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Old 12-02-2012, 09:58 PM   #1
jerry872005
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Cannot Queue Up Shows to Transfer

Hello:

i just bought a Tivo Premiere XL4 and am trying to transfer shows from my older Tivo HD XL to my premiere. I can only transfer one show at a time. The Tivo Premiere allows me to go in to my other tivo and look at the other shows and click on one, and after a slight delay, the screen will load but when I try and click on transfer show, the screen freezes up. If I click the back arrow or the tivo button, it allows me to go back to the other screen. No matter how many times I try, I cannot queue up any shows. I have a lot of shows I wanted to transfer and was wondering if there was an answer.

i have read about this problem on other threads that were posted over 6 months ago. Has anyone figured out a fix for this or should I call Tivo?

Thank you very much to anyone who can help!!

Jerry
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Old 12-03-2012, 11:59 AM   #2
lpwcomp
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How are your Tivos connected to the network? Wired, wireless, combination? Have you assigned fixed IP addresses to both of them?
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:23 PM   #3
jerry872005
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Thanks for your repy! Both tivos are connected wirelessly. There were automatically assigned IP addresses when I did Guided Setup (I think). I never did anything or changed anything with the IP addresses. They both simply connected when I went through Guided Setup.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:35 PM   #4
lpwcomp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry872005 View Post
Thanks for your repy! Both tivos are connected wirelessly. There were automatically assigned IP addresses when I did Guided Setup (I think). I never did anything or changed anything with the IP addresses. They both simply connected when I went through Guided Setup.
If I were you, I would try assigning fixed IP addresses to both TiVos. Couldn't hurt and might help. Also, log into your account at TiVo.com and ensure that "Video sharing" is enabled on both TiVos.
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Old 12-03-2012, 01:47 PM   #5
jerry872005
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I just checked and video enabling is clicked. I am unsure of how to assign IP Addresses. Could you tell me how to go about doing that?
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Old 12-03-2012, 03:22 PM   #6
lpwcomp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerry872005 View Post
I just checked and video enabling is clicked. I am unsure of how to assign IP Addresses. Could you tell me how to go about doing that?
I am not a network expert but you need to find out several things.

1. The IP address of your gateway(router) Mine is 192.168.1.254 but others are different and I don't know if I am supposed to be using the external default gateway address instead. All I really know is that works.

2. The Subnet mask. I use 255.255.255.0 although my router reports 255.255.252.0. Again, what I have works.

3. DNS (name server address(es). That will depend on your ISP. You should be able to find out from your router or your ISP or maybe some other denizen of the TCF could help you.

Then you need to go to the Tivos and navigate to settings ->(Network & Phone or Phone & Network, depending on the TiVo)->Change network settings->Let me specify a static IP address. You will then be prompted to enter an IP address for the TiVo, and then for the previously acquired data. I use 192.169.1.102, 192.168.1.103, 192.168.1.104. and 192.168.1.106 respectively for my 4 TiVos. 192.168.1.101 is for my computer.
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Old 12-03-2012, 04:15 PM   #7
lrhorer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
1. The IP address of your gateway(router) Mine is 192.168.1.254
The most common practice is to set the default gateway (if there is one, which may not always be the case) to the first available address on the subnet. In the case of a 255.255.255.0 netmask, that would be xxx.yyy.zzz.1. If there is only 1 router on the subnet, then it will usually be the default gateway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
but others are different and I don't know if I am supposed to be using the external default gateway address instead. All I really know is that works.
What do you mean by "external"? The default gateway, if there is one, is the IP address on the local LAN of a router that should know what to do with a packet whose destination IP is not on the local subnet. As examples, for a LAN with a network address of 192.168.1 and a netmask of 255.255.255.0, addresses 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.255 are all on the local subnet, but 192.168.0.1, 192.168.2.1, and 74.125.227.34 (google.com) are not. Note a single physical LAN segment can have multiple subnets assigned to it. Those subnets can be managed by one or more than one router, although only one router can typically manage any given subnet.

If by "external" you mean the WAN address of the local router, then no, the hosts on your LAN would not typically know how to get there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
2. The Subnet mask. I use 255.255.255.0 although my router reports 255.255.252.0.
That's a really bad idea, unless you deliberately want hosts in the range from (in your case) 192.168.1.1 through 192.168.1.252 not to be able to reach the internet. The subnet mask defines all the hosts that are on a given subnet to the host on which the netmask is defined. Any device on the same subnet as a particular host can speak directly to the host in question without sending its packets to a router. In general, if the device in question is on a subnet that is not defined on the host in question, then the host will have to send its packets to a router who knows how to get to the device in question, even if the device happens to be on the same LAN segment as the host. The host may have specific routes to the other subnet defined, in which case it will send the packet to the router defined as being a gateway to the other subnet. If the other subnet is not on any defined gateway, then the host will send the packet to the default gateway, if one is defined. Otherwise, it simply discards the packet.

It would surprise me if the local LAN segment on your router really has a subnet of 255.255.255.252. If so, your internet really should not be working. Given an IP of 192.168.1.254, a netmask of 255.255.255.240 would not be a puzzlement. That would allow for 125 internet-available hosts in the range from 192.168.1.129 - 192.168.1.253. It would not surprise me at all to hear the netmask of the WAN on your router is 255.255.255.252, however. No one in their right mind would assign a /30 subnet to an Ethernet LAN segment of a router.

