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VHS to Premiere?

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by skruggie, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. skruggie

    skruggie New Member

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    Jun 28, 2002
    I was wondering if its possible to copy the contents of a vhs tape to tivo and then transfer that recording to my mac?

    How painless or not painless of a procedure might this be? The big bonus for me that I could see is archiving many tapes at a time, and then doing just letting it run with the computer so that I don't have to babysit footage, like I was doing when I tried this project a long time ago with my vcr hooked up directly to my computer.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated.
     
  2. Tony Chick

    Tony Chick New Member

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    Jun 20, 2002
    Sherman...
    There are no video inputs on the Premiere, you'd have to use the coax RF out on the VCR connected to the Antenna input on the Premiere (2-tuner only) and do a manual record from Channel 3 or whatever channel the VCR is set for. I suspect the result will be pretty poor quality. You'd do better with a video-to-USB converter and import directly into the Mac
     
  3. poppagene

    poppagene User

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    Dec 29, 2001
    Is the premiere capable of receiving NTSC channel 3? I thought it only had an ATSC tuner.

    Edit. Premiere and Premiere XL have both ATSC and ATSC tuners
     
  4. Tony Chick

    Tony Chick New Member

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    Jun 20, 2002
    Sherman...
    You are right, its ATSC only. The OP is SOL as far as using a Premiere:)
    A Video-to USB 2.0 converter is the way to go. They are relatively cheap and you get the video into a PC/Mac/Mobile friendly format rather than dealing with MPEG-2
     
  5. Arcady

    Arcady Stargate Fan

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    Oct 14, 2004
    Philadelphia...
    A two-tuner Premiere can still receive NTSC.

    I capture video from VHS and other analog sources on my Mac. I use a box that connects via firewire. It's a Canopus ADVC-100. It seems to keep audio and video synced much better than the USB products I have tried.
     
  6. skruggie

    skruggie New Member

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    Jun 28, 2002
    OK thanks it was an interesting idea - I have used a Canopus in the past, but converting to DV to mpeg via imovie is utterly painful. The process isn't worth the amount of time it takes to encode for archiving purposes, with the amount of tapes that I have.
     
  7. Arcady

    Arcady Stargate Fan

    3,960
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    Oct 14, 2004
    Philadelphia...
    Are these home movies or something?

    How about a VHS/DVD Recorder combo deck?
     
  8. skruggie

    skruggie New Member

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    Jun 28, 2002
    no - its a daily soap opera that I kept every episode of for about 20 years.

    No judgements please:) I am not willing to give up the tapes, but the project that I have started and stopped many times over the past several years is too overwhelming and time consuming in order to get an output of decent quality that at least matches the source.

    So, on vhs apparently they stay.
     
  9. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Nevada
    Converting VHS to digital is always going to be time consuming because it has to be done in realtime. So if you have 20 years worth of recordings, assuming 5 episodes a week, 1 hour per episode that's 5200 hours of capture time. Capturing 24 hours a day that would take roughly 217 days to complete. Not to mention that even at a nominal MPEG-2 bitrate of 2.5Mbps it would require almost 6TB of storage space to hold all of it.

    Dan
     
  10. skruggie

    skruggie New Member

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    Jun 28, 2002
    It's not the storage space that concerns me - its the time. And hence why I started and stopped this project many times over. I've had to come to the conclusion that it's just not going to happen,
     
  11. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Nevada
    If you treated it like a full time job and did it 8 hours a day it would take you roughly 2 years to complete. You have to ask yourself... is it really worth it?

    Dan
     
  12. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Just out of curiousity, which soap?
     
  13. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    Do you already own the Premiere, or is your question related to what kind of TiVo to get?

    A Series 2 has RCA inputs and can be lied to about having a satellite receiver or cable box hooked up to them (when it's actually your VCR), and you can copy the recordings from the S2 to a computer.
     
  14. mulscully

    mulscully Member

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    May 31, 2003
    Malvern, Pa
    I recently converted a bunch of VHS tapes to files for use in pyTivo (no where near 20 years worth) but was able to do each 6 hour tape with about 15 Min worth of work on my part a day.

    If interested, here is how..
    Used a capture program and a analog to digital converter for the computer. before I went to work I would start the tape and recording. There was a timer on the capture program so I could set it to shut off in 6.5 hours. then when I came home from work, loaded the file into Video Redo and segmented it down to individual shows. and repeated.. Now I did 20 tapes and was done in 20 days, but you could also expand this and run the conversions over night also and then segment 2 files when you get home from work...
     
  15. evanborkow

    evanborkow Member

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    Mar 17, 2008
    Or pay someone.
     
  16. lillevig

    lillevig Cold in East Iowa

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    Marion, Iowa
    One cheap way would be to just buy a composite/S-video input to USB directly into the PC. Not sure if they work on Macs but I've used one on WIndows. The video quality was not that great but probably good enough for tapes you recorded yourself vs commercial tapes. The best way I've found is to use an older Tivo that has the composite inputs. You can pick up an S2 box with lifetime for less than $100 and record to your heart's delight. The downside is the name of the recording. It will take on the name of whatever was supposed to be on the channel you picked for the recording. You can rename it once it's on the PC but that name will not transfer if you decide to put it back on the Tivo. I ran into that when I copied some of my wife's exercise tapes to a Tivo. I got around that by transferring to my PC using kmttg and decrypting it (with the kmttg option) to a "normal" mpeg2 file. I could then rename the file and transfer it back to the Tivo with the new name using pyTivo.
     

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