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View Full Version : Spoilers don't spoil anything.


Hoffer
08-11-2011, 03:06 PM
http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/08/spoilers-dont-spoil-anything.ars

I just read the above article and had to come post about it here.

Some psychologist did a study and found that people actually enjoyed a book more if they new how it ended before they started reading it. That people experience stress while reading a book wondering how it ends.

zalusky
08-11-2011, 03:25 PM
A lot of movies spoil themselves. You know the technique where they show you the end and you have to figure out how they go there. Momento was the ultimate.

CatScratchFever
08-11-2011, 03:40 PM
My Mom always reads the final chapter of the book she's reading first, I don't get it myself.

pkscout
08-11-2011, 04:18 PM
You would have to define "enjoyed" more specifically. I might get less stressed, worried, or upset during a TV show or movie if I know the ending, but in my mind that makes me an even more passive participant in the experience than I already am and makes the overall experience less enjoyable. I really hate those "three days earlier" episodes partially for that very reason.

zalusky
08-11-2011, 04:40 PM
You just have to enjoy the ride and not worry about where your going!
Mad Men for example never really had cliff hangers it was more about the ride.

bleen
08-11-2011, 04:41 PM
So how does this thread end http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-6/236435/th_munch.gif?

jsmeeker
08-11-2011, 04:43 PM
So how does this thread end http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-6/236435/th_munch.gif?




We find out that we are all batteries

jsmeeker
08-11-2011, 04:44 PM
You just have to enjoy the ride and not worry about where your going!
Mad Men for example never really had cliff hangers it was more about the ride.

I got "spoiled" a few times by watching some of the bonus materials on the BluRay discs I was getting from NetFlix.

Jonathan_S
08-11-2011, 05:05 PM
We find out that we are all batteries

Used in conjunction with fusion reactors :rolleyes:

I may enjoy rereading a book when I know how it ends, but I don't want to give up the "stress" of wondering how things will turn out or what surprised might appear to throw things off course.

In my personal experience if I know of a spoiler for a book or movie I spend more time looking for when it's going to pop up or trying to figure out how they're going to get there and can't just enjoy the story.
That different from rereading or rewatching because in those cases I know exactly how its going to go so I can focus of enjoying the dialog, setting, characters, writing, etc (or appreciate foreshadowning or red herrings I didn't pick up on the first time)

scooterboy
08-11-2011, 05:49 PM
My Mom always reads the final chapter of the book she's reading first, I don't get it myself.

My wife reads novels to her mother for an hour every night (MIL has lost most of her sight). Every time they start a new book, MIL asks wife if she'll read the last couple of pages first. Wife never does, but MIL always asks. :)

Whenever the in-laws were over to watch a movie, MIL always asked for spoilers ("Is he going to die?" "are they going to make it?").

LoadStar
08-11-2011, 06:00 PM
http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/08/spoilers-dont-spoil-anything.ars

I just read the above article and had to come post about it here.

Some psychologist did a study and found that people actually enjoyed a book more if they new how it ended before they started reading it. That people experience stress while reading a book wondering how it ends.

And a roller coaster would be less stressful if it didn't have all those hills and loops and going fast and stuff. It also wouldn't be fun.

sieglinde
08-11-2011, 09:55 PM
I am reading the fifth book of the Ice and Fire series. There are wikis dedicated to this series. I have been looking up characters that I am afraid are going to get killed. :)

Bierboy
08-11-2011, 10:07 PM
Used in conjunction with fusion reactors :rolleyes:


...and flux capacitors...

lambertman
08-11-2011, 10:20 PM
So how does this thread end http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-6/236435/th_munch.gif?

The shocking return of !!!Aardvark!!!

mattack
08-11-2011, 10:54 PM
I think that people are a bit too caught up on spoilers.. I've watched TV poker tournaments knowing who would win. (I don't remember at the moment, but at one point I already knew who was in the November Nine even though I am going to keep watching the WSOP episodes on Tuesdays.) Sure, I try not to be spoiled and try not to spoil others, but it doesn't completely ruin the thing.

This reminds me of my puzzlement about people who immediately delete recordings of a show that was cancelled. If they liked the show while it was in production, why not watch the rest? I do, EVEN if it ends up in a cliffhanger that's never resolved.

