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Old 07-19-2012, 11:29 PM   #1
MojoB
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How to stop Live TV recording?

Is there a way to stop Tivo from automatically recording Live TV? I have an old Tivo, can't afford a new one, and don't want to wear out the hard drive with it constantly recording.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:59 PM   #2
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If you are referring to the Live TV buffer, then the answer would generally be 'no'.

If you can find a channel with no signal, that might alleviate your concerns.

BTW, does this Tivo have a lifetime subscription? If your Tivo decides to bite the dust, it can most likely be repaired. There are places to get replacement parts where all you have to do is swap them out.
If you want to save money and have computer skills, there are people here that can help you do it yourself.
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:47 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by MojoB View Post
Is there a way to stop Tivo from automatically recording Live TV? I have an old Tivo, can't afford a new one, and don't want to wear out the hard drive with it constantly recording.
If your TiVo is plugged in, the hard drive is running.

That's an unavoidable part of the way it's designed.

What's the model number, do you have a lifetime subscription, and what is the hard drive size, or what number of hours is or was the TiVo advertised as being able to record?
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Old 07-30-2012, 11:26 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by steve614 View Post
If you are referring to the Live TV buffer, then the answer would generally be 'no'.

If you can find a channel with no signal, that might alleviate your concerns.

BTW, does this Tivo have a lifetime subscription? If your Tivo decides to bite the dust, it can most likely be repaired. There are places to get replacement parts where all you have to do is swap them out.
If you want to save money and have computer skills, there are people here that can help you do it yourself.
How can you find a channel with no signal because my cable box will not tune itself unless it's a channel on the guide.

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If your TiVo is plugged in, the hard drive is running.

That's an unavoidable part of the way it's designed.

What's the model number, do you have a lifetime subscription, and what is the hard drive size, or what number of hours is or was the TiVo advertised as being able to record?
TCD540040, has lifetime, 40 hour.
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Old 07-31-2012, 12:12 AM   #5
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How can you find a channel with no signal because my cable box will not tune itself unless it's a channel on the guide.



TCD540040, has lifetime, 40 hour.
Most likely expenses in your future:

1. $10 worth of capacitors for the power supply if you can solder or know someone who can.

Go read the wikipedia article about "capacitor plague" so you'll understand if it happens to you.

2. And/or the cost of a replacement hard drive.

You can save money by doing that yourself if you have a computer to which you can hook up the drive and the replacement drive.


Power supply capacitors (in S2s and S3s) and hard drives are more likely to go bad than the motherboard.

Even in standby the 30 minute cache seems to still be recorded (just tried it on a 240), and the hard drive would continue to spin even if it weren't.

I suppose you could unplug it when not in use, but start-up puts extra strain on components and hard drives, so that might actually hasten its demise.
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Old 07-31-2012, 06:24 AM   #6
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Is there a way to stop Tivo from automatically recording Live TV? I have an old Tivo, can't afford a new one, and don't want to wear out the hard drive with it constantly recording.
You cannot stop it from recording everything but you can reduce the number of programs it records.
Press the "TiVo" button. Select "Manage Recordings & downloads." (On standard definition TiVo, select "Find Programs" and select "To do list" to see what your TiVo is set to record and when.)
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Old 07-31-2012, 09:07 AM   #7
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You cannot stop it from recording everything but you can reduce the number of programs it records.
Press the "TiVo" button. Select "Manage Recordings & downloads." (On standard definition TiVo, select "Find Programs" and select "To do list" to see what your TiVo is set to record and when.)
That makes no difference. Whether it is recording something from the TDL or the live buffer, it is still recording. Canceling programs will make no difference on the wear and tear on the hard drive.
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Old 07-31-2012, 09:27 AM   #8
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If the disc went bad, you would not need a new tivo. You could pick up a used one cheap - craigslist is full of 10-20 offers and move the disc over. It is also easy to copy/upgrade- do it now with a new drive and then put your old one in storage- just in case. All for just the cost of the drive.
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Old 07-31-2012, 10:36 PM   #9
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Most likely expenses in your future:

1. $10 worth of capacitors for the power supply if you can solder or know someone who can.

Go read the wikipedia article about "capacitor plague" so you'll understand if it happens to you.

2. And/or the cost of a replacement hard drive.

You can save money by doing that yourself if you have a computer to which you can hook up the drive and the replacement drive.


