1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Why I bought a Roamio and why it was a mistake

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by c133roamioerrors, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

    19,771
    132
    Jan 31, 2002
    Northern...
    or add more Access Points to setup the WiFi network properly with proper coverage, and the Roamio will have a solid wireless signal.

    My Roamio Basic is rock solid on wireless. But my signal strength is between 90% and 100% over 5Ghz wireless N.
     
  2. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

    5,804
    82
    Oct 30, 2003
    Hartford-...
    Yeah, the TiVo is a very poor application for wireless, since better alternatives exist.
     
  3. kucharsk

    kucharsk Member

    146
    0
    Feb 2, 2007
    My Roamio actually does better with its internal Wi-Fi connection than my S3 did with the USB add-on.

    The only issue is there's a bug in the DHCP implementation on the Roamio that prevents it working with many routers. :(
     
  4. eboydog

    eboydog Just TiVo'ing.....

    904
    0
    Mar 23, 2006
    Every wireless network is different and Tivo needs to clarify their marketing info as I believe they only intended the wifi in the Roamio 's to be for downloading service data and guide info yet it appears they rushed to market with it without working out the wifi issues.

    The residential Wifi products are flaky to begin with, my Samsung tablet hates my wifi, it drops off and sometime never can find my home wireless while my Asus notebook never has a problem then, my wife's Ipad could never attach to my old dlink wifi router and I had to ditch it and buy a new wifi router.

    The problem with device supporting wifi is that there simply to many types out there, not to mention the increase in their use, I can pickup over 13 wifi networks at my house (ondly 2 are mine!) which the majority are wireless G, right now the best option is to use wireless N as that's used less and uses a different frequency which is less susceptible for interference.
     
  5. Grakthis

    Grakthis New Member

    828
    0
    Oct 4, 2006
    I'm increasingly of the belief that wired ethernet is becoming like phone and power and co-ax. It is a requirement for every house. Wireless bands are getting overcrowded, bandwidth usage is going up, we're sending more and more things across ethernet. I wired my house before I moved in... I'm in the process of selling it, and I plan to do the same thing in the next house.

    It is simply a requirement to be happy with technology these days. More and more things are going to run on Cat6.

    I know no one wants to hear 'spend a few G and wire your house up' but I promise, if you just suck it up and do it, you'll enjoy never having to think about these kinds of things for the entire rest of the time you live there.
     
  6. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

    39,241
    835
    Apr 17, 2000
    Nevada
    A few G! Wow. I was thinking about wiring my house for Cat6 and it's only going to cost me about $200 and a Saturday. (1000' of cable, jacks, tools, and time) Why are you spending a few G?
     
  7. wkearney99

    wkearney99 Bill Kearney

    1,922
    15
    Dec 5, 2003
    Bethesda,...
    If you're paying someone else to do the work, and it's large house, it could well run into several thousand to completely wire it up (and terminate both ends of the cabling). I ran all the low voltage wire in our new house after getting a couple of estimates that ran upwards of $16k. Granted, this was for a ton of ethernet, speakers, alarm and automation wiring. I ran it myself for around $1k in materials (patch panels, wall plates and jacks add up). But I won't kid you about the amount of work... and I didn't terminate all the wiring in the rooms.

    But to run wiring for 4 or 5 locations shouldn't exceed $1k, including everything but the actual network equipment.
     
  8. mburnno

    mburnno Member

    133
    0
    Oct 1, 2003
    The OP shouldn't have to use MOCA to get his box to work properly. I am not trying to pick a fight with anyone but why should the end user have to go out and spend more money just to get a Roamio box to work correctly. When you call Tivo support and you tell them you are having connection problems the first thing out of the their mouth is ..... "you can setup a MOCA connection" or are you using a switch. unacceptable !!!
     
  9. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

    39,241
    835
    Apr 17, 2000
    Nevada
    Wifi is unreliable. I actually wonder why they even included it in the box. I thought it was going to be bridgeable, meaning it would be used for the internet leg while MoCa would be used for all TiVo to Mini communication. But apparently that's not even possible. I think they may have included it because it was "free" with the RF chip they're using for the new remote or because it was required by one of their MSO partners.

    As to why you should have to spend money to get it to work properly.... You're spending $400-$600 on a TiVo, plus service, and you're worried about spending $50 on a MoCa adapter? Even if you could get wifi to work it would still have all the inherent problems that come along with using wifi, so MoCa is a better choice anyway.
     
  10. Bigg

    Bigg Cord Cutter

    5,804
    82
    Oct 30, 2003
    Hartford-...
    If you're building new or remodeling, it's an obvious thing to do. If you have a way of dropping wires from an attic or going up from the basement with a minimally invasive procedure, then it makes sense, and it's not that hard to do. However, there are many cases where it's either really hard to run the wires, or you're renting. In this case, I'd say MoCA is a really good option, as it avoids the whole wireless thing, although Wireless AC in the 5ghz band is making a good showing, and that band isn't absurdly overcrowded like the 2.4ghz band is.

    Also, phone lines? Who runs those anymore? Even if you want to hold on to a home phone just a little longer, since everything is going cell-only, Ooma and a modern DECT 6 phone doesn't require any wiring in the first place. Where 10 years ago, the prudent thing to do was 2x RG-6, and 3x CAT-5e with one terminated for two phone lines, and two for Ethernet, I'd argue today that 2x RG-6QS and 2x CAT-6 is the way to go, and wire all the CAT as Ethernet/HDBaseT. If you really, really want to wire phone lines in, wire a 3rd CAT-5e or 6 cable in, and terminate both ends as 8p8c, so that they can be used for something more useful than a phone line.
     

Share This Page