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Old 09-09-2013, 03:42 PM   #91
Loach
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Originally Posted by jmpage2 View Post
We aren't TiVo executives so none of us knows who they consider competition. If they are smart they do view market disrupters like Roku and ATV as competition even if its on their periphery.

The company I work for makes telephone and network switching equipment and applications. Microsoft was viewed as an upcoming competitor years before they acquired Skype or had LINC communicator to integrate with phone switches.

By way of comparison, MSFT did not take market disruptor Apple seriously as competition in the smartphone space with introduction of the iPhone, with their CEO notoriously mocking the idea of people spending $600 on a "cell phone".... and we know how that one turned out.
Actually we do know, because they write about it in the Business section of their annual report on Form 10-K. And you are right -they consider Roku, et al. as competition on their periphery. See the following excerpt from their most recent 10-K:

Quote:
Competition

We believe that the principal competitive factors in the advanced television market, which includes DVRs and other broadband enabled consumer electronic devices, are brand recognition and awareness, functionality, ease of use, content availability, and pricing. We currently see two primary categories of competitors for the TiVo-Owned channel: DVRs offered by satellite, cable, and telecommunications operators and advanced television products and DVRs offered by consumer electronics and software companies.

Competition in the TiVo-Owned Subscription Business. Our retail products compete in the United States against services sold directly by cable, telecommunications, and satellite operators. These products typically combine pay television reception with DVR functionality; most of these products include multiple tuners, high definition recording, and in some cases multi-room viewing capability. Some of these products are offered at lower prices but in many cases are bundled with other services provided by the operator and the price for the DVR and DVR service may not be apparent to the consumer. In addition, these products are usually professionally installed and may appeal to consumers who do not pro-actively select a DVR service. Additionally, many U.S. cable operators are currently deploying Video on Demand technology, which over time could serve as a substitute to our retail products. We are aware of at least one U.S. cable operator, Cablevision, Inc., which is deploying remote storage-based DVR products. To the extent that cable operators offer regular television programming as part of their server-based VOD offerings and DVR technology, consumers may prefer not to acquire an independent set-top based DVR through retail channels.

Our retail products also compete against products with on-demand internet-enabled services offered by consumer electronics companies including:

•Personal computers: Microsoft based PCs and Apple products (among others) enable a variety of entertainment features and services which offer alternatives to traditional DVR services, primarily via internet delivery of content.
•Broadband capable devices and game consoles: We are seeing a proliferation of broadband enabled devices, such as connected televisions, “smartphones”, single purpose broadband set-top boxes, tablets, and gaming consoles that offer broadband delivered content. Though these devices do not offer the breadth of the TiVo service, they do offer alternative ways to access internet-delivered video content through devices that many consumers may seek to acquire for other purposes. For example, many consumer electronics companies have television or DVD products that are internet enabled and others have built dedicated devices for accessing video over the internet such as AppleTV, Roku, and GoogleTV. Similarly, companies such as Sony and Microsoft have now enabled the digital delivery of video programming over the internet to their game consoles.
Link to the business section of the 10-K.
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Last edited by Loach : 09-09-2013 at 03:45 PM. Reason: Added link to 10-K
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Old 09-09-2013, 05:20 PM   #92
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Good to know. I think it proves the point though that they do view those products as competition... just not "primary" competition.
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Old 09-09-2013, 06:29 PM   #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmpage2 View Post
We aren't TiVo executives so none of us knows who they consider competition. If they are smart they do view market disrupters like Roku and ATV as competition even if its on their periphery.

The company I work for makes telephone and network switching equipment and applications. Microsoft was viewed as an upcoming competitor years before they acquired Skype or had LINC communicator to integrate with phone switches.

By way of comparison, MSFT did not take market disruptor Apple seriously as competition in the smartphone space with introduction of the iPhone, with their CEO notoriously mocking the idea of people spending $600 on a "cell phone".... and we know how that one turned out.
The iPhone is a phone. Does everything a windows phone would do. It's a direct competitor regardless of price. And it already had the mp3 market share tied up, so they were already big in the game.

Plus phones get subsidized.
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Old 09-09-2013, 10:50 PM   #94
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The iPhone is a phone. Does everything a windows phone would do. It's a direct competitor regardless of price. And it already had the mp3 market share tied up, so they were already big in the game.

Plus phones get subsidized.
It doesn't matter whether the device IS a direct competitor, it matters whether or not the incumbent company (in our example MSFT, but also TiVo in this case) views the competitor product as viable competition.

In the case of MSFT they completely under-estimated the effect of the iPhone and MSFTs dismal position in the mobile space today underscores that fact.
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:00 PM   #95
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Good to know. I think it proves the point though that they do view those products as competition... just not "primary" competition.
Agreed.
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