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Will Cable TV ultimately migrate into being Internet TV?

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by nrnoble, Dec 5, 2013.

  1. Dec 5, 2013 #1 of 29
    nrnoble

    nrnoble Member

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    Given that TVs are becoming more and more Internet devices with apps, will cable TV as it exists today disappear and we'll just have internet Entertainment channels\Apps. And from each network app we will be able to do various different things such as watch live programming, or watch that networks's VOD programming and anything else they offer via the internet to internet devices.

    Not suggesting ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, ESPN, TNT, CNN, etc will go away, rather they will become icons\apps we can select and watch, rather than having channel numbers.

    I've wondered why the networks or local TV stations don't offer live streaming directly from their websites to phones, tablets, and internet enable TVs. I suppose it has to do with the rights\restrictions they have to distribute programming.
     
  2. Dec 5, 2013 #2 of 29
    HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    I think that's going to happen sooner rather than later and it makes me question my expensive TiVo purchases. Roku is really making some inroads.
     
  3. Dec 5, 2013 #3 of 29
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    There are still a bunch of regulations and old school business deal in place that makes that a lot harder then it sounds. We're probably still a couple decades away from a pure VOD style TV system.
     
  4. Dec 5, 2013 #4 of 29
    mr.unnatural

    mr.unnatural Active Member

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    I don't think the current infrastructure could handle it if every household tried to stream HD content simultaneously. While I definitely see it taking over at some point as a primary source for TV programming, there are still a lot of people using DTV converters for their old analog TVs. Older trechnology would have to coexist with us for quite some time before it takes over completely.

    The one huge caveat I see is by having every communication source linked to your home via a single cable or optical network, it creates a huge weak link. With the exception of cell phones and satellites, every other form of communication could be severed if your internet goes down.
     
  5. Dec 5, 2013 #5 of 29
    slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    But do you really want to be forced to watch commercials in unskippable streams? Because that's going to be what they want in exchange for unlimited VOD of all channels/shows.

    There will be a need for a good DVR in this house for the forseeable future, because I want to watch what I want when I want and how I want. VOD might solve the what and when, but it might not solve the how. Not to mention that you'll then be subject to the whims of what they want to make available (i.e. limited viewing windows).
     
  6. Dec 5, 2013 #6 of 29
    jimmypowder

    jimmypowder New Member

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    Man, i hope its not a couple of decades away.

    Comcast,Time Warner will of course fight this tooth and nail and when it happens your 50 /month internet bill will rise to 200/month with overage charges on data! LOL.
     
  7. Dec 5, 2013 #7 of 29
    dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    I don't see this as a killer issue. After all, just 30 or so years ago, and for decades before that, the POTS was the single communications link. Just means you have to keep it going. Same kind of argument applies to electric delivery, water, gas and sewer. Actually, if we deemed it important enough, providing redundancy in Internet service infrastructure probably is much easier and cheaper to do than for those other services.

    I'm also not worried about overall bandwidth. Fiber could do it even with today's technology.

    My main concern is I may not live long enough to see it happen. ;)
     
  8. Dec 5, 2013 #8 of 29
    HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    Totally disagree. Now way it's going to be "a couple decades away"!
     
  9. Dec 5, 2013 #9 of 29
    HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    There will be solutions for that, legit or hacker.
     
  10. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    There are already solutions for that now (i.e., bittorrent and Usenet), so what's the advantage here?

    People that wish for the all-streaming future better understand that it's going to come with tradeoffs just like anything else. They're not going to throw all that video out there subject to consuming whichever way you feel like, at least not without a (possibly substantial) cost.
     
  11. javabird

    javabird Active Member

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    That's the way it used to be when analog TV was over-the-air, and probably the main reason the home VCR, and eventually the TiVo, became popular.
     
  12. zalusky

    zalusky Active Member TCF Club

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    We need bandwidth competition. Perhaps local Wifi might eventually provide something.
    Uverse is pretty limited as a result cable controls the pipe.
     
  13. NYHeel

    NYHeel Active Member

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    I hope it doesn't happen for a long time. I like my TV the way it is now. I can watch live, later at home, or live and later on the go. And most importantly, I can skip commercials.

    In an all streaming world I'm not going to be able to skip commercials or save seasons of shows. I would imagine that NBC won't offer prior year's episodes of their shows for free on their app. Now I can store prior year's episodes very easily on my DVR or offload to my PC for storage if I'm low on space.

    I really think all streaming is going to be really bad.
     
  14. HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    PlayOn/PlayLater already do. Not elegant or up to TiVo's standards or even a cable co dvr, but as with everything it's just a matter of time.

    I'm not saying that's what I really want, I was just replying to the OP's initial question.
     
  15. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I don't know, there are just so many hands in the cookie jar in this industry I can't see how it's all going to be worked out any sooner then that. Huge tech companies like Google and Intel have tried to break into the industry and failed.

    And even if it does somehow happen I agree with the others that it'll be chalk full of restrictions, like forced commercials and limited viewing windows, so some sort of DVR will still be required to maintain our current experience.
     
  16. nrnoble

    nrnoble Member

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    I'm actually surprised that networks have not demanded that DVRs enforce no-skip rules into the digital data stream and no-copy. I can't see how it benefits any commerical network to allow the audience to FF\skip past the commericials, and also allow commercials to be easily edited out for same day world wide distribution via bittorrent. I use VideoReDo weekly, I'm just puzzled that the whole copy\edit process is not blocked via the copy\encryption restrictions that can be turned on so that their content can't be transferred off the DVR.

    I've noticed that HBO and other pay networks block the ability to transfer their programming to other devices (ie computers or other DVRs).
     
  17. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    They tried to do that a few years back. But some advocate groups petitioned the FCC and convinced them to not allow it. Broadcast channels use public airwaves and as such are not allowed to impose any restrictions on their content. Now cable on the other hand can protect everything if they want. However they have to walk a fine line between what their customers want and what the content providers want.

    Edit: Just looked it up. It was called the "broadcast flag" and was similar to the CCI byte used for cable but was for OTA broadcasts. And it looks like the advocate group I was talking about had to actually sue the FCC to get them to overturn the broadcast flag rules, not just petition them. The court ruled in their favor and stated that the FCC had overstepped their authority by forcing CE manufacturers to adhere to the broadcast flag rules....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadcast_flag
     
  18. christheman

    christheman New Member

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    I'm not looking forward to any of that crap. Just enjoying what I have for the time being...
     
  19. mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    I'm all for it *IF* there is a way to get everything without commercials, and there IS *ALSO* a way to still optionally record things for keeps (e.g. I keep musical performances on talk shows).

    But mostly, if I didn't have to deal with DVRs/Tivos and could get EVERYTHING without commercials.. great!

    I don't think that world will come for a VERY VERY long time. Eventually, yes likely.. (yes, I expect the commercial free version to cost a lot more than the commercial filled version.)
     
  20. slowbiscuit

    slowbiscuit FUBAR

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    There will always be a way to get everything you want without commercials, but it will likely not be legit.
     

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