Power supply capacitors (in S2s and S3s) and hard drives are more likely to go bad than the motherboard.

Even in standby the 30 minute cache seems to still be recorded (just tried it on a 240), and the hard drive would continue to spin even if it weren't.

I suppose you could unplug it when not in use, but start-up puts extra strain on components and hard drives, so that might actually hasten its demise.
I don't know how to solder, could I replace the entire power supply? So you would have to move files from the original hard drive to the new one using your computer?

If you don't replace or repair it yourself, who could do it without losing my lifetime subscription? I guess I will just leave it on, which leads me to another question, how should I turn off my Tivo - just unplug it or do something before that?
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Old 07-31-2012, 11:02 PM   #10
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I don't know how to solder, could I replace the entire power supply? So you would have to move files from the original hard drive to the new one using your computer?

If you don't replace or repair it yourself, who could do it without losing my lifetime subscription? I guess I will just leave it on, which leads me to another question, how should I turn off my Tivo - just unplug it or do something before that?
My preferred method for turning off a TiVo involves either being able to easily access where the power cord plugs into the AC source (like a wall outlet or power strip), or being able to use a switch on a power strip.

That's as opposed to trying to pull the other end of the power cord out of the AC input jack on the back of the TiVo. The fewer times you do that over the lifetime of the TiVo the better.

Before turning it off, I like to be sure it's not in the middle of anything, like downloading or processing guide data.

Then I go into the menus:

Messages and settings-restart or reset system-restart system*--do the 3 thumbs down and then hit the enter key, and as soon as the picture disappears from the screen disconnect the AC supply.

That way, when you plug it back in, it should boot up normally. You're just turning a warm boot into a cold one.

If you put it on standby and then pull the plug, when it boots up it'll go into standby, and there will be nothing on the screen, and you'll have forgotten that you put it in standby, and you'll think that it's broken and waste a lot of time trying to fix it.


*Be sure not to select anything other than restart system, because the next screen gives the same instructions for approval (3 Thumbs Down, then hit Enter) as the more destructive options, so you won't realize your mistake.
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Old 08-01-2012, 05:55 PM   #11
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My preferred method for turning off a TiVo involves either being able to easily access where the power cord plugs into the AC source (like a wall outlet or power strip), or being able to use a switch on a power strip.

That's as opposed to trying to pull the other end of the power cord out of the AC input jack on the back of the TiVo. The fewer times you do that over the lifetime of the TiVo the better.

Before turning it off, I like to be sure it's not in the middle of anything, like downloading or processing guide data.

Then I go into the menus:

Messages and settings-restart or reset system-restart system*--do the 3 thumbs down and then hit the enter key, and as soon as the picture disappears from the screen disconnect the AC supply.

That way, when you plug it back in, it should boot up normally. You're just turning a warm boot into a cold one.

If you put it on standby and then pull the plug, when it boots up it'll go into standby, and there will be nothing on the screen, and you'll have forgotten that you put it in standby, and you'll think that it's broken and waste a lot of time trying to fix it.


*Be sure not to select anything other than restart system, because the next screen gives the same instructions for approval (3 Thumbs Down, then hit Enter) as the more destructive options, so you won't realize your mistake.
Ok sounds good.

Now regarding the other stuff if I can't solder can I replace the entire power supply?

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2. And/or the cost of a replacement hard drive.

You can save money by doing that yourself if you have a computer to which you can hook up the drive and the replacement drive.
Would I have to move files from original hard drive to new one using a computer?

Do you know of any places that repair Tivo without losing my lifetime?
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:06 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by unitron View Post
My preferred method for turning off a TiVo involves either being able to easily access where the power cord plugs into the AC source (like a wall outlet or power strip), or being able to use a switch on a power strip.

That's as opposed to trying to pull the other end of the power cord out of the AC input jack on the back of the TiVo. The fewer times you do that over the lifetime of the TiVo the better.

Before turning it off, I like to be sure it's not in the middle of anything, like downloading or processing guide data.

Then I go into the menus:

Messages and settings-restart or reset system-restart system*--do the 3 thumbs down and then hit the enter key, and as soon as the picture disappears from the screen disconnect the AC supply.

That way, when you plug it back in, it should boot up normally. You're just turning a warm boot into a cold one.

If you put it on standby and then pull the plug, when it boots up it'll go into standby, and there will be nothing on the screen, and you'll have forgotten that you put it in standby, and you'll think that it's broken and waste a lot of time trying to fix it.


