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TivoHD & Series3 MRV/TTG/TTCB: FAQ + Discussion

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by bkdtv, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Oct 26, 2007 #1 of 366
    bkdtv

    bkdtv New Member

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    Jan 9, 2003
    DC Metro Area
    This thread is outdated. See the current version stickied at the top of the forum:

    TivoHD FAQ: Overview, Using TiVo, Tips, and Issues


    Disclaimer: TiVo had no involvement with this FAQ.

    This FAQ is divided into three sections:

    1. MRV (TiVo -> TiVo)
    2. TiVoToGo (TiVo -> Computer)
    3. TiVoToComeBack (Computer -> TiVo).
    The contents of this FAQ were compiled from member posts to this forum. It is a work in progress; if there is a question you feel should be added, or there is an answer that should be expanded or clarified, please post.

    Note this FAQ is not intended as a substitute for TiVo Home Media Features & TiVoToGo forum. It is meant to (1) answer common questions and (2) address issues specific to the Series3 and TivoHD.

    Last Updated: Jan/29/2009.


    I. MRV (TiVo -> TiVo)


    1. What is MRV?

      Multi-room viewing (MRV) allows any TiVo in your home to view the recordings on any other TiVo in your home.

      The Now Playing screen on each TiVo displays a separate folder for every other TiVo in your home. Each of these folders contains a list of all non-copy-protected recordings on that TiVo. Selecting a program on another TiVo copies the recording from that box. You can watch recordings as they transfer. You can also pause a recording in one room and resume it in another.


    2. What do I need to use it?

      You need any two (or more) Series2, Series3, or TiVoHD DVRs running the latest software on the same billing account and the same home network.


    3. How do I enable MRV?

      TiVo enables MRV on all new TiVos by default. However, it may take 48 hours before a new TiVo authorized for MRV by TiVo's servers.

      To check whether MRV is enabled on your TiVo, you can login to Manage My Account @ TiVo.com and verify the box for "Enable Video Downloads" is checked on your TiVo DVRs.

      Each TiVo will display the correct DVR name and "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo on the System Information screen once it is authorized. Screenshot.


    4. How do I know what recordings I can watch with MRV on the TivoHD or Series3?

      You can watch any recording stored on another TiVo so long as it is not copy protected (CCI 0x02). You will not be given the option to transfer copy-protected programs.

      You can see whether a recording is copy-protected by selecting the program on your TiVo, and hitting the Info button. If the file is copy protected, the TiVo will list those copy restrictions. You may need to page down (channel -) on the Info screen to see this information.

      Note it was not TiVo's choice to prohibit transfer of copy-protected programs. Cable Labs prohibits the transfer of copy-protected programs from one DVR to another. To provide MRV on copy-protected programs, TiVo would have to add support for streaming without copying. Streaming represents a problem, because most customers network their TiVos using the 802.11g adapter, and 802.11g is often insufficient to sustain high-definition streaming with interference from other devices and adjacent networks.


    5. Can I transfer HD recordings between the TiVoHD and Series3?

      Yes, you can transfer non-copy-protected SD and HD recordings between the TiVoHD and Series3.


    6. Are high-definition recordings downconverted during transfer?

      No. Recordings transferred with MRV are 100% identical to the original. There is no downconversion or quality degradation of any kind.


    7. Can I transfer recordings from HD channels to the Series2?

      No. The Series2 cannot play recordings from HD channels, and the TiVoHD and Series3 cannot convert high-definition recordings to standard definition.


    8. Can I transfer SD recordings from the TiVoHD and Series3 to a Series2? And SD recordings from the Series2 to the TiVoHD and Series3?

      Yes to both. That said, both must be running the latest software. If you just got your TiVo, then it will have an older version of the software. It usually takes a few days for a new TiVo to download the latest software, but it can take as long as a week.

      Some SD recordings on the Series2 may need to be converted to a compatible format before they will transfer to the Series3 and TivoHD. The TiVo Series2 will do that automatically, but it tends to slow transfer times.


    9. Can I watch recordings as they transfer, or do I have to wait until the transfer is complete?

      With MRV, you can watch the recordings as they transfer. You do not have to wait until the transfer is complete.

      With TiVoHD and TiVo Series3 DVRs on a 100Mbps wired, 100Mbps coax (MoCA), and 802.1n wireless networks, all SD and HD recordings should transfer fast enough to allow for immediate, uninterrupted viewing without delay.

      On traditional 802.11g wireless networks, you may need wait a bit before you can watch some HD recordings from start to finish without interruption. Be aware that wireless networks are subject to interference from other devices and adjacent networks, and this interference can negatively impact MRV performance.


    10. Can I pause a recording in one room and resume it in another?

      Yes. With MRV, you can pause a recording in one room and then resume it in another.


    11. Help! My TiVos don't see each other! (Or I get unknown format error.)

      As noted in FAQ #1, it may take 48 hours before a new TiVo is authorized for MRV by TiVo's servers.

      To check whether MRV is enabled on your TiVo, you can login to Manage My Account @ TiVo.com and verify the box for "Enable Video Downloads" is checked on your TiVo DVRs.

      You can confirm whether your TiVo is authorized and ready for MRV by checking the System Information screen. The System Information screen should show the correct name of your TiVo, and it should indicate "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo (screenshot). If you don't see both, then your DVR is not yet authorized and ready for MRV.

      If your System Information screen doesn't indicate "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo, and you've had your TiVo up and running for at least 24 hours, then youc an try the following:

      1. On each TiVo, force a connection to the TiVo service using Settings -> Phone & Network.

      2. Reboot each TiVo after the connection is complete.


    12. Help! Many of my channels are copy-protected and will not work with MRV.

      Few cable companies apply widespread copy protection, except to premium cable channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. If your provider is among those that does copy-protect most digital cable channels, there is not much you can do about that.

