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Upgraded HD in Tivo HD back in the S03 error loop. HELP!

Discussion in 'TiVo Upgrade Center' started by StirHouse, Jun 23, 2014.

  1. L David Matheny

    L David Matheny Active Member

    1,589
    2
    Jan 29, 2011
    SE Ohio
    Maybe some lubricants could harden enough to cause jamming, but if there's dust inside your hard disk drive, you've got big problems.
     
  2. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Feb 5, 2011
    Cox Cable...
    Yeah. That's for sure. A quick test to see if the internal dust (particulate) filters are full is to peel up the adhesive-backed silver inspection port covers/labels and see if the adhesive exposed to the inside of the drive has any particulates in/on it. Done VERY carefully, you can know if your drive is at imminent failure state, without voiding any warranty that may be intact.

    Those filters are micron, or better, grade. If dust makes it onto the adhesive inspection port covers, that almost certainly means the filters are full, and your data is literally flying around in the internal airflow (being lost a speck at a time).

    EDIT/ADD: I see your post clocked in a minute after mine, saying mostly the same thing about dust. I'd be interested any perspectives you have on anything else I posted. I'm thinking you might overlook the post due to the timing.
     
  3. lessd

    lessd Active Member

    7,697
    5
    Jan 23, 2005
    CT
    I only used dust because that the only thing I thought of but your lubricants problem if true may make more sense, I don't know I just do my 6 month cold boot and all works for me.
    The reason there is no good answer is because if you tested a batch of drives for extended life over 5 years you may get answers about the best drive that you purchased 5 years ago, but today the drives would different, there no way I know of doing a torture test on a hard drive so that 1 year of operation can be reduced to say one day.
     
  4. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

    3,554
    0
    Feb 5, 2011
    Cox Cable...
    Another thing I fully agree with, and am glad you brought it up...

    I'm sure some of the great minds on here could make a program that simulates TiVo disk writes, with user-specified bitrates for SD/HD, and number of streams being processed by the drive (tuner number emulation). Even SATA-1 (150MB/s) boards and and old processor could simulate the TiVo host interface. That just leaves people willing to run one or more test rigs and drives for the test under as much load as it will take, then see how long each drive holds-up. Emulating the databases and non-AV data would have to likely be left out.

    I figure a TiVo would be a good device to test the longevity of SSDs, just requiring knowing the bitrate, and calculating computer use bitrates to multiply the failure time by, to get a rough guesstimate.

    Back to platter drives: Seagate drives have "total LBAs written" and "total LBAs read" in the extended SMART profiles, making it easy to know how many times the whole drive has been rewritten over a period of time.

    I know there's a lot of factors missing and nothing concrete can be determined. It just sounds possible, and something I'd like to see tried (or do myself, if I had all the hardware, plus the coding skills).
     

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