*Be sure not to select anything other than restart system, because the next screen gives the same instructions for approval (3 Thumbs Down, then hit Enter) as the more destructive options, so you won't realize your mistake.
the first thing you do after bootup is hit the TiVo button. If it's in standby it will come out of standby. I always do this on the Premiere I bring back from my GFs since she put's it in standby when we are finished watching.
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Old 08-01-2012, 06:24 PM   #13
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Now regarding the other stuff if I can't solder can I replace the entire power supply?
Yes. You can buy power supplies from e-bay or Weaknees.

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Originally Posted by MojoB View Post
Would I have to move files from original hard drive to new one using a computer?
If you're referring to a hard drive replacement, then yes... but not like you would think.
Before you replace the hard drive, you have to transfer the recordings to your computer using Tivo Desktop (or 3rd party equivelent) for temporary storage. Once the new hard drive is in the Tivo, you transfer them back.
If you have to replace the Tivo hard drive because of failure, then your recordings are hosed. There is no way to recover recordings directly off the hard drive on a computer.

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Do you know of any places that repair Tivo without losing my lifetime?
Weaknees offers to repair Tivos. I don't know what level they go to in the event of a failure on the motherboard, but it is there.

http://www.weaknees.com/flat-fee-tivo-repair.php

http://www.weaknees.com/s3-s4-repairs.php
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:29 AM   #14
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Yes. You can buy power supplies from e-bay or Weaknees.


If you're referring to a hard drive replacement, then yes... but not like you would think.
Before you replace the hard drive, you have to transfer the recordings to your computer using Tivo Desktop (or 3rd party equivelent) for temporary storage. Once the new hard drive is in the Tivo, you transfer them back.
If you have to replace the Tivo hard drive because of failure, then your recordings are hosed. There is no way to recover recordings directly off the hard drive on a computer.



Weaknees offers to repair Tivos. I don't know what level they go to in the event of a failure on the motherboard, but it is there.

http://www.weaknees.com/flat-fee-tivo-repair.php

http://www.weaknees.com/s3-s4-repairs.php
Are you referring to just being able to normally replace the power supply or being able to replace the power supply to fix broken capacitors?

What if i don't care about the recordings on the Tivo do I still need to do anything with a computer to replace the hard drive? It would be nice to upgrade from this 40 hour as it is now anyways since it only gets like 10 hours on best quality.

It looks like they will repair anything wrong for that flat-fee on the older Tivos like mine. Good to know!
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Old 08-02-2012, 06:25 AM   #15
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Are you referring to just being able to normally replace the power supply or being able to replace the power supply to fix broken capacitors?
I'm saying that you can buy a power supply module and just swap it out.
No soldering necessary, but you do have to know how to use a torx screwdriver.

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What if i don't care about the recordings on the Tivo do I still need to do anything with a computer to replace the hard drive?
Yes, if you do it yourself. Basically, you have to copy the *TiVo software* onto the new hard drive.
This can be done in Windows with WinMFS, or you can burn a boot CD of the MFS Live software.

Read up on the subject here:
http://www.mfslive.org/fullguide.htm

Edit: For an additional cost, you can also buy new hard drives with the Tivo software pre-loaded and just swap them out.

Edit #2: Since you have a Series 2 Tivo, you would either need to find an IDE hard drive for replacement or get an IDE to SATA adapter*.

* Only certain adapters are compatible.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:00 AM   #16
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Is there a way to stop Tivo from automatically recording Live TV? I have an old Tivo, can't afford a new one, and don't want to wear out the hard drive with it constantly recording.
Is there anything currently wrong with your TiVo?

If not, keep an eye on Craigslist for someone selling the same model cheap, like $10, may $20 at a maximum provided there's nothing wrong with it and the little TiVo guy hasn't come off the front panel. You might even find someone giving one away.

And it doesn't have to be a TCD540040, it can be a 540080 or a 540120--same machine, bigger hard drive.

That'll give you one you can practicing taking apart without hurting your lifetimed one or interrupting your viewing, and it'll give you a source of parts for cannibilization.

If there is something wrong with your TiVo, keep an eye on Craigslist for someone selling the same model cheap.

And familiarize yourself with the TiVo Desktop program.
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:39 PM   #17
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I'm saying that you can buy a power supply module and just swap it out.
No soldering necessary, but you do have to know how to use a torx screwdriver.