By the way:
He's his father.
He was dead the whole time.
They're both the same guy.
It's a sled.
They're in a forest in the modern time.

john4200
08-11-2011, 10:59 PM
By the way:
He's his father.
He was dead the whole time.
They're both the same guy.
It's a sled.
They're in a forest in the modern time.

What is worse than spoilers? Vague spoilers. Here are my guesses:

Star Wars
Sixth Sense
?
Citizen Kane
?

VegasVic
08-11-2011, 11:05 PM
My ex wife was like that. She wanted to know as much as she could about a movie or TV show ahead of time. Drove me crazy. But far down the list of reasons shes my ex. :)

murgatroyd
08-11-2011, 11:12 PM
I am reading the fifth book of the Ice and Fire series. There are wikis dedicated to this series. I have been looking up characters that I am afraid are going to get killed. :)

Why look it up?

valar morghulis

LoadStar
08-11-2011, 11:22 PM
What is worse than spoilers? Vague spoilers. Here are my guesses:

Star Wars
Sixth Sense
?
Citizen Kane
?

The third is The Usual Suspects, I'm pretty sure, and the fifth is The Village.

cstelter
08-11-2011, 11:41 PM
The third is The Usual Suspects, I'm pretty sure, and the fifth is The Village.

I tought the 3rd might be Fight Club...

Hcour
08-11-2011, 11:59 PM
http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2011/08/spoilers-dont-spoil-anything.ars

I just read the above article and had to come post about it here.

Some psychologist did a study and found that people actually enjoyed a book more if they new how it ended before they started reading it. That people experience stress while reading a book wondering how it ends.

Stress? What? When reading a book?

If you're experiencing "stress" while reading a book, er, you're not doing it right. Reading is supposed to be, you know, relaxing, enjoyable. And writers put the ending at the ending for a reason - because you're not supposed to know what happens at the end until the ending.

What silliness.

cheesesteak
08-12-2011, 09:20 AM
Spoilers don't bother me at all. My memory is so bad that I'll more than likely forget the spoiler if the spoiled event is in an episode two weeks away. Even if I remember the spoiler, I'm still interested in seeing how they pull it off.

TAsunder
08-12-2011, 10:47 AM
I think that people are a bit too caught up on spoilers.. I've watched TV poker tournaments knowing who would win. (I don't remember at the moment, but at one point I already knew who was in the November Nine even though I am going to keep watching the WSOP episodes on Tuesdays.) Sure, I try not to be spoiled and try not to spoil others, but it doesn't completely ruin the thing.

This reminds me of my puzzlement about people who immediately delete recordings of a show that was cancelled. If they liked the show while it was in production, why not watch the rest? I do, EVEN if it ends up in a cliffhanger that's never resolved.

By the way:
He's his father.
He was dead the whole time.
They're both the same guy.
It's a sled.
They're in a forest in the modern time.

That was a lot to type. You should just get this t-shirt.

http://www.threadless.com/product/844/Spoilt

Steveknj
08-12-2011, 12:32 PM
I go either way. I can't tell you how many books I've read where I've seen the movie first, and enjoyed the book so much better (recently Game of Thrones). And vice versa. I don't think it spoiled my enjoyment either way. But I do read the books differently. I do look at a character or event and compare to what I've seen in the movie.

I generally don't read the ending first though. And I think I get more upset over TV spoiler than I do about a book or movie. I think perhaps because a TV series is just that, a series, and I don't want to know what happened in episode 5 before I've seen episode 4.

terpfan1980
08-12-2011, 12:36 PM
Nice to see this news making the rounds, but I'm sure it will solve nothing here at TCF :o

Hoffer
08-12-2011, 01:09 PM
I tought the 3rd might be Fight Club...

This is what I thought as well.

Fahtrim
08-12-2011, 02:58 PM
psychologists, studies, pansies, super sensitives, society's so soft, political correctness


bah

Johnny Dancing
08-12-2011, 03:29 PM
My Mom always reads the final chapter of the book she's reading first, I don't get it myself.
My high school GF was a speed reader. She could knock out a book in a few evenings. She told me she always read the last chapter first.

I remember thinking how odd that was and considered it a character flaw.

We broke up after only a few months.

Amnesia
08-12-2011, 03:53 PM
Some psychologist did a study and found that people actually enjoyed a book more if they new how it ended before they started reading it.That is certainly not what the study showed. It showed that the average enjoyment of a spoiled reader in the study was greater than the average enjoyment of an unspoiled reader in the study. For all we know, it could be that spoilerphiles get increased enjoyment from being spoiled that outweigh the decreased enjoyment of spoilerphobes. Also, perhaps there are on average more spoilerphiles than -phobes.