      FCC mandate permits cable companies to apply copy protection (CCI 0x02) -- preventing use of TTG and MRV -- on any channel outside of the limited basic tier. This is typically an independent decision by the cable company, but it can also be done at the request of the content provider, some of whom now want copy protection as part of the contract renewal for their channel(s).

      Cable companies are not permitted to copy-protect local channels. If you are not able to use TTG (or MRV) with a recording from a local channel, you should contact your cable provider to have them correct the problem. Tell them they are using a CCI value of 0x02 on their local channels that prevents copying, in violation of federal law.


    13. Will MRV ever allow viewing of copy-protected recordings on other boxes?

      TiVo's current implementation of MRV copies recordings from one box to another. The CableLabs DFAST licensing agreement -- which every CableCard device manufacturer must adhere to -- does not allow protected recordings to be copied elsewhere. It does allow copy-protected recordings to be streamed from one device to another.

      A future implementation of MRV could stream copy-protected recordings from one TiVo to another for viewing. TiVo has not said whether it will implement that capability. If you would like to request that capability, you can do so here.


    14. How fast can I transfer recordings between TiVos?

      The more you are doing on the DVR, the slower files will transfer between TiVos. For example, if you are recording two different HD programs while watching a third, previously recorded HD program, MRV transfer speeds will be slower than if you were watching live TV with both tuners set to SD channels (or channels you don't receive).

      Wired transfers are faster than wireless. Wireless 802.11g throughput is limited to 15-17Mbps on the TiVo, and could be 10Mbps or less if you have a weak signal or sources of wireless interference (such as other adjacent wireless networks).

      Throughput will vary depending on whether you are transferring between two Series3 DVRs, two TiVoHD DVRs, or one of each.

      Note TiVo significantly improved MRV performance on the TivoHD with the 11.0 software.

      • Series3->Series3

        MRV throughput (i.e. transfer speed) between two TiVo Series3 DVRs is up to s ~45Mbps (20Gb/hour) under ideal conditions. Under more typical viewing conditions, throughput is 25-35Mbps.

        At 25-35Mbps on a 100Mbps network, there are no viewing delays and all high-definition recordings transfer fast enough to skip commercials.

      • TiVoHD->TiVoHD

        The TiVoHD can currently transfer recordings about 2/3 as fast as the Series3. MRV throughput (i.e. transfer speed) between two TivoHDs is ~31Mbps under ideal conditions. Under more typical viewing conditions, throughput is 22-24Mbps.

        At 22-24Mbps on a 100Mbps network, there are no viewing delays and most high-definition recordings transfer fast enough to skip commercials.

      • Series3->TiVoHD

        Throughput from a Series3 to a TiVoHD falls somewhere between Series3->Series3 and TiVoHD->TiVoHD transfers. Users have reported 35Mbps under ideal conditions and 25-30Mbps under typical viewing conditions.

        At 25-30Mbps on a 100Mbps network, there are no viewing delays and most high-definition recordings transfer fast enough to skip commercials.

      To put this in context, recordings from ABC-HD and FOX-HD typically have a bitrate of 10-14Mbps, while recordings from NBC-HD and CBS-HD typically have a bitrate of 14-17Mbps. Sports channels like ESPN may be as high as 18.6 Mbps, while premium movie channels like HBO-HD and SHO-HD are typically 11Mbps or less. Your MRV throughput (i.e. transfer speed) must match or exceed the recording's bitrate in order to eliminate viewing delays. Throughput should be at least 1.3x the recording's bitrate in order to skip all commercials on the fly.


    15. Why are MRV transfers slower with the TiVoHD than the Series3?

      TiVoPony did have this to say:
      Update: In the 9.4 software, TiVo improved transfer throughput on the TivoHD by 20-25%. Performance was improved by another 25+% in the 11.0 software. This information is reflected in the posts above.


    16. How do I calculate my MRV transfer rate?

      In the 9.4 software, TiVo added a transfer history screen with details on the last last programs transferred to and from the DVR. This screen can be found under Messages & Settings -> Settings -> Phone & Network -> View network diagnostics -> Transfer history.

      The "Incoming Series3 Transfer" and "Outgoing Series 3 Transfer" refer to the MRV transfer rate to and from the TiVo.


    17. Does the TiVo support Gigabit networking?

      No, and it wouldn't matter if they did. Due to resource limitations, neither the TiVo Series3 nor TiVoHD will ever come close to using the full throughput of the built-in 100Mbps ethernet connection.


    18. I want to improve the MRV transfer rate on my HD TiVo. Wireless just isn't cutting it. What are the alternatives to running a 100Mbps ethernet cable across the living room floor?

      Several higher-speed networking options are available at a price that avoid the need to run a network cable across the floor. Examples:

      • Coax networking / MoCA (top choice)

        The best choice for high-speed MRV with multiple TiVos is coax-based networking, also known as MoCA. This provides a 100Mbps ethernet connection between TiVos using the existing coax cable in your home.

        You'll need one Motorola NIM100 adapter for each room, plus one for your network router if it's in a room without a TiVo. Each NIM100 has one coax input, one coax [passthrough] output, and one 100Mbps ethernet port. Up to eight NIM100s can be used to provide 100Mbps ethernet connections to seven different rooms in your house. These NIM100 adapters are rather small at 5.5W x 6.5L x 1.75H and can be found only on ebay for $30-$60/ea; they are not currently available at retail.