Yes, if you do it yourself. Basically, you have to copy the *TiVo software* onto the new hard drive.
This can be done in Windows with WinMFS, or you can burn a boot CD of the MFS Live software.

Read up on the subject here:
http://www.mfslive.org/fullguide.htm

Edit: For an additional cost, you can also buy new hard drives with the Tivo software pre-loaded and just swap them out.

Edit #2: Since you have a Series 2 Tivo, you would either need to find an IDE hard drive for replacement or get an IDE to SATA adapter*.

* Only certain adapters are compatible.
Have you used WinMFS before, how complicated is it in terms of how much tech knowledge required? If you buy a hard drive with Tivo pre-loaded would weaknees.com be the best option?

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Is there anything currently wrong with your TiVo?

If not, keep an eye on Craigslist for someone selling the same model cheap, like $10, may $20 at a maximum provided there's nothing wrong with it and the little TiVo guy hasn't come off the front panel. You might even find someone giving one away.

And it doesn't have to be a TCD540040, it can be a 540080 or a 540120--same machine, bigger hard drive.

That'll give you one you can practicing taking apart without hurting your lifetimed one or interrupting your viewing, and it'll give you a source of parts for cannibilization.

If there is something wrong with your TiVo, keep an eye on Craigslist for someone selling the same model cheap.

And familiarize yourself with the TiVo Desktop program.
Nothing wrong with the Tivo except the stupid infomercials it keeps recording, which I forget how to stop. Called Tivo weeks back they said it was pre-tivo central messages but I think it might be showcase data. Still gotta look into that, sorry for the rant.

Say I buy another Tivo, how does the MAK work say if both have lifetime on them?

What do I need to learn about Tivo Desktop?
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Old 08-04-2012, 12:50 AM   #18
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Have you used WinMFS before, how complicated is it in terms of how much tech knowledge required?
Very little. It's a very straightforward program with a simple interface.

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Originally Posted by MojoB View Post
If you buy a hard drive with Tivo pre-loaded would weaknees.com be the best option?
Well, there aren't too many others. They are bit pricey, but I have never seen anyone complain of the quality of the product. I would never consider one as an option, but anyone whose knees shake at the thought of holding a soldering iron or writing a simple script might be well served by buying one.

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Say I buy another Tivo, how does the MAK work say if both have lifetime on them?
The MAK has nothing to do with which service plans one chooses, only with who pays for them. As long as the same person pays for both plans, they get the same MAK.

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What do I need to learn about Tivo Desktop?
That it is a horrible program.
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Old 08-04-2012, 07:10 AM   #19
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Have you used WinMFS before, how complicated is it in terms of how much tech knowledge required? If you buy a hard drive with Tivo pre-loaded would weaknees.com be the best option?



Nothing wrong with the Tivo except the stupid infomercials it keeps recording, which I forget how to stop. Called Tivo weeks back they said it was pre-tivo central messages but I think it might be showcase data. Still gotta look into that, sorry for the rant.

Say I buy another Tivo, how does the MAK work say if both have lifetime on them?

What do I need to learn about Tivo Desktop?
Desktop does have it's limitations, quirks, and annoyances, but I still find it useful.

When you install the TiVo Desktop program on your computer(s), you enter the MAK which is associated with your account. Series 2 and newer TiVos are informed by the TiVo servers what MAK is associated with their TiVo Service Numbers. It's the same MAK, because the TSNs are associated with your account. Even if you only have one TiVo and have never installed TiVo Desktop anywhere, there's still a unique MAK associated with your account.

(actually, even if you only have one or more Series 1 TiVos, there's a MAK associated with your account--the S1s just can't do anything with it.)

That MAK lets stuff on your home network, like TiVos and computers running Desktop, know that they can, subject to certain rules and conditions, share stuff.

Lifetime subs and the MAK don't really have anything to do with one another, at least not directly.

In order for the TiVo to be able to do anything on your home network it has to have a current and valid subscription of some sort. Could be lifetime, once a year*, once every 3 years*, monthly, whatever, it just can't be unsubscribed.

The MAK is basically a sort of password.

If your budgetary constraints are as severe as your first post implied, then you need to consider a "roll your own" approach to drive upgrade or replacement.

It's not terribly difficult if you have the necessary equipment, which is pretty much a computer and some extra hard drive attaching cables.