The results are also (naturally) limited to the texts employed in the study---that is, to assigned reading. There is no reason to assume that this phenomena would also apply when people are reading (much less watching) media of their own selection.

mrdazzo7
08-12-2011, 05:06 PM
To me, knowing how something ends absolutely has an impact on how I enjoy the story. When I look back at the TV moments that have stuck with me and that I find to be "great moments" it's always something I never saw coming until it happened. If I had known these things would happen, it wouldn't have had the same feeling.

I really hate those "three days earlier" episodes partially for that very reason.

I don't always hate these but most of the time they just don't have a purpose. I think shows rely on them when they feel there isn't enough shock/action/surprises/whatever in the first act and so that's how they solve the problem. A lot of what I read in terms of screenwriting emphasizes the idea that major s*** has to happen IMMEDIATELY or people will lose interest.

I think viewers should get a little more credit than that and just let the story unfold because it's gonna go somewhere. Sometimes the "three days earlier" bit can make an episode better because as you watch you're trying to figure out how it can possibly get to that point but more often than not I would say they're using it as a crutch. I'm fine with something having a slow build up as long as the payoff justifies it though.

You just have to enjoy the ride and not worry about where your going! Mad Men for example never really had cliff hangers it was more about the ride.

I look at LIFE as a ride but when I read a book, watch a movie, or stick with a TV show for a long time, I want a story, with a beginning middle and some kind of end. I don't want to know the end ahead of time since getting to the end is what's fun, because if it's done right it's always more impactful when you don't see it coming. The first season finale of 24 wouldn't have had nearly the same WTF-ness had I known it ahead of time, same goes for countless other things.

The only time I'm really OK with spoilers is when they relate to a storyline I'm not happy with and even then, I'd rather they be vague. I had watched the first ten minutes of Torchwood Children of Earth before stopping then starting the show from the beginning. Based on that ten minutes I knew certain things that made me enjoy the show a bit more because I knew certain aspects were gonna end a certain way and I was happy about it. I don't think I'd feel the if it was a story point I actually liked.

But anyway, generally it doesn't make sense to me that people would want to know in advance how a movie or series would end. It's supposed to be a "journey" you're taking with the characters or whatever so why not let it happen as it happens. It's the same reason I never try to figure out "who did it" or anything--just let it unfold.

alansh
08-12-2011, 05:08 PM
He's right, though, that NO SPOILERS is relatively recent. It used to be that you'd just go to the movies whenever and start watching at whatever point you arrived. You'd then watch through the next showing and when you got to the same point, "this is where I came in" and leave.

Seems like Hitchcock's Psycho was one of the first that made a big deal about it.

I'm pro-spoilers myself. I almost always look up a movie on TheMovieSpoiler.com (http://www.themoviespoiler.com) before going.

jsmeeker
08-12-2011, 05:16 PM
He's right, though, that NO SPOILERS is relatively recent. It used to be that you'd just go to the movies whenever and start watching at whatever point you arrived. You'd then watch through the next showing and when you got to the same point, "this is where I came in" and leave.



Seriously? When was this? I don't think it occured in my life time. And I'm 41 years old.

scooterboy
08-12-2011, 10:31 PM
He's right, though, that NO SPOILERS is relatively recent. It used to be that you'd just go to the movies whenever and start watching at whatever point you arrived. You'd then watch through the next showing and when you got to the same point, "this is where I came in" and leave.

I've never heard of anyone doing that, ever.

And I'm older than Smeek.

mattack
08-12-2011, 10:47 PM
What is worse than spoilers? Vague spoilers.

DUH, I did it that way ON PURPOSE.

mattack
08-12-2011, 10:47 PM
I tought the 3rd might be Fight Club...

DING DING DING.. we have a winner.

john4200
08-12-2011, 11:54 PM
DUH, I did it that way ON PURPOSE.

