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WD Drive Options

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by Ollie_3151, May 26, 2012.

  1. A J Ricaud

    A J Ricaud New Member

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    Hacienda...
    I stand corrected. I meant "copying", not encryption. I think that FiOS is about the only one around here that doesn't set the flag--yet.
     
  2. A J Ricaud

    A J Ricaud New Member

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    Hacienda...
    I'm not sure what you mean, but if you are referring to "Tivo Desktop", it will not let you copy recordings to a PC if they are copy protected.
     
  3. farmermac

    farmermac Recorder of shows

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    Jan 31, 2012
    oh. I've never run into that yet.. My cable provider must not copy protect anything.
     
  4. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    "My what big teeth you have, grandmother" said Little Red Riding Hood. :D (She didn't realize she was confronting a wolf -- yet!)
     
  5. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    Any more success (or failure) stories with this drive?

    It appears Intellipark is disabled by default, which would make things simple.
    But it does not appear as a recommended drive in the FAQ.

    Worse yet, there is this thread:
    http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?t=470061
    Looks discouraging...

    But then again, there is this:

    http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?p=9356638&highlight=WD10EURX#post9356638

    So, is it worth trying?
     
  6. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    If you already own one of that model drive, perhaps it would be better used in a PC somewhere.

    Wait for newegg and Amazon to drop the price of a WD20EURS to $100 and grab one of those.
     
  7. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    Portland,...
    Thanks for the suggestion.

    No, I have not bought it yet. I have Tivo HD XL. The way I use Tivo, even the 1TB is MASSIVE overkill. My main (only) consideration is ease of replacement and reliability, not capacity. ***

    But, if the WD20EURS is more likely to work than WD10EURX (especially if I don't have to mess with the Intellipark bit), then I guess I'd do it, it's now $108 as opposed to $84 for the 1TB.

    EDIT: *** Actually, I tell a lie. My main consideration is drive quietness, as the unit is in my audiophile listening room.
     
  8. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    Recently got one from Amazon for $108, with no shipping cost and no tax. It came in one day with Amazon Prime. AND it was packed in the original WD package with sealed anti-static bag and plastic end-cap spacers, i.e., the best. Waiting for $100 or a little less at another vendor doesn't seem worth it.
     
  9. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    Portland,...
    I agree. Plus, I really can't wait any more. The audio/video glitches are getting really bad.

    Have you installed it yet? Using WinMFS or something else? Any snags?
     
  10. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Amazon's price tends to bounce around, but if newegg goes to $100, they're pretty quick to price match (and pretty quick to go back up as soon as newegg's sale is over).
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    If you have a TCD658000, and it's running version 11.0k of the TiVo software, then you should be able to hook up both drives (to a non-GigaByte brand motherboard), open WinMFS, copy the stock drive to the EURS with mfscopy, increasing the swap partition size if you want to, and then click on mfsadd, and it'll fill the rest of that 2TB without any problem.

    And you can supersize if you want.
     
  12. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    I was hoping to do this via a USB3.0->SATA adapter without having to hook it to the motherboard. I don't really care about the saved recordings. BTW, can't you do a full (non-truncated) backup from the original drive to the PC drive, then mount the replacement drive and restore the backup? I have 1.5TB free on the PC internal drive.

    I may be off base, but this is a concern I have about using the 2TB: The FAQ states that only non-expanded image can be used for transfer to the new 2TB drive. So, say I transfer it, and 3 years from now the new 2TB drive also starts to sputter and I need to do another transfer. Would I be able to transfer the new (expanded) drive to yet another drive?

    This is really a minefield...
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    So far the biggest drive that a TiVo will even boot with, regardless of how much of it is actually used or how big its partition map thinks it is, is 2TB.

    I'm not absolutely certain if that's a hardware, i.e., motherboard, issue, or just that the Linux kernel the TiVo software uses can only count that high, but the hardware's not going to change and the software's not going to undergo as radical a re-write as would be needed to change the kernel that much, at least not on S3s and older for sure, and probably not on S4s.

    So don't expect to ever use anything bigger than a 2TB in your S3.

    So all you would be able to do is use one of the Linux command line utilities* to "Xerox" that 2TB to another 2TB, or restore a truncated backup (all settings, but no recordings) to a new 2TB and then expand.

    In theory you could, if your Linux-Fu is strong, do a compressed backup of the 658's entire 1TB drive, recordings and all, but it wouldn't be compressed much.

    You can do a WinMFS copy from the 1TB to the 2TB via USB adapter, but of course you'll need 2 of them and 2 available USB ports on the PC.

    To do it with only one, and to backup the entire 1TB drive, including recordings, and then restore that to a 2TB before expanding, you would have to use the MFS Live bootable cd and do it on the command line, and have lots of space on your PC's hard drive.