*I don't think the once a year and once every 3 years payment options are currently offered, but they might be grandfathered for some owners, the way lower monthly rates are for some.
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:45 PM   #20
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Very little. It's a very straightforward program with a simple interface.


Well, there aren't too many others. They are bit pricey, but I have never seen anyone complain of the quality of the product. I would never consider one as an option, but anyone whose knees shake at the thought of holding a soldering iron or writing a simple script might be well served by buying one.


The MAK has nothing to do with which service plans one chooses, only with who pays for them. As long as the same person pays for both plans, they get the same MAK.


That it is a horrible program.
My main concern in doing a hard drive upgrade myself would be downloading something off some non-mainstream site and getting malware or a virus or screwing up my computer settings.

So how does the MAK work with Tivo Desktop if I have my Tivo and I buy someone else's Tivo off Craigslist that has lifetime on it. I will have 2 different MAK's right so then do I just change the MAK within Tivo desktop every time I want to transfer from each Tivo?

Unitron what part of Tivo desktop would I want to familiarize myself with and why?
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Old 08-06-2012, 12:38 AM   #21
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My main concern in doing a hard drive upgrade myself would be downloading something off some non-mainstream site and getting malware or a virus
Use a virus scanner. Dozens of people on this site can testify the official distribution of WinMFS from http://www.mfslive.org is virus free. If you really have a bug up your butt about it, use MFS_Live. It's a linux distro on a live CD. Linux does not have viruses.

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or screwing up my computer settings.
Then re-load from your backups.

WinMFS won't screw up your computer settings.

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So how does the MAK work with Tivo Desktop
Extremely poorly. Not at all if you have a LAN server. Or a decent OS.

The MAK allows TDT to log in and download information and files from the TiVo.

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if I have my Tivo and I buy someone else's Tivo off Craigslist that has lifetime on it. I will have 2 different MAK's right so then do I just change the MAK within Tivo desktop every time I want to transfer from each Tivo?
I suppose you could, but that would pretty much defeat the primary purpose of the MAK. That, plus the previous owner should never really share his MAK with you, or anyone else. Neither should you. A much better solution is to call TiVo and have the new TiVo transferred to your account, at which point in time (well, within 48 hours) it will obtain the same MAK as the other TiVo on your account. Note the MAK doesn't really have anything directly to do with TDT, per se. The MAK is required when logging in to the TiVo from any utility, including kmttg, pyTivo (for pushes only), streambaby, HME for Python and any of its tools, another TiVo, or any old web browser. It's also required for TDT.

Here I am logging in to one of my TiVos using a web browser (FireFox):



The user name is "tivo". The password is my MAK. Every other TiVo application that attempts to contact the TiVo using SHTTP, including TDT, does the exact same thing behind the scenes. The MAK is also used as an encryption / decryption key for decrypting .TiVo files. Again, this is true no matter what utility is doing the decryption.

Note if you download any shows off the new TiVo when it has its old MAK, then those files can only be decrypted using the old MAK.

Last edited by lrhorer : 08-06-2012 at 12:55 AM.
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Old 08-06-2012, 12:56 AM   #22
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My main concern in doing a hard drive upgrade myself would be downloading something off some non-mainstream site and getting malware or a virus or screwing up my computer settings.

So how does the MAK work with Tivo Desktop if I have my Tivo and I buy someone else's Tivo off Craigslist that has lifetime on it. I will have 2 different MAK's right so then do I just change the MAK within Tivo desktop every time I want to transfer from each Tivo?

Unitron what part of Tivo desktop would I want to familiarize myself with and why?
When you buy a TiVo for which someone else has already purchased Product Lifetime Service, you need to contact TiVo to have it transferred to your account (where your current TiVo already is).

It wouldn't hurt for the seller to contact them and inform them that they've sold it, but since you already have a TiVo account you have a certain amount of credibility with them and they may just take your word for it, especially if the new one seems to be contacting them from the same location as your old one.

Your account already has a MAK assigned, and any and all TiVos on that account will be informed of that number.

If and when you install the TiVo Desktop program on a computer, you'll need to enter the MAK, which you can get from the system info page in the menus or from going online to TiVo and logging onto your account.

I suggest that you set aside a fair amount of hard drive space on the computer in the form of a separate partition, formatted NTFS, for Desktop to actually copy shows to. It can be on a separate hard drive if you wish and can afford one.

Desktop itself can install to your C: drive, in the "Program Files" folder, whether it's NT or FAT32, but FAT32 has a file size limitation that will turn a 2 hour show at best quality into a movie with the last 5 minutes missing.

