shareholder and a member of Disney's Board of Directors.

I think he watches a movie or two, now and then.
Fofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:38 PM   #237
Fofer
༺♥༻
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Neither here nor there
Posts: 65,996
TC CLUB MEMBER
Quote:
Originally Posted by dougdingle
iTunes appears to be an insidious virus propagated by Apple in an attempt to be the world's gatekeeper for DRM.
LOL.

Might be time to edumacate yourself:

http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughtsonmusic/

http://news.com.com/EMI,+Apple+partn...3-6172398.html
Fofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 08:51 PM   #238
mikeyts
Wireless Wiseguy
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: San Diego, CA, USA
Posts: 2,121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redux
Having had DRM forced upon it as a condition of doing business with that Industry, Apple is very good at implementing it, and this certainly does aggravate many users.
My problem with iTunes is that Apple chose to invent their own DRM system--ironically called "FairPlay"--which they've refused to license to any other music store. When the iTunes store hit the scene there had been a plethora of stores online using WMDRM for years. You can only buy licensed music from the iTunes store to play on iPods and you can't play the tracks on anything else (except the iTunes player running on a Mac or PC).

Of course, Microsoft decided to follow Apple's lead for the Zune store and create a special version of WMDRM just for the Zune.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fofer
EDIT: Just read that. Ugh .
__________________
Mike Scott

"
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
" -- hookbill
mikeyts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 09:26 PM   #239
Dennis Wilkinson
Registered User
 
Dennis Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: East Freetown, MA
Posts: 2,064
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyts
My problem with iTunes is that Apple chose to invent their own DRM system--ironically called "FairPlay"--which they've refused to license to any other music store. When the iTunes store hit the scene there had been a plethora of stores online using WMDRM for years. You can only buy licensed music from the iTunes store to play on iPods and you can't play the tracks on anything else (except the iTunes player running on a Mac or PC).
They did this/do this (developed their own/refuse to license it) because they were the ones contractually 'liable' to the record companies should their DRM be broken, so they also wanted to be the sole party responsible for the DRM scheme (my recollection is that FairPlay was something Apple purchased and developed further in-house, not really a "roll-from-scratch" thing, but that's not really relevant, as FairPlay today is clearly Apple-only.)

It makes sense from a managing-the-business standpoint. And if you buy from a DRM-free music store, all of Apple's devices will happily play the content. With over 30GB loaded, my iPod has much, much less than 1% of its content purchased from the iTunes Store (and all of the content is legitimately purchased, predominantly ripped from CD -- if I'm going to pay full price, I want all the bits, not something compressed.)
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Dennis Wilkinson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2007, 10:56 PM   #240
saberman
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by TiVoPony
These features will provide support for video transfers between Series3 & Series2 systems and between a Series3/Series2 system and a PC. High Definition content will not be supported for transfer or playback on a Series2 system (Series2's just can't play HD), and copy-protected High Def or Standard Def content cannot be transferred (same as our current Series2 products). The aptly yet unofficially named TiVoToComeBack also will be supported, including HD content (originally recorded on a TiVo DVR).
Any chance they'll final put in folder support for video files?
saberman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Forum Jump




Thread Tools


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Advertisements

TiVo Community
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBulletin Skins by: Relivo Media

(C) 2013 Magenium Solutions - All Rights Reserved. No information may be posted elsewhere without written permission.
TiVoŽ is a registered trademark of TiVo Inc. This site is not owned or operated by TiVo Inc.
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:31 PM.
OUR NETWORK: MyOpenRouter | TechLore | SansaCommunity | RoboCommunity | MediaSmart Home | Explore3DTV | Dijit Community | DVR Playground |