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Old 11-10-2014, 02:39 PM   #1
Heie
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Tivo Series 3 HD OLED 250GB Broken

TiVo Community,

I need to fix my TiVo series 3 HD. This is model number: TCD648250B

I have done as much testing as I possibly could and will include the details below.

Prior to the issue, I was watching TV and the show paused, the screen turned odd colors (pink and other random colors) then the Tivo had to be unplugged because it was completely unresponsive.

I turned the Tivo on and all four lights on the box lit up.

The tivo was stuck in a continous resetting loop.

I have taken the TiVo apart and the HardDrive is already out.
The power supply passes visual inspection.

I believe it is the harddrive based on everything I read, and the fact that the screen displayed the odd colors and the pause that it did.


I am looking for the best / cheapest route to fixing the TiVo.
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Old 11-10-2014, 08:17 PM   #2
windracer
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If it is indeed the hard drive (and not the power supply) the repair is as easy as purchasing a new hard drive and restoring an image onto it with WinMFS. I can PM you a link to my OLED S3 image (11.0h software).
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:02 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heie View Post
TiVo Community,

I need to fix my TiVo series 3 HD. This is model number: TCD648250B

I have done as much testing as I possibly could and will include the details below.

Prior to the issue, I was watching TV and the show paused, the screen turned odd colors (pink and other random colors) then the Tivo had to be unplugged because it was completely unresponsive.

I turned the Tivo on and all four lights on the box lit up.

The tivo was stuck in a continous resetting loop.

I have taken the TiVo apart and the HardDrive is already out.
The power supply passes visual inspection.

I believe it is the harddrive based on everything I read, and the fact that the screen displayed the odd colors and the pause that it did.


I am looking for the best / cheapest route to fixing the TiVo.
Do you have a PC that you can hook the drive up to?

Is it the original 250GB drive?

There's still a chance that the power supply has a problem, or that both the drive and the power supply have problems.

Do you know anybody who has a voltmeter?

There's also a slim chance that the TiVo motherboard itself is going bad.

The thing to do here is find out what the problem is before spending any money.

We can help you do that.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:19 AM   #4
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Did the "visual inspection" of the power supply include closely examining each electrolytic capacitor (the metal "cans") for even very slight bulging of the tops?
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:05 AM   #5
jrtroo
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A visual inspection is only good to show obvious problems. Some still work after a cap vents, but there are many times where folks find it has failed without visual evidence.
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrtroo View Post
A visual inspection is only good to show obvious problems. Some still work after a cap vents, but there are many times where folks find it has failed without visual evidence.
Correct. If an electrolytic capacitor dries out inside, due to a faulty seal, or damage when installed, or any other number of reasons, there will be no (or insufficient) electrolyte inside, to create the gasses, which would create the visual signs of failing/failure. This is just one of many weaknesses found in electrolytics. They can be just as bad/failing/failed without visual indications, as they can be with them.
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Old 11-11-2014, 04:41 PM   #7
Heie
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Alright - What is the best way to be exactly sure whether it is the power supply or not?

I am out of town but can do a more comprehensive test on the power supply when I get back home. I will be home Thursday.

That being said - I was lucky enough to win a Weaknees 1 TB Tivo Series 3 OLED HD from Ebay for $72. It is claimed working so I am protected under Ebays Buyer Protection policy incase it does not. When it arrives I will first boot it up and verify it is working, then I can test it in my TiVo.

If that does not work, ironically I also have a working power supply in same said TiVo. I figured $72 was not bad for both of these replacement parts. as I can likely sell whichever is not needed, or save in-case I eventually do need it.

Please do let me know how I should best proceed.

Thanks,
Heie
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Old 11-11-2014, 04:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heie View Post
I am looking for the best / cheapest route to fixing the TiVo.
Where are you located?
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heie View Post
Alright - What is the best way to be exactly sure whether it is the power supply or not?

I am out of town but can do a more comprehensive test on the power supply when I get back home. I will be home Thursday.

That being said - I was lucky enough to win a Weaknees 1 TB Tivo Series 3 OLED HD from Ebay for $72. It is claimed working so I am protected under Ebays Buyer Protection policy incase it does not. When it arrives I will first boot it up and verify it is working, then I can test it in my TiVo.

If that does not work, ironically I also have a working power supply in same said TiVo. I figured $72 was not bad for both of these replacement parts. as I can likely sell whichever is not needed, or save in-case I eventually do need it.

Please do let me know how I should best proceed.

Thanks,
Heie

Worst case scenario, if your current 648 is lifetimed, and the motherboard is bad, someone who knows how to solder and de-solder Surface Mount Devices can move the crypto chip to the new motherboard, which will move the TiVo Service Number, and the lifetime sub is tied to that number.


How to test the power supply in your current TiVo.