        Each TiVo is setup as follows: Coax -> NIM100 -> Coax and ethernet -> TiVo

        You disconnect the coax from the back of each Tivo and connect it to a NIM100. Then you connect coax and ethernet cables from the NIM100 to the TiVo, as indicated above. There is no other setup or configuration required -- the network is setup automatically; all your TiVos are now have a 100Mbps wired connection to your router, using coax instead of ethernet.

        If you have Verizon FiOS, you do not need a NIM100 connected to your router because the Actiontec already has a NIM built-in. If you have FiOS, you only need one NIM100 per TiVo.

        Assuming your cable modem is in the same room with your router, you disconnect the coax from the cable modem and connect it to the input on the NIM100. You connect the coax output from the NIM100 to your cable modem and you you connect that NIM100's ethernet output to a LAN port on your router. If you have a DSL connection, you connect your coax to the NIM100 and the NIM100 ethernet output to a LAN port on your router.


      • 802.11n wireless

        Performance with 802.11n wireless is heavily dependent upon conditions in and around your home, including conflicting electronic devices such as 2.4GHz phones and video cameras, as well as nearby wireless networks. In areas with lots wireless interference, 802.11n may offer relatively little improvement over 802.11g.

        With ideal wireless conditions, 802.11n should provide sufficient usable throughput to "max out" your TivoHD (i.e. 30+Mbps). The TiVo does not support 802.11n wireless USB adapters, but you can replace your current router with a 802.11n model and connect a 802.11n wireless bridge to the TiVo's 100Mbps ethernet port.

        A "wireless bridge" is a wireless device that connects to the ethernet port on the DVR. It is basically an extender for your wireless network that also has one or more ethernet ports. These are commonly sold as gaming adapters for use with the consoles like the Xbox360. Examples of such products at Amazon.com include:

        D-Link DAP1522 (4 ports, $99)
        Linksys WGA600N (1 port, $83)
        Apple Airport Express (used with Airport Extreme base station)

        You would configure these products with a computer using the bundled software, and then move it your TV room.

        It is best to use a 802.11n bridge from the same manufacturer as your 802.11n router, because 802.11n hardware from some manufacturers is not 100% compatible with 802.11n hardware from other manufacturers.


      • Homeplug AV / Powerline AV networking

        Homeplug AV (also known as Powerline AV) adapters create a wired network using your home's electrical wiring. Each adapter has a power plug and 100Mbps ethernet jack. You would need one for each TiVo, plus one to connect to a LAN port on your router.

        Throughput with this technology ranges from 35Mbps to 80Mbps, depending on the condition of the electric wiring in your home.


    II. TiVoToGo (TiVo -> PC transfers)


    1. What is TiVoToGo?

      TiVoToGo allows you to download non-copy-protected standard definition and high-definition recordings from the TiVo with your computer.

      You can view these recordings on your computer, burn them to DVD or Blu-ray disk, or transfer them to your portable media player (iPod, Zune, etc). See the rest of this section for further information on those tasks.

      Screenshots: (1) TivoToGo with web browser, (2) TivoToGo with TiVo Desktop #1, and (3) TivoToGo with TiVo Desktop #2.


    2. How do I enable TiVoToGo?

      TiVo enables TiVoToGo on all new TiVos by default. However, it may take 48 hours before a new TiVo authorized for TTG by TiVo's servers.

      To check whether TTG is enabled on your TiVo, you can login to Manage My Account @ TiVo.com and verify the box for "Enable Video Downloads" is checked on your TiVo DVRs.

      Each TiVo will display the correct DVR name and "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo on the System Information screen once it is authorized. Screenshot.


    3. What do I need to use it?

      With the following applications, you can pick and choose what recordings to download from your TiVo.

      Windows


      Mac OSX



      All Platforms

      • Web Browser

        [​IMG]
        Click for larger.

        Open https://<Your_TiVo_IP>/ in your web browser and use 'tivo' as the login with your Media Access Key as the password. If you don't know your TiVo's IP address, you can find it under Settings -> Phone & Network.


    4. TiVo Desktop is asking for a "Media Access Key." Where do I get that?

      You can find your Media Access Key on your TiVo under Account & System Information -> Media Access Key. You can also find it under Manage My Account at TiVo.com.


    5. Are high-definition recordings downconverted during transfer?

      No. Recordings downloaded to your computer are 100% identical to the original. There is no downconversion or quality degradation of any kind.


    6. Do I have to wait until the download finishes to start watching it?

      No. When you use TiVo Desktop, you can watch recordings as they are transferred.


    7. How do I know what recordings I can transfer?

      You can transfer any recording, SD or HD, so long as it is not copy-protected (CCI 0x02).

      You can see whether a recording is copy-protected by selecting the program on your TiVo, and hitting the Info button. If the file is copy protected, the TiVo will list those copy restrictions. You may need to page down (channel -) on the Info screen to see this information.

      TiVo Desktop 2.6.2 (Windows) and Roxio Toast 10 Titanium (Mac) will also 'gray out' any copy-protected recordings to indicate they are ineligible for transfer.


    8. Why are recordings on my computer smaller than reported by TiVo Desktop or my TiVo?

      The TiVo INFO screen reports recording sizes based on 1,000,000,000 bytes per gigabyte. But there are actually 1,073,741,824 bytes per gigabyte, which is what you get with 1024 bytes per kilobyte, 1024 kilobytes per megabyte, and 1024 megabytes per gigabyte. Hence, the TiVo overstates file sizes by about 7%.

      TiVo Desktop also reports sizes incorrectly, because it takes the number of gigabytes (based on 1000) reported by the TiVo and multiples that by 1024 to display megabytes.

      In actual practice, recordings downloaded to your computer will be 93-95% the size reported by the TiVo. If they are significantly less than 93% of the TiVo's reported size, then that could indicate a problem with the transfer.