DUH, I know.

alansh
08-14-2011, 08:18 PM
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2270/why-are-they-called-trailers-if-theyre-shown-em-before-em-the-movie
Those familiar with early movie-theater logistics have pointed out that trailers shown after the feature served an important function beyond that of enticing patrons to come back for future shows: they also helped clear patrons out of the current show. Early theaters typically screened a variety of films in a repeating loop, and it was standard practice for customers to come in whenever they wanted and stay as long as they wanted. Theaters, and the movie studios that owned them, were therefore always looking for ways to keep audience turnover brisk. Apparently it was felt that running trailers between the features helped break up the hypnotic flow of entertainment, giving viewers a chance to snap out of it and at least consider moving along.

Like I said, Psycho was an early "no spoilers" movie, but seeing a film only from the start didn't really catch on until the 1960s. Early on, of course, it was just a matter of logistics -- if you didn't get the newspaper and you didn't have a phone, there was no way to tell when the next showing was without actually going to the theater. And if you're there, why not just go inside?

I remember walking into matinee double-features as late as 1970, but I think that custom died off pretty shortly after that.

Bierboy
08-14-2011, 09:37 PM
He's right, though, that NO SPOILERS is relatively recent. It used to be that you'd just go to the movies whenever and start watching at whatever point you arrived. You'd then watch through the next showing and when you got to the same point, "this is where I came in" and leave...

Did that a lot when I was a kid....but, then, I'm older than the oldest dirt...

efilippi
08-15-2011, 12:52 AM
He's right, though, that NO SPOILERS is relatively recent. It used to be that you'd just go to the movies whenever and start watching at whatever point you arrived. You'd then watch through the next showing and when you got to the same point, "this is where I came in" and leave.\\

I remember this as the standard as well, probably during the 50's and 60's. But now even the phrase "this is where I came in" has no doubt lost its meaning to most of the population.

The phrase does come to mind every once in a while when reading some of the threads on this forum. :p

marksman
08-15-2011, 04:16 AM
Something that is good is going to stand the test of time regardless of spoilers.

I think the only time spoilers really hurt something is if it is a surprise or big twist which ruining might take some of the enjoyment out of what is being watched.

Most of the stuff people post as spoilers are not likely to ruin anyone's enjoyment. That being said people want to control what they see before they watch something and fair enough.

I actually do not watch a lot of movies more than once, but I did watch one the other day I had not seen in a very long time. Even though I knew most of what happened, was still very enjoyable to watch. Again though, there are some shows and things I do not want to know ANYTHING about before watching them, so I just make sure I avoid anything or place to see spoilers. I feel ultimately it is my responsibility to control my environment if I want to put off seeing something and not be spoiled.

harrinpj
08-15-2011, 07:26 AM
My fondest memory of watching a movie was when I saw The Silence of the Lambs when I was 13 or so. I don't want to spoil it for anyone so...

The ending where Hannibal Lecter is in the ambulance wearing the face of one of the security guards and he sits up and pulls off the face.

That was probably the scariest and surprising thing I've ever seen. Was I stressed out at the time? Certainly. Would I have wanted to know the ending prior to watching it? No way. This movie watching experience wouldn't be my favorite if I'd known how it was going to end.

cheesesteak
08-15-2011, 08:14 AM
Seriously? When was this? I don't think it occured in my life time. And I'm 41 years old.
We definitely used to do this sometimes when I was in my early 20s. This would be the late 70s. It depended on the circumstances and if the theater ran the movie almost continually with no big break after the credits.

scooterboy
08-15-2011, 08:28 AM
Like I said, Psycho was an early "no spoilers" movie, but seeing a film only from the start didn't really catch on until the 1960s.

I probably went to the theater the first time in the late 60's, so it makes sense that I've never heard of this practice.

That said, it seems very strange to me that someone would think that it's normal to start watching a movie in the middle, then stick around to watch the first part. Strange on so many levels.

Even if movie start times weren't easily ascertained in advance, I would think that once they got there, they'd wait until the movie was about to start again before going in.

Did they also start reading a book in the middle, then finish by reading the beginning until they reached the chapter they started on? :confused:

I guess I don't understand a lot about how people thought in "the days of yore". It still astounds me that so many people thought that inhaling smoke into their lungs (causing a violent coughing fit at least the first few times) could possibly be harmless.

Steveknj
08-15-2011, 11:27 AM
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2270/why-are-they-called-trailers-if-theyre-shown-em-before-em-the-movie


Like I said, Psycho was an early "no spoilers" movie, but seeing a film only from the start didn't really catch on until the 1960s. Early on, of course, it was just a matter of logistics -- if you didn't get the newspaper and you didn't have a phone, there was no way to tell when the next showing was without actually going to the theater. And if you're there, why not just go inside?