THE FIRST RULE IS KNOW WHERE BOTH ENDS OF THE TIVO'S POWER CORD ARE AT ALL TIMES.!!!

The best way is to connect and disconnect the power with the wall socket plug end of the power cord, and not the end that plugs into the back of the TiVo.

If the wall socket is hard to get to, use an extension cord, or better yet an outlet strip, especially one with a switch if you have it.

The idea is to be able to quickly disconnect power if necessary without having to touch the TiVo chassis itself.

Remember, the TiVo power supply, once you remove the what you have to remove to see the innards, is no longer shielded from accidental contact with the 120 V AC part of it.

Position the opened TiVo with the front facing you so that the power supply is to your right and the hard drive location to your left.

But first, since it's a SATA drive you can't safely test the power with a voltmeter at the hard drive power plug like you could with the older PATA drives in S1s and S2s.

So, the cable bundle from the power supply that plugs into the motherboard will have to do.

You need a voltmeter, set on DC Volts. The available range settings will depend on what brand and model it is, but all the ranges start at 0 Volts and go up.

If it has a 0-15 V range, use that one. If the lowest upper limit is 25V, use that one. You want to know in advance what voltage level you should be getting and select a range which has an upper end higher than that anticipated voltage.

The voltmeter will probably have a black test lead, which will plug into a jack labeled common or negative, and a red lead plugged into one labeled positive.

It may also have wording associated with the ohmmeter function of the meter, which is for measuring resistance, and you want to not have the meter function switch set to that (or to current/amperage, either AC or DC, or to AC Volts)

If there's an alligator clamp on the end of the black lead, use that to connect the black lead to the metal chassis on the left side (the side the power supply is not on.

If there's just a "needle" probe at the end of the black lead you can wedge it into one of the cutouts on the chassis.

There's a bunch of wires that come off of the power supply board and end in a plug that plugs into a socket on the motherboard.

What you'll do is take the red lead from the meter and stick the metal probe tip down into one of the holes in the plug where a wire goes into it until you contact the metal terminal on the end of the wire.

You want to check a yellow wire for +12 V DC and a red wire for +5 V.

Those are the two most likely to be "off" if there's something wrong, and those are the two outputs also used by the hard drive.

All the wires of the same color connect to the same place on the power supply board and are therefore electrically the same.

The black wires from the power supply are the ground connections which are the other, common, point between which you measure voltages.

The orange wire(s) are supposed to measure 3.3V and there's a white or gray wire on the 648 supply which is for the OLED display and I think it's supposed to be 7.5 V.

Check the 5 and the 12 both with the hard drive connected and with it disconnected. There shouldn't be very much difference in the readings.

You probably won't get exactly 12 V or exactly 5 V, but each should be well within half a Volt.

It's best to take the measurements with the red test lead held in one hand, preferably the right, and the other hand in your pocket where it won't accidentally touch any part of the TiVo or anything else grounded.

Also, don't be wearing anything that could sag or fall into the TiVo when you lean over it making the measurements, like necklaces, neckties, et cetera.

If you're wearing long sleeves, roll them up. Take off rings, watches, braclets, and such.

Think out and visualize your actions first and try to anticipate what might go wrong so as to take steps to avoid it.

Do a "dry run" without the TiVo power cord plugged in until you're comfortable that you're going to be able to do things correctly and not accidentally pull the black lead loose or something like that.
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:27 PM   #10
unitron
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If you wind up swapping power supplies between the TiVos, all of the Series 3 models have, in addition to the #10 Torx driver screws holding the power supply circuit board down to the chassis, a small, black, screw that goes in from the outside on the back into the plastic that's the top of the AC input jack.

For that you'll need a #8 or #9 Torx bit.

And you'll need to remember it's there so you don't try to lift the power supply circuit board with it still in and wind up breaking something.
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Old 11-13-2014, 10:41 AM   #11
Teeps
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Wow Unitron,
This is good. So good I'm bookmarking it for future use.
It reminds me of how we had to write service procedure at work... for "Professional Technicians" (I use that term loosly.)



Quote:
Originally Posted by unitron View Post
Worst case scenario, if your current 648 is lifetimed, and the motherboard is bad, someone who knows how to solder and de-solder Surface Mount Devices can move the crypto chip to the new motherboard, which will move the TiVo Service Number, and the lifetime sub is tied to that number.


How to test the power supply in your current TiVo.

THE FIRST RULE IS KNOW WHERE BOTH ENDS OF THE TIVO'S POWER CORD ARE AT ALL TIMES.!!!

The best way is to connect and disconnect the power with the wall socket plug end of the power cord, and not the end that plugs into the back of the TiVo.

If the wall socket is hard to get to, use an extension cord, or better yet an outlet strip, especially one with a switch if you have it.