    9. Help! TiVo Desktop doesn't see my TiVo!

      As noted in FAQ #1, it may take 48 hours before a new TiVo is authorized for TiVoToGo by TiVo's servers.

      To check whether TTG is enabled on your TiVo, you can login to Manage My Account @ TiVo.com and verify the box for "Enable Video Downloads" is checked on your TiVo DVRs.

      You can confirm whether your TiVo is authorized and ready for MRV by checking the System Information screen. The System Information screen should show the correct name of your TiVo, and it should indicate "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo (screenshot). If you don't see both, then your DVR is not yet authorized and ready for TTG.

      If your System Information screen doesn't indicate "a,a,a" for TiVoToGo, and you've had your TiVo up and running for at least 24 hours, then you an try the following:

      1. On each TiVo, force a connection to the TiVo service using Settings -> Phone & Network.

      2. Reboot each TiVo after the connection is complete.

      If that doesn't fix the problem, then the cause is probably a security or firewall program on your computer. A number of third-party firewall and security programs are known to interfere with TiVo Desktop. If you can connect to your TiVo with a web browser @ https://<Your_TiVo_IP>/ using 'tivo' as the login and your Media Access Key as the password -- but not TiVo Desktop -- then that will confirm that your firewall software is the problem. Note TiVo Desktop works fine with Windows' built-in firewall.


    10. Help! Many of my channels are copy-protected and will not work with TiVoToGo.

      Few cable companies apply widespread copy protection, except to premium cable channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. If your provider is among those that does copy-protect most digital cable channels, there is not much you can do about that.

      FCC mandate permits cable companies to apply copy protection (CCI 0x02) -- preventing use of TTG and MRV -- on any channel outside of the limited basic tier. This is typically an independent decision by the cable company, but it can also be done at the request of the content provider, some of whom now want copy protection as part of the contract renewal for their channel(s).

      Cable companies are not permitted to copy-protect local channels. If you are not able to use TTG (or MRV) with a recording from a local channel, you should contact your cable provider to have them correct the problem. Tell them they are using a CCI value of 0x02 on their local channels that prevents copying, in violation of federal law.


    11. How fast can I transfer TiVo recordings to my PC / Mac?

      As with MRV, the more you are doing on the DVR, the slower files will transfer to your PC / Mac. For example, if you are recording two different HD programs while watching a third, previously recorded HD program, TiVoToGo transfer speeds will be up to 50% slower than if you were simply watching live TV with both tuners set to SD channels.

      • Series3

        Under ideal conditions, the TiVo Series3 can transfer files to a PC or Mac at up to ~18Mbps on a 100Mbps network. Under more typical conditions, TiVoToGo throughput is ~12Mbps (1.5 Megabytes per second). Throughput will vary depending on whether you are watching or recording SD or HD channels.

        At 12Mbps on the Series3, the typical one-hour SD recording will transfer in less than 20 minutes. One-hour of high-definition can take as little as 40 minutes or as much as 90 minutes to transfer, depending on the channel, content, and how much it is compressed by your provider.

      • TiVoHD

        The TiVoHD can transfer recordings about 3/4 as fast as the Series3.

        Under ideal conditions, the TivoHD can transfer files to a PC or Mac at up to ~12Mbps on a 100Mbps network. Under typical conditions, TiVoToGo throughput is 8.5-9.5 Mbps (1.1 Megabytes per second). Throughput will vary depending on whether you are watching or recording SD or HD channels.

      Be aware that some third-party security (firewall) and antivirus programs can slow throughput with TivoToGo because they continuously scan all incoming traffic on your computer. For example, some versions of Kaspersky Internet Security are known to limit TiVoToGo throughput to as little as 5Mbps.

      If you are transferring a lot of recordings to your PC, and would like to transfer at maximum possible speed, then set both tuners to channels you do not receive, which temporarily disables the channel buffers. Be sure to use a program like TiVo Desktop for Windows or iTiVo for OSX to queue up lots of recordings to transfer while you sleep.


    12. Why at TiVoToGo downloads so much slower than MRV transfers to another TiVo?[/b]

      High-definition recordings are relatively large files. They are stored on the TiVo's hard drive as transport streams in a proprietary format. When you download a recording from the TiVo, the TiVo muxes the recorded streams stored on the hard drive into a single MPG file that can be played on a PC or Mac. The TiVo does this "on the fly" with its relatively slow DVR CPU, and the result is about 10-15Mbps download throughput on the Series3 and 9-12Mbps on the TivoHD.

      MRV transfers to other TiVos are two to three times as fast.


    13. Why are TiVoToGo transfers slower with the TiVoHD than the Series3?

      TiVoPony did have this to say:
      Note: TiVo improves the TivoHD's TTG throughput in the 9.4 software.


    14. How do I calculate my TiVoToGo transfer rate?

      In the 9.4 software, TiVo added a transfer history screen with details on the last last programs transferred to and from the DVR. This screen can be found under Messages & Settings -> Settings -> Phone & Network -> View network diagnostics -> Transfer history.

      The "Videos copied to remote device" refers to the TivoToGo transfer rate.


    15. I downloaded a recording and it has a .TiVo extension. What is that?

      All TiVo recordings are saved within an encrypted TiVo wrapper, hence the .TiVo extension. With TiVo Desktop installed, you should be able to view these .TiVo files using most Windows media viewers.

      Several popular DVD authoring programs such as Toast 9 Titanium for OSX and Roxio Easy Media Creator and VideoRedo TVSuite (screenshot) for Windows now include direct support for .TiVo files. Other programs like TiVo Desktop Plus for Windows and Roxio Popcorn 3 for OSX can directly accept and convert these files into smaller versions for transfer to iPods and other portable video players.