NTFS avoids that.

Desktop creates a "My TiVo Recordings" folder, but there's a place in its menus where you can tell it to use a different location for that folder. You should also tell it to put its cache folder there.

If you screw up, you can uninstall and try again before you actually start copying shows. Desktop calls it transferring, but it's really copying, it doesn't erase the original.

If you're going to copy shows from one TiVo to another, I recommend using Desktop as an intermediary because that preserves more of the meta-data that goes along with the show, like the date when you originally recorded it and the stuff you see when you hit the "Info" button.

You only get one MAK per account, you will only have one account, and all of the TiVos on that account will be assigned that one MAK, and any and all computers on your home network running TiVo Desktop will need that same MAK entered when you install Desktop on them.

That one MAK is what tells the TiVos and the computers running Desktop that they're allowed to talk to each other.

I can hook you up with a clean 540 image, and direct you to clean copies of MFS Live, WinMFS, and Desktop.

As far as I know no one has gone to the trouble to produce infected verisons.
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:10 AM   #23
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I suggest that you set aside a fair amount of hard drive space on the computer in the form of a separate partition, formatted NTFS, for Desktop to actually copy shows to. It can be on a separate hard drive if you wish and can afford one.
But not on another computer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unitron View Post
Desktop creates a "My TiVo Recordings" folder, but there's a place in its menus where you can tell it to use a different location for that folder. You should also tell it to put its cache folder there.
But only if it is on the same computer running TDT. If one has a NAS or a LAN server, TDT is hosed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unitron View Post
If you're going to copy shows from one TiVo to another, I recommend using Desktop as an intermediary because that preserves more of the meta-data that goes along with the show, like the date when you originally recorded it and the stuff you see when you hit the "Info" button.
With the caveat there is a huge time penalty. TiVoToGo and GoBack are quite slow on S3 TiVos, but they are slow as molasses on an S2. MRV is at least a bit faster. GoBack with h.264 coding on an S3 is much, much faster, but both avoid the use of TDT. I really have very little issue with living without the extra metadata.
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Old 08-06-2012, 01:48 AM   #24
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I'm not sure we need to start off by throwing the OP in the deep end.

Baby steps.
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:58 PM   #25
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I can hook you up with a clean 540 image, and direct you to clean copies of MFS Live, WinMFS, and Desktop.
What is a 540 image? Right now I'm not going to do any upgrade. I have to work on some other stuff first. But maybe if I reach that point I would ask about how to do that and where to get MFS Live. When you say Desktop I take it you mean Tivo Desktop? I have that running now. What I'd like to do first is be able to transfer my Tivo recordings to a format I can stream on my PS3 and burn to DVD on my PC.
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Old 08-10-2012, 05:20 AM   #26
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What is a 540 image? Right now I'm not going to do any upgrade. I have to work on some other stuff first. But maybe if I reach that point I would ask about how to do that and where to get MFS Live. When you say Desktop I take it you mean Tivo Desktop? I have that running now. What I'd like to do first is be able to transfer my Tivo recordings to a format I can stream on my PS3 and burn to DVD on my PC.
You have a TCD540040, which is the model casually referred to as the 540, which can actually mean the one with the 40GB, 80GB, or 120GB hard drive.

You can, before your 40GB drive goes bad, use MFS Live, or WinMFS, to make a truncated backup of the drive, which won't have any of the shows but will have the operating system and TiVo software, and whatever settings you've established, like zip code, area code, cable company, whether it's set up for satellite or not, and I think season passes, thumb ratings, favorites, and stuff like that, and it'll have a record of the TiVo Service Number of your unit.

If you use someone else's image, because you didn't make your own and your hard drive went bad and now it's too late, you'll have to go through Guided Setup all over again.

Also, whatever size stock TiVo drive the image was made from is the smallest size drive onto which you can restore that image.

For example, if you image your 40GB* drive, you can restore onto a 60GB, but if you get an image made from someone's TCD540080, no go.

If I capitalize Desktop, at least around here, then I'm almost certainly talking about the free version of the TiVo Desktop program.

You should go to mfslive.org, read everything about MFS Live and about WinMFS, at least the white background instructional pages, and also go to the download link, which'll take you over to the forum pages, where you can find the link for the bootable cd image for MFS Live v1.4

Even if you don't own a TiVo you should download that and burn, as an image, yourself a copy onto cd-r.

