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TV Is Dying, And Here Are The Stats That Prove It

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Johncv, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. pdhenry

    pdhenry Ladies like it, too.

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    PA
    You don't need the higher tier speeds. I have "Performance" (recently upgraded to 25 Mbps) and it's more than I need; 12 Mbps was fine in the past. That plus limited basic and HBO is around $68; when I had everything plus HBO it was over $150. I agree that "Starter" level Internet speed (3 Mbps, IIRC) might not be adequate.
     
  2. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

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    Mar 10, 2003
    New Jersey
    Exactly. While it's a lot harder to get those in 18-49 range, simply they aren't watching as much TV and in many cases, they aren't watching traditional network TV at all (especially in the 18-30 range.) I read an interesting article on the decline of "catch phrases" in advertising and in interviews, under 25s are seriously cutting the cord from traditional TV. In one interview, they spoke to young 20s woman who talked about how she and her friends don't watch much TV at all, and when they are watching something, they are watching, Neflix or Amazon video or something else streaming. They almost NEVER watch commercials. So are the advertisers chasing something that will never come there way? Are they spending a LOT of money trying to perk the interest of someone who's not remotely interested or is simply tuning out? Would it be better to direct that money to online advertising? And, with the advent of the DVR, is traditional advertising, dying if not completely dead? I really think the age brackets probably need better refinement (and maybe when the number come in they ARE looking at this closer than simply 18-49 only matters). As mentioned, it's cheaper to reach those above 50 during the day, but are over 50s really home during the day anymore than 18-49s? Certainly over 65s probably are, but 50-65? I doubt it. They work too, and the work force could be getting older. And under 30s? Are they hard to reach or impossible to reach? I'm thinking the sweet spot for advertisers these days are probably 30-60, not 18-49 on traditional TV.
     
  3. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

    40,591
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    Mar 10, 2003
    New Jersey
    I'm getting about 17 mbbs down now on my lower tier Optimum Online cable broadband. I can't remember the last time I had a glitch streaming anything, either via Roku or my Sony BluRay player, or wherever. Those days are in the past. As long as the source has decent throughput (i.e. Netflix or Amazon or wherever the content is coming from) there, no glitches. Smooth as silk. I get more glitches streaming through devices that are not dedicated for streaming, such as through my iPad or phone (which is LTE Verizon, or WiFi). But even that is a LOT better than it used to be. I think it is now a viable option to cut the cord if the content / price is not acceptable via your content provider. For me, if it weren't for sports, I'd definitely consider it.
     

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