    16. I want to use another program, but it doesn't accept .TiVo files. What do I do?

      If you remove that .TiVo wrapper, you get a MPG/MPEG file which most video programs can accept.

      On the Mac, iTiVo and TiVo Decode Manager will download files from the TiVo and save them as MPG format.

      On Windows, an application called VideoReDo (free 14-day trial, $49.99) will take a .TiVo file and allow you to save it as a .MPV, .MPG, .TS, or .VOB file. VideoRedo also provides the option to automatically cut all commercials from a TiVo recording, as seen in this screenshot. A free alternative is TiVo Decoder GUI 1.1, which will open .TiVo files and save them in MPG format.


    17. How do I view the recordings on my computer?

      On a PC, you need to install Tivo Desktop 2.6.2. If you still have issues with audio or video playback, download and install the K-Lite Codec Pack. During installation, be sure to check "Cyberlink" as the default MPEG-2 decoder and Windows Media Player as your default player. You will need to reboot for installation to take effect.

      On a Mac, the best playback software for TiVo recordings comes bundled with Roxio Toast 10 Titanium. A freeware alternative is VLC, but this requires that files first be decoded into MPEG-2 (MPG) format as detailed in the previous FAQ.

    18. How do I remove commercials from my TiVo recordings?

      On Windows, several different programs exist to automatically remove commercials from a recording. By far the easiest and most popular program for this task is VideoRedo (14-day trial, $50 to buy). With VideoRedo, you open the TiVo recording, select "Start Ad-Detective Scan" to automatically detect and mark the commercials for deletion, and then click "save" to save the recording with commercials removed (screenshot).

      On the Mac, no applications exist to automatically remove commercials from a recording. Roxio did add editing capability to its new Toast 10 Titanium suite; that should allow you to manually mark commercials for removal.

      If you already own the Apple Quicktime MPEG-2 Playback Component ($20) installed, another alternative is MPEG Streamclip for OSX (free). With MPEG Streamclip, you can manually remove commercials on recordings you've downloaded with TiVo Decode Manager. Once you've marked the commercials for removal as explained in the Streamclip Guide (Help menu), set the Audio Mode to "Surround", and click "Save As" to save the edited file in MPEG format. Credit for this bit goes to member hearncl.


    19. How do I edit [downloaded] recordings in VideoRedo TVSuite?

      VideoRedo very simple, once you understand how it works.

      You can choose from two modes of operation: scene mode and cut mode. In scene mode, the video segments you select are the only parts of the video saved as part of the new file. In cut mode, the video segments you select are removed, leaving the original video minus those segments in the new file. Pick which one you want under Tools -> Options -> General Parameters.

      For the purposes of this message, I am going to assume you have cut mode selected.

      [​IMG]

      You can select Ad-Detective->Start Ad-Detective Scan and VideoRedo will scan the recording for commercials and mark any that it finds for removal. The accuracy on this isn't 100%, so you'll want to check the cuts before you save your commercial-free file.

      In the above screenshot, note the bar with the red and green. The green represents the video that will be saved and the red represents the video that will be cut. Positioned at the center of that bar is a gray slider control. That marks the current position in the video.

      You can drag the slider control with your mouse, and the video window updates as you do so. You can also use the transport controls to find the spot in the video that you want to cut. These transport controls are customizable in Tools -> Options -> Navigation. I have the |> set to advance one frame, the >> button to advance 1 second, and the >>> button set to advance 3 seconds. If you want to go to a specific timecode, select Edit -> GoTo TimeCode (or Cntrl-T). Of course, you can also play the video and pause it to find the position you want.

      To make it easier to find a specific frame or scene in a video, there is a preview bar below the video that shows nine frames. This includes the current frame, plus four earlier frames and four later frames, in selectable increments of frame, 0.1s, 0.25s, 0.5s, 1s, 2s, 5s, 10s, 30s, and 60s.

      You position the slider where you want to start the cut, and then you click the "Sel. start" button. That marks the start of the video segment you want to cut. You then position the slider where you want to end the cut, and you click "Sel. end." That marks the end of the video segment you want to cut. If you want to preview the cut, just click on the blue button above the volume control; that switches between editing and preview mode. After you've got the start and the end that you want, click the "Add Selection" button and that segment is added to the Scene list for cutting purposes; if you click the "Add Unselection" button, then everything not selected is added to the Scene list for cutting purposes. You can then move on to the next cut.

      VideoRedo also allows you to combine segments from multiple videos into a single file. Make all the edits you want in one video, and then save the project under File -> Save. This keeps a record of all the edits you make in a project file. From the menu, select Joiner -> Add Current Project to Joiner list. Open a new video file and make all the edits you want to that, then again select Joiner -> Add Current Project to Joiner list. Once you've added all the video files you want, select Joiner -> Edit Joiner list and use the Up and Down buttons to place the edited videos in the order you want.

      When done, click "Create DVD" or "Save As..." to save the file as a MPG, MPV, TS, .TiVo file, or DVD folder. If you click "Create DVD," you'll get the following menu:

      [​IMG]

      Those are the basics. VideoRedo has a number of other features too, like a title editor for video title screens. This is separate from DVD menu creation, which VideoRedo TVSuite also supports.


    20. How do I copy TiVo recordings to my portable video player?

      On Windows, TiVo Desktop Plus 2.6 ($25) is the easiest way to to get recordings on your portable video player. On the Mac, Roxio Popcorn ($50) will download shows and convert them to a format for your portable video player. Note neither of these applications will remove commercials. If you want to remove commercials, then you'll need to follow the directions in the previous FAQ to obtain a commercial-free MPG file.