It's got stuff that lets you play with hard drives.

You should also get WinMFS

Both WinMFS and MFS Live can make and restore TiVo backups, but not each others, so use both and make 2 different backups so that you can restore with either program.

Once you use TiVo Desktop to copy your recordings to the computer, you can, I am told by others here and have no reason to doubt, convert them into "un-tivo'ed" files.

I don't think I can give you beter answers than you've received here:

http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb...d.php?t=490550

I will say this about Desktop.

You should have a (large) partition that's formatted NTFS and not FAT32 to put the My TiVo Recordings folder in/on, because FAT32's file size limitation turns a 2 hour movie into a movie missing the last 5 minutes.

When you install Desktop it automatically wants to put everything on the C: drive just like everything else that has anything to do with Windows does, but in the options you can change where it keeps that folder.

Also, once shows have been copied by Desktop to the MTR folder, you can move them to other, perhaps larger, locations, and put a shortcut to those locations inside the MTR folder.

At least as long as that other location is on a local hard drive (one actually hooked directly to the computer running TDT).


Perhaps you should PM or email me a list of your TiVo and computer hardware and an idea of what kind of budget, if any, you have to make changes and improvements, and I can better advise you.


*some of the Series 2 TiVos used Maxtor brand hard drives that had a slightly larger LBA number for the same nominal size than other brands, so, for example, my TCD540040 image won't restore onto a 40GB Western Digital or Seagate, because it expects a little more room.
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:05 AM   #27
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rt
If and when I upgrade my Tivo hard drive, I wouldn't mind going through guided setup but I would worry if I didn't have the Tivo Service Number and I needed to have it for some reason. I'm assuming the OS and Tivo Software would install the latest version after setup.

I cannot do this right now because I have to fix my computer first and have other crap to work on unfortunately. Thank you for your help.
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:15 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by MojoB View Post
If and when I upgrade my Tivo hard drive, I wouldn't mind going through guided setup but I would worry if I didn't have the Tivo Service Number and I needed to have it for some reason. I'm assuming the OS and Tivo Software would install the latest version after setup.

I cannot do this right now because I have to fix my computer first and have other crap to work on unfortunately. Thank you for your help.
The TiVo already knows what its TiVo Service Number is.

At least the motherboard does, and the hard drive will learn it from the motherboard.

TiVos, at least S2s, have both a unique serial number and a TiVo Service Number.

The TiVo Service Number (which is printed on the sticker on the back of the TiVo where the AC line cord plugs in) is unique to each TiVo, and, up through the original Series 3, was on a separate crypto chip which, with some difficulty, could be moved from one motherboard to another of the same overall model, and since the servers at TiVo keep track of what kind of, if any, subscription a particular TiVo has by that number, you can move a lifetime sub from one motherboard to another of the same model.

Or you can move the TSN of a non-lifetimed board so as to still be able to access 2TB worth of recordings, like I had to.

For instance, your 540 would have the same motherboard regardless of whether it originally came with a 40GB, 80GB, or 120GB hard drive, so any of those would be crypto chip transplant candidates.


The MAK is a unique number assigned to your overall TiVo account, is not located on the motherboard, and is shared by all the TiVos on that account and any computers running TiVo Desktop on your home network.
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Old 08-14-2012, 09:22 PM   #29
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The TiVo Service Number (which is printed on the sticker on the back of the TiVo where the AC line cord plugs in) is unique to each TiVo, and, up through the original Series 3, was on a separate crypto chip which, with some difficulty, could be moved from one motherboard to another of the same overall model, and since the servers at TiVo keep track of what kind of, if any, subscription a particular TiVo has by that number, you can move a lifetime sub from one motherboard to another of the same model.
By "original Series 3", do you mean the OLED?

If so, is that implying that it is NOT possible to do that on the TivoHD nor Premiere models?
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Old 08-15-2012, 03:22 AM   #30
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By "original Series 3", do you mean the OLED?

If so, is that implying that it is NOT possible to do that on the TivoHD nor Premiere models?
Yepper.

The TCD648 still had the separate crypto chip.

Starting with the 652 and 658, the TSN is built into a bigger chip along with a bunch of other stuff, and it's on there in such a way that it's cheaper to buy a new TiVo and lifetime sub than the equipment needed to do the removals and replacements.

I think the "prom day" guy over on the "other site" discusses it some.
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