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Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
Again, what I have works.
Well, not so much. Obviously, the setup is by chance not giving you any trouble at the moment, but any LAN with inconsistent netmasks and / or network assignments will encounter issues when one or more hosts is assigned outside the network segment of one or more other hosts, but inside their own. At the very least, it will result in asymmetrical routing and duplicate packets on the LAN. For a wireless LAN, this would be particularly bad. Even on a wired LAN, it wastes bandwidth and impacts throughput. It would not be at all unlikely certain hosts on the network could not talk to other hosts on the network.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
3. DNS (name server address(es). That will depend on your ISP. You should be able to find out from your router or your ISP or maybe some other denizen of the TCF could help you.
Well, the simple way (on a Windows PC) is to pull up something like Settings => Control Panel => Network Connections => Local Area Connection and then go to the <Support> tab and click on <Details>. The DNS servers will be listed there. Note the actual text of the selections will vary from one PC to the next and from one version of Windows to the other, but one should get the idea.

Last edited by lrhorer : 12-03-2012 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 12-03-2012, 04:36 PM   #8
jrtroo
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First- try rebooting the router and the tivos. Start with a clean slate. Do the easy stuff first.
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:21 PM   #9
lpwcomp
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Lhrorer,

You are correct. It is the WAN subnet mask that is 255.255.252.0. The LAN one is indeed 255.255.255.0 and is the one I use in my TiVos

The IP address of my current router/modem/wireless gateway (2Wire, Inc. 3600HGV) is 192.168.1.254 which is what my TiVos have as the gateway address. I have previously used Linksys routers with 192.168.1.1 and a Netgear that also used 192.168.1.254.

Currently, my computer and my TiVos are using different DNSs, as I decided to test the google servers (8.8.8.8 on 8.8.4.4) on the computer and haven't yet switched the TiVos over.
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:21 AM   #10
lrhorer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
It is the WAN subnet mask that is 255.255.252.0. The LAN one is indeed 255.255.255.0 and is the one I use in my TiVos
That makes more sense. I have seen consumer firewall / routers with a /28 LAN subnet (255.255.255.240), but I have never seen any sort of router with a /30 LAN subnet (255.255.255.252). The most common, by far, is /24 (255.255.255.0), allowing for up to 253 hosts (including the router) on the LAN. It is not the best idea to put more than 250 hosts on a subnet, even if it supports it, so most companies with more than 250 hosts on a LAN segment create multiple subnets on the LAN segment, usually managed by the single router. There are most certainly exceptions.

Many WAN subnets are /30, which only allows two host IP addreses to be defined on that network. This is how most ISPs assign an address to a consumer router, and even most business routers. Some businesses need more than just two host IPs, and of course ISPs require lots of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
The IP address of my current router/modem/wireless gateway (2Wire, Inc. 3600HGV) is 192.168.1.254 which is what my TiVos have as the gateway address.
This is an absolute requirement. A gateway is simply the IP address of a router which should know how to forward the packets to the host or network defined by the line in the routing table. The default gateway is the IP address to which any packets destined to a target for which no host route and no network route have been defined are sent. For many devices, like the TiVo, only the local subnet and the default gateway are defined. For others, the routing table can be much more extensive or even huge. A fairly simple one is the one on my primary RAID server:

Code:
RAID-Server:/RAID/Personal_Folders# route
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
10.8.0.2        *               255.255.255.255 UH    0      0        0 tun0
10.8.0.0        10.8.0.2        255.255.255.0   UG    0      0        0 tun0
192.168.1.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0        0 eth1
192.168.0.0     10.8.0.2        255.255.255.0   UG    0      0        0 tun0
default         router          0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth1
As you can see, there is a default gateway on eth1 pointing to the host "router", for all networks. ("Router" is defined as 192.168.1.1 in /etc/hosts.) The routing rule, however, is given any two routes that apply to a specific destination IP, the more specific route always wins. Thus, only traffic that is not in 10.8.0/24 (which will go on the tun0 interface), 192.168.1/24 (on eth1), or 192.168.0/24 (on tun0) will be sent to the 192.168.1.1 gateway. Any traffic going to 192.168.0/24 will be sent to the 10.8.0.2 router on the tun0 interface. Any traffic going to 192.168.1/24 will go directly to the host on the eth1 interface. Any traffic going to 10.8.0/24 will go directly to the host on the tun0 interface. No routing is involved for hosts on either of the latter two subnets.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
I have previously used Linksys routers with 192.168.1.1 and a Netgear that also used 192.168.1.254.
It really does not matter, as long as every host on the subnet knows the correct IP. Most routers allow the user to specifically set at least the network address of the router. Many allow the user to set the host address, as well, and some allow the user to change the subnet mask.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lpwcomp View Post
Currently, my computer and my TiVos are using different DNSs, as I decided to test the google servers (8.8.8.8 on 8.8.4.4) on the computer and haven't yet switched the TiVos over.
That won't hurt as long as the specified DNS servers are either provided by your ISP or else are public servers. Some ISPs, like RoadRuner, will not allow any host with an IP address outside the ISP's domains to make use of them as clients.

Last edited by lrhorer : 12-04-2012 at 02:50 AM.
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Old 12-05-2012, 07:43 AM   #11
jerry872005
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UPDATE - My older tivo (TIVO HD XL) is able to queue shows up to transfer to it from the new tivo (TIVO Elite). The new tivo still will not queue up any shows and will only transfer one at a time. It freezes everytime I go in to add another show to be transferred. The older tivo is using an older tivo adapter (G I think?) and the new tivo is using the new tivo adapter (N I think?). Could the adapter be part of the problem?

Thanks everyone for helping!
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