I remember walking into matinee double-features as late as 1970, but I think that custom died off pretty shortly after that.

We used to do the same thing. I remember walking in on the middle of movies all the time....and sometimes we just kind of hung around and watch a movie again, or at least watched again to clarify something we might have missed.

TAsunder
08-15-2011, 12:47 PM
Not sure that Psycho was when it started to catch on; Witness for the Prosecution actually had a disclaimer in it asking you not to divulge the ending to other people who hadn't seen the film. That was in 1957.

SleepyBob
08-15-2011, 02:54 PM
There's a huge difference in spoilers and their impact, though. Everybody goes in to HP knowing that Harry beats Voldemort. And even knowing that person X gets killed or that the bad guys' getaway car isn't going to start, probably won't affect my enjoyment much either way.

Finding out who is getting kicked off of an episode of Hell's Kitchen or Design Star almost makes it not worth watching, since the guessing and anticipation while the episode unfolds is half the enjoyment of watching (IMO).

d-dub
08-15-2011, 04:02 PM
My high school GF was a speed reader. She could knock out a book in a few evenings. She told me she always read the last chapter first.

I remember thinking how odd that was and considered it a character flaw.



A few evenings? She was a remedial speed reader ;) A couple of my kids can knock out a novel in one sitting :)

john4200
08-15-2011, 04:48 PM
A couple of my kids can knock out a novel in one sitting :)

What, one takes the even pages and the other the odd pages? ;)

jsmeeker
08-15-2011, 06:05 PM
What about SPOLERS?

scooterboy
08-16-2011, 12:24 AM
What about SPOLERS?

They make a mean BBQ. :)

rifleman69
08-16-2011, 11:27 PM
I think that people are a bit too caught up on spoilers.. I've watched TV poker tournaments knowing who would win. (I don't remember at the moment, but at one point I already knew who was in the November Nine even though I am going to keep watching the WSOP episodes on Tuesdays.) Sure, I try not to be spoiled and try not to spoil others, but it doesn't completely ruin the thing.

This reminds me of my puzzlement about people who immediately delete recordings of a show that was cancelled. If they liked the show while it was in production, why not watch the rest? I do, EVEN if it ends up in a cliffhanger that's never resolved.

By the way:
He's his father.
He was dead the whole time.
They're both the same guy.
It's a sled.
They're in a forest in the modern time.


Empire Strikes Back, Sixth Sense, Fight Club, Citizen Kane, The Village

rifleman69
08-16-2011, 11:31 PM
Seriously? When was this? I don't think it occured in my life time. And I'm 41 years old.

Occurred during my lifetime and I'm 37. Went as a kid (maybe 5-6 years old) to a birthday party at a theater for Bambi or some similar kind of Disney movie. Movie was already playing and we sat in front. After the movie was over, it repeated (or another movie played, and then the first movie following) and we left when it got to where we originally came in.

Johnny Dancing
08-17-2011, 01:15 PM
A few evenings? She was a remedial speed reader ;) A couple of my kids can knock out a novel in one sitting :)

Wow. I wish I could do that. I am a 50 - 75 page per reading session. 900 page books scare me away. Since DVRs came along, there is always something to watch so reading sessions are hard to come by.

bareyb
08-17-2011, 05:47 PM
A lot of movies spoil themselves. You know the technique where they show you the end and you have to figure out how they go there. Momento was the ultimate.

I made the mistake of taking a writing class in School and it's basically ruined just about all TV dramas for me now. I don't watch a single cop show any more. I can figure out who done it in the first 10 minutes. ;)

DeDondeEs
08-17-2011, 07:10 PM
I made the mistake of taking a writing class in School and it's basically ruined just about all TV dramas for me now. I don't watch a single cop show any more. I can figure out who done it in the first 10 minutes. ;)

Yeah it's always the character they give only 30 seconds of screen time to in the first 10-15 minutes of the show.

eddyj
08-18-2011, 12:41 PM
A roller coaster is much more stressful than a carousel, but which one would you rather ride?

rondotcom
08-19-2011, 08:34 AM
...and flux capacitors...

All triggered by a Graviton pulse from a temporal distortion

Bierboy
08-19-2011, 08:42 AM
What about SPOLERS?

SPOLIERS?