      On the Mac, you can convert commercial-free MPGs for your portable video player using Roxio Popcorn or VisualHub (free demo, $23 to buy). VisualHub will take recordings downloaded with TiVo Decode Manager and convert them for portable video players and DVDs. If you are a more advanced user, Handbrake is a free alternative.

      On Windows, there are a host of different applications that can convert MPGs for use in portable video players. Examples of free applications include Videora Converter and Handbrake.


    21. How do I create standard DVDs from .TiVo recordings?

      DVD players -- even those with 720p and 1080p upconversion -- are not able to display high-definition video. However, a number of different authoring applications will take high-definition .TiVo files, automatically downconvert them to SD resolution, and burn them to DVD for playback in standard DVD players.

      Popular Windows programs to do this include VideoRedo TVSuite and Roxio's Easy Media Creator. VideoRedo TVSuite (14-day demo, $30 upgrade from VideoRedo) will also cut the commercials before burning to DVD. Screenshot: #1, #2, #3.

      For the Mac, Roxio's Toast 9 Titanium ($80) is the most popular application to download and burn .TiVo recordings to DVD. If you have the older v8, be sure to grab the update to 8.03. Another popular choice is VisualHub ($23), which will take recordings downloaded with TiVo Decode Manager and burn them to DVD.

      To create DVDs with Visual Hub:


    22. Can I burn high-definition recordings from my TiVo to DVD for viewing on my HD-DVD or Blu-ray player?

      Yes, you can burn high-definition TiVo recordings to DVD for playback in full high-definition on HD-DVD and Blu-ray players. See the following thread:

      Creating HD-DVDs and Blu-ray disks with TiVoToGo using DVD media...


    23. Why do my TiVoToGo transfers always halt after 2048Mb or 4096Mb?

      If you your file system is FAT32 (instead of NTFS), downloads will be limited to 4096Mb. Some third-party firewall and Internet security applications also limit each file transfer to 2048Mb or 4096Mb. Some web browers do as well.

      Kaspersky Internet Security is an example of a security application that limits transfers, but it has a workaround. Add the following programs to Kaspersky's trusted applications list, with the options don't scan files, network traffic, or restrict application activity:

      TiVoTransfer.exe
      TiVoDesktop.exe
      TiVoServer.exe

      At one point, IE6 limited downloads to 2048Mb and IE7 limited downloads to 4096Mb, although I don't know whether that is still the case.


    24. I have an iPod Touch. The iPod selection in TiVo Desktop only encodes at 320x240. How do I encode for my iPod Touch at 640x480?

      The following applies to TiVo Desktop 2.5 for Windows. It is not yet tested under TiVo Desktop 2.6.2.

      To do that, first download the free XN Resource Editor application.

      Run the XN Resource Editor and use it to open the c:\Program Files\TiVo\Desktop\Plus\TiVoTrans.dll.

      Select ENCODEPROFILES -> 220 -> English on the left. Scroll down to the bottom where you see:
      You can edit the values in bold. In the case of the iPod Touch, you would change hrez to 640 and vrez to 480. If you increase resolution, you'll probably also want to increase the bitrate; you might try a vbitrateK of 1000 with a vmaxbitrateK of 1200.

      Save the change and then select the "H.264 compatible device" profile in TiVo Desktop under File -> Preferences -> Portable Devices.


    III. TiVoToComeBack (PC -> TiVo transfers)


    1. What is TiVoToComeBack (TTCB)?

      TiVoToComeBack -- also known as TTCB -- is the unofficial name for the ability to transfer recordings from a PC or Mac to the TiVo for playback.

      Screenshots: (1) setup video folders, (2) setup video folders #2, and (3) videos on Now Playing list.


    2. How do I use it?

      Install latest version of TiVo Desktop is installed on your Windows PC or Mac.

      Under Windows, you have two options to transfer videos. You can create a season pass to a folder, and any compatible videos placed in that folder will automatically transfer to the TiVo. These videos will be organized into their own folder on the TiVo's Now Playing list. Alternatively, you can setup a folder where you manually select the videos on the TiVo for transfer; when transferred, these videos will not be organized into a folder on the TiVo. Screenshot.

      Under Mac OSX, hold down the Apple key when you open TiVo Desktop from System Preferences. When you do that, you'll see a Video menu. Enable that video option and select the folder you want to use. Put your videos in that folder.

      Mac users can permanently enable the Video menu in TiVo Desktop -- eliminating the need to hold down the Apple key -- by running this Applescript from member Dennis Wilkinson.

      If you created an auto-transfer folder, simply select the recording from your Now Playing list as you would any other recording. If you did not enable auto-transfers, but rather manual transfers, then select the computer icon with your computer's name at the bottom of the Now Playing list. It will list any supported videos in the folders you setup. If the folder contains no supported videos, then you will not see an icon for your computer on the TiVo.


    3. What type of video files can I transfer to the TiVo?

      With the free version of TiVo Desktop for Windows and OSX, TiVo only supports the transfer of .TiVo recordings that you previously downloaded to your computer with TiVoToGo.

      Members have found that they can also transfer most SD and HD MPEG-2 (MPG) files, but TiVo does not officially support that with the free version of TiVo Desktop.


    4. What about other video formats?

      If you want to transfer other video formats, you'll need an application to convert those files to a compatible TiVo format. TiVo Desktop Plus 2.6.2 for Windows ($25) is the easiest and most popular program to do this, although two freeware alternatives exist -- TiVo.Net for Windows, and pyTiVo for Windows, OSX, and Linux. These alternatives are more complicated to setup, but once configured properly, they generally work just as well as Tivo Desktop.

      If you have a Mac, you'll have to use pyTivo to send video files other than past TiVo recordings and MPGs to TiVo.