The idea is to be able to quickly disconnect power if necessary without having to touch the TiVo chassis itself.

Remember, the TiVo power supply, once you remove the what you have to remove to see the innards, is no longer shielded from accidental contact with the 120 V AC part of it.

Position the opened TiVo with the front facing you so that the power supply is to your right and the hard drive location to your left.

But first, since it's a SATA drive you can't safely test the power with a voltmeter at the hard drive power plug like you could with the older PATA drives in S1s and S2s.

So, the cable bundle from the power supply that plugs into the motherboard will have to do.

You need a voltmeter, set on DC Volts. The available range settings will depend on what brand and model it is, but all the ranges start at 0 Volts and go up.

If it has a 0-15 V range, use that one. If the lowest upper limit is 25V, use that one. You want to know in advance what voltage level you should be getting and select a range which has an upper end higher than that anticipated voltage.

The voltmeter will probably have a black test lead, which will plug into a jack labeled common or negative, and a red lead plugged into one labeled positive.

It may also have wording associated with the ohmmeter function of the meter, which is for measuring resistance, and you want to not have the meter function switch set to that (or to current/amperage, either AC or DC, or to AC Volts)

If there's an alligator clamp on the end of the black lead, use that to connect the black lead to the metal chassis on the left side (the side the power supply is not on.

If there's just a "needle" probe at the end of the black lead you can wedge it into one of the cutouts on the chassis.

There's a bunch of wires that come off of the power supply board and end in a plug that plugs into a socket on the motherboard.

What you'll do is take the red lead from the meter and stick the metal probe tip down into one of the holes in the plug where a wire goes into it until you contact the metal terminal on the end of the wire.

You want to check a yellow wire for +12 V DC and a red wire for +5 V.

Those are the two most likely to be "off" if there's something wrong, and those are the two outputs also used by the hard drive.

All the wires of the same color connect to the same place on the power supply board and are therefore electrically the same.

The black wires from the power supply are the ground connections which are the other, common, point between which you measure voltages.

The orange wire(s) are supposed to measure 3.3V and there's a white or gray wire on the 648 supply which is for the OLED display and I think it's supposed to be 7.5 V.

Check the 5 and the 12 both with the hard drive connected and with it disconnected. There shouldn't be very much difference in the readings.

You probably won't get exactly 12 V or exactly 5 V, but each should be well within half a Volt.

It's best to take the measurements with the red test lead held in one hand, preferably the right, and the other hand in your pocket where it won't accidentally touch any part of the TiVo or anything else grounded.

Also, don't be wearing anything that could sag or fall into the TiVo when you lean over it making the measurements, like necklaces, neckties, et cetera.

If you're wearing long sleeves, roll them up. Take off rings, watches, braclets, and such.

Think out and visualize your actions first and try to anticipate what might go wrong so as to take steps to avoid it.

Do a "dry run" without the TiVo power cord plugged in until you're comfortable that you're going to be able to do things correctly and not accidentally pull the black lead loose or something like that.

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Old 11-17-2014, 03:15 PM   #12
rainbow
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Power Supply Question

I have a 648 series and am pretty certain the power supply has gone. are the 648 series and 649 series power supplies the same/switchable?

edit: was just reading more info on capacitors, and saw a posting that 648, and 652, etc have different power supplies. so I think I would be safe in thinking that 648 and 649 are different as well.

I will put my unworking 648 aside for the time being, and will look into capacitor replacement on that unit.

Last edited by rainbow : 11-17-2014 at 04:21 PM.
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Old 11-18-2014, 09:14 AM   #13
unitron
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rainbow View Post
I have a 648 series and am pretty certain the power supply has gone. are the 648 series and 649 series power supplies the same/switchable?

edit: was just reading more info on capacitors, and saw a posting that 648, and 652, etc have different power supplies. so I think I would be safe in thinking that 648 and 649 are different as well.

I will put my unworking 648 aside for the time being, and will look into capacitor replacement on that unit.
As far as I know the 649 (Series 2 Dual Tuner) power supply is not electrically compatible with any other model, although it physically probably fits where a 540 or 240 supply does.

You can use a supply from the later model Series 3s, the 652 and the 658 (which can use each other's supplies) to test a 648 (just don't expect a normal front panel as they lack the extra 7.5V DC output the 648 has just for that, but DO NOT put a 648 supply into a 652 or 658, 'cause we don't know what that extra output will make contact with on a motherboard that's not designed to use it.


When removing a Series 3 power supply, watch out for the screw on the back outside.
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Old Yesterday, 02:53 AM   #14
shwru980r
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I tried using two different 652 power supplies in my 648 when I was having power supply issues and could never get past the first tivo screen. Another tivo community member, timhbtr53, was able to replace the capacitors on my 648 power supply and that fixed the problem.
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