    That's in theory. I can't swear that it'll handle a file that large.

    You should go to mfslive.org and do lots and lots of reading and then read it all again.

    (MFS Live and the old MFS Tools backups are not interchangeable with WinMFS backups--neither can understand the other)

    If you don't need to save your recordings (or if you can copy them all off to PC using TiVo Desktop or pyTiVo or something), then you can do it all with WinMFS and one adapter by doing a truncated backup of the 1TB to some space (under 1GB) on your PC's hard drive, and then swapping out the 1TB and swapping in the 2TB and restoring the backup, which will fill 1TB of the 2TB, and then using mfsadd to expand into the rest of the 2TB.

    *The MFS Live cd, v1.4, has both

    dd

    and

    dd_rescue

    either of which will do a byte for byte "Xerox" of one drive to another of equal or greater size.

    I prefer

    dd_rescue

    because you can get it to show you what it's doing and it has options that could help copy from a failing drive where the more primitive

    dd

    would fail.


    There's also

    ddrescue

    which is similar to dd_rescue and available on other bootable Linux based cds.
     
  14. dlfl

    dlfl Cranky old novice

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    I haven't installed it yet. I have done the WD Diagnostics extended test, which is recommended on any drive before putting it in a TiVo.

    I am planning to use WinMFS but what's possible and what's best depends on several factors. Some upgrades can't be done with just WinMFS and sometimes another approach is better even if WinMFS could be used. Read the last few pages of the sticky thread on Drive expansion, then post your specific situation to get more specific advice.
     
  15. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    Thanks guys for the replies.

    I think I should have been more clear about my situation:

    Yes, I have TiVo HD XL TCD 658000 with lifetime, over 3 years old, original drive. The video dropouts and audio screeches have been getting more and more frequent, now are untenable. I use the unit very sparingly, I don't use Tivo recommendations, only record a few programs a week for time shifting, so increasing the size of the drive is of no benefit to me.

    I just need to replace the drive with a drive that is just as quiet as the original, with minimum fuss and expense. I don't care about losing recordings, season passes or other settings. I currently have no drive, no USB->SATA adapter, no spare SATA cables. I have no Linux experience, but fair amount of PC/Windows experience. I would, however, prefer not to have to open and connect anything to my PC motherboard, and would like to install as few utilities on my PC as possible.

    Option A: Buy a 1TB from dvrstore.com already set up. This would work for me, provided dvrstore.com is reputable and sells new, not refurb drives.

    Option B: Take a risk on the WD10EURX. If it goes well, it would be the cheapest option even with buying a USB->SATA adapter. Plus, I could buy another drive, set it up now and keep it in reserve for the next failure. It is possible that suitable replacement drives will be even harder to get in the future.

    Option C: Get the WD20EURS, which hopefully would work more likely than option B. I'd also have to buy at least a USB->SATA adapter, which means this option is almost as expensive as Option A, but with much more hassle.

    If you were me, which one would you choose?
     
  16. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Option C:

    3 year warranty, better GB/$ ratio and it's specifically designed to be an A/V drive and a bunch of us are running them in S3s and S4s successfully.

    But as with any drive from any manufacturer purchased from anywhere, run the manufacturer's diagnostics long test before putting the drive into service.
     
  17. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    Understood. The previous reports of success is what will probably sway me towards it, because the higher price & capacity, even with the better GB/$, is a negative for me.

    The WD10EURX, however, also has 3 year warranty and is specifically designed to be an A/V drive. The only difference on the spec sheet besides capacity is slightly bigger power consumption for the WD10EURX.

    http://www.wdc.com/wdproducts/library/SpecSheet/ENG/2879-701250.pdf
     
  18. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Have you found any reports of anyone using the WD20EURS and having it not succeed other than a few the other day where running the long test revealed that the drives were actually faulty out of the box?
     
  19. oregonalex

    oregonalex New Member

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    No, it seems to work reliably for everyone, that's why I'm leaning towards it, even though it is more money (as I said, I don't care about the larger capacity). I have found at least three reports of success and two reports of non-success with WD10EURX. It bugs me a bit - the drives should both work - they are both A/V drives from the same family. Maybe the reason is that knowledgeable people pick the WD20EURS to begin with, so the success rate is higher. There is actually also a WD10EUCX with a smaller cache (which does not matter in Tivo), which should also work. Even cheaper.
     
  20. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    semi-coastal NC
    The ones that end in X are newer models than the ones that end in S.

    Considering that the S3 TiVos themselves are older tech, the older drive may be more compatible.

    The EURS doesn't have to autonegotiate down to 3Gb/s, it's already there, so that's one thing fewer to go wrong.
     

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