    5. If I buy TiVo Desktop Plus for Windows, what video formats can I transfer to the TiVo?

      • Windows Media Video (.wmv)
      • Quicktime Movie (.mov)
      • MPEG-4/H.264 (.mp4,.m4v,.mp4v)
      • MPEG-2 (.mpg,.mpeg,.mpe,.mp2,.mp2v,.mpv2)
      • DivX or XviD (.avi,.divx)

      Both standard definition and high-definition videos in these formats are supported.


    6. What about high-definition recordings? Can I transfer those?

      The TiVoHD and Series3 will play high-definition recordings previously downloaded from the DVR. Both will also play most MPEG-2 (MPG) high-definition recordings.

      TiVo Desktop Plus can now support other formats in high-definition. High-definition DIVX, MP4, and Quicktime files are converted to high-definition MPEG-2 and transferred to the TiVo.


    7. When will TiVo directly support DIVX, MP4, and Quicktime files without the need to convert them to MPEG-2?

      The hardware in the TivoHD and TiVo Series3 supports MPEG-4 and VC-1 (WM9), but the software does not. TiVo is expected to enable direct support for those formats in a future software update, but it is unknown when that will happen.


    8. I installed TiVo Desktop 2.6.2, but I don't see my PC on the TiVo?

      Some third-party firewall programs can block the TiVo Desktop server.

      You will only see the PC on your TiVo if the TiVo Recordings folder contains a compatible file. Since the free version of TiVo Desktop will only transfer .TiVo and .MPG files, you won't see your PC unless the TiVo Recordings folder contains at least one of those files.

      Other file formats such as AVI, DIVX, and WMV will not show up unless you have TiVo Desktop Plus 2.6.2 ($25) or one of the other applications mentioned in FAQ #4.


    9. I transferred some recordings from the TivoHD (or Series3) to my PC, and then transferred those recordings from the PC to my TiVo Series2, but they won't play?

      TiVo Desktop won't prevent you from transferring HD recordings to the Series2, but the Series2 will not play them. The Series2 can only play recordings from SD channels.

      Some SD recordings downloaded from the TivoHD (or Series3) are also incompatible with the Series2. When you use MRV to transfer SD recordings from the TiVoHD or Series3 to the Series2, the TiVo transcodes (converts) those SD recordings to a compatible SD format for the Series2. However, you bypass that transcoding (conversion) when you transfer the recording directly to your PC.


    10. I setup an auto-transfer video folder with ten recordings. Why did only three videos transfer?

      By default, TiVo Desktop is set to keep just three videos from an auto-transfer folder on the TiVo at once. You can change that number, as seen in this screenshot. After you've deleted one of those videos, the next one will transfer.


    11. How do I know what videos the TiVo will transfer first?

      TiVo Desktop 2.6.2 transfers the oldest recordings first. As you delete older recordings from the DVR, newer recordings are transferred.


    12. I successfully transferred a .tivo or compatible mpg file from my PC to the Tivo. It plays fine on my PC but playback is pixelated on the Tivo. What gives?

      This FAQ and answer was contributed by member wgw.

      There appears to be a problem with the process which converts the PC compatible MPEG program stream back to the TiVo ty stream. Errors in the conversion are expressed as pixelation and other audio/video glitches. This defect becomes more pronounced at higher bitrates. HD recordings will exhibit this problem more than SD recordings due to their higher bitrate.

      High audio bitrates above 425kbps from HD sources not recorded on the tivo have also been shown to cause severe playback problems. It is not known at this time if high audio bitrates are affected by the same defect in the tivo conversion process, or if the tivo is simply not capable of playing high audio bitrates.

      What can I do until Tivo fixes this?

      You can downsample the video to a lower bitrate before transferring it to the Tivo. 17mbps seems to be the maximum bitrate peaks that the tivo conversion process can handle before the errors in the conversion begins to cause noticable pixelation.

      An easy way to downsample the recording is to use a program like VideoReDo to convert the .tivo or mpg file to a .ts file (transport stream). Then use pyTivo or Tivo.Net to transfer the file to the Tivo. These programs will transcode the recording to a lower bitrate that is more palatable to the current tivo conversion process. Or you can manually downsample the recording using the transcoder of your choice before using Tivo Desktop to send the mpeg to the Tivo.


    13. How fast can I transfer videos from my computer to the TiVo?

      As with MRV and TTG, the more you are doing on the DVR, the slower files will transfer. If you are recording two different HD programs while watching a third, previously recorded HD program, PC -> TiVo transfer speeds will be up to 50% slower than if you were watching live TV with both tuners set to SD channels.

      • Series3

        Currently unknown.

      • TiVoHD

        Videos will transfer from PC to TiVo at about 11Mbps under ideal conditions, and 6-7 Mbps under typical conditions.


    14. I just bought TiVo Desktop Plus. Why is TiVo playback quality on my AVI, DIVX, WMV, and Quicktime files so poor?

      The following applies to TiVo Desktop for Windows.

      Make sure you download TiVo Desktop Plus 2.6.2 -- a free upgrade from v2.5. TiVo Desktop Plus 2.5 was set to stream video at 480x480 resolution with a constant bitrate of 2000 Kbps. That doesn't look very good scaled on larger displays. TiVo Desktop 2.6.2 is able to stream at higher resolutions and bitrates, thereby improving quality.
    Why do my TiVoToGo transfers always halt after 2048Mb or 4096Mb?
     
  2. Oct 26, 2007 #2 of 366
    moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

    11,150
    33
    Jan 23, 2006
    Mission...
    FANTASTIC FAQ! Great job as usual. Mods please sticky this thread.
     
  3. Oct 26, 2007 #3 of 366
    HDTiVo

    HDTiVo Not so Senior Member

    5,556
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    Nov 27, 2002
    If you transfer an HD recording ala III.7, can you MRV to S3/HD and play the show? :cool:

    A simple conversion of multiplying GB/hr by 2.2 gives you mbps to a very close approximation. Easy to do in your head.
     
  4. Oct 26, 2007 #4 of 366
    bown

    bown New Member

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    Nov 3, 2006
    I realize there is a separate forum for TTG stuff, but since you made a FAQ here (which is very good by the way), perhaps add a question for section II:
    Why is HD content so choppy when played back on my PC?
    ...and include some sort on condensed answer from
    http://www.tivocommunity.com/tivo-vb/showthread.php?t=371505
     
  5. Oct 26, 2007 #5 of 366
    Jiffylush

    Jiffylush New Member

    139
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    Oct 31, 2006
    Anyone have feedback on step 8?

    TiVo Desktop Plus is working so I am a little worried about messing something up... I have noticed that transcoded xvids look blurry, but blurry is better than not working.

    So, if anyone has tried this let me know what kind of results you are getting.

    edit: I just set mine to 720/6000/6000, I won't be able to test til tonight but I will post feedback as soon as I can.
     
  6. Oct 26, 2007 #6 of 366
    Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    Oct 2, 2007
    This FAQ contains a serious error that is continually spread throughout this forum.

    The transfer speeds ARE NOT CPU limited. Even the best hard drives out there can only output 60 to 80 MB/s read speeds. Even if it came with a Gigabit ethernet controller you would still see the same output. Over Wireless G, you'll never see speeds faster than 19 MB/s simply because that's the maximum sustained throughput.
     
  7. Oct 26, 2007 #7 of 366
    Jiffylush

    Jiffylush New Member

    139
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    Oct 31, 2006
    Transcoding is CPU limited, if you are transferring a video that is already mpeg2 then it isn't transcoding so it isn't CPU limited, but if you are transferring an xvid or something else that has to be transcoded then it most likely is cpu limited.

    edit: just to clarify this is in reference to TTCB
     
  8. Oct 26, 2007 #8 of 366
    bkdtv

    bkdtv New Member

    7,902
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    Jan 9, 2003
    DC Metro Area
    Created DVDs with TiVoToGo: Three Easy Steps

    1. Automatically download recordings to PC in MPEG2 format with Dolby Digital 5.1.

      [​IMG]
      Alternatively, you can use a web browser as seen here.

    2. Automatically remove commercials using VideoRedo TVSuite.

      [​IMG]
      Red areas are deleted commercials. Note the "Create DVD" button at the bottom right.

    3. Burn commercial-free to DVD with Dolby Digital 5.1.

      [​IMG]

    I like this approach because quality is 100&#37; identical to the original broadcast on SD recordings, and much better on HD recordings. You also preserve the original Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack.
     
  9. Oct 26, 2007 #9 of 366
    HDTiVo

    HDTiVo Not so Senior Member

    5,556
    0
    Nov 27, 2002
    Remember how we looked at the guts of the TiVo HD in the Wild Speculation thread with regard to recording/tuning/transcoding... it might be worth taking another look inside with ethernet (USB-Ethernet too) in mind this time, just to see the hardware. Probably beyond me to do that, but you... :)
     
  10. Oct 26, 2007 #10 of 366
    moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

    11,150
    33
    Jan 23, 2006
    Mission...
    Hard drive activity most certainly influences transfer speeds, but doesn't tell the full story. Case in point for my S3s if I have them on same hard wired switch and tune all tuners to channels I don't receive (thereby eliminating disk activity due to buffering) and initiate MRV transfers between them transfers still seem to peak at around 44 Mbps. I'm not exactly sure what happens during MRV transfers but it's possible there is still audio/video muxing, decryption and encryption taking place during the transfer which would consume CPU. I wish there was a way to bring up a CPU meter on the Tivos to monitor CPU load...
    For TTG we do know that the Tivo is creating .TiVo encrypted stream so certainly that one is CPU limited to some degree.
     
  11. Oct 26, 2007 #11 of 366
    c3

    c3 TiVoholic

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    Sep 8, 2000
    Silicon...
    Hard drives can transfer at 60-80MB/s, but that's only for sequential access. When you have to seek all over the drive, the transfer rate drops way down. TiVo has to reserve resources to record two streams and play back one stream properly. All other activities are secondary and have to share the remaining resources.
     
  12. Oct 26, 2007 #12 of 366
    Joybob

    Joybob New Member

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    Oct 2, 2007
    Still, it's not CPU limited which was my original beef.

    Wired Ethernet 100, will give you about 7 to 10 MB/s sustained.
    Wireless G will give you about 2 to 2.8 MB/s sustained.

    We have to live with the fact that current networking specs simply can't handle HD content at a stream-able speed.
     
  13. Oct 26, 2007 #13 of 366
    c3

    c3 TiVoholic

    3,067
    0
    Sep 8, 2000
    Silicon...
    One HD stream is less than 2.5MB/s.
     
  14. Oct 26, 2007 #14 of 366
    Phantom Gremlin

    Phantom Gremlin New Member

    1,555
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    Jun 20, 2002
    Tualatin,...
    You are seriously confused and thereby helping spread more confusion throughout this forum.

    I will spell out what your problem is, it's units.

    Hard drives output (approximately) 60 to 80 megaBYTES per second read speeds.

    802.11g theoretically transfers at up to 55 megaBITS per second.

    802.11g transfers at (perhaps*) 19 megaBITS per second in realistic conditions.

    You have confused megaBITS and megaBYTES in your rant.

    BTW an HD program is (at best) 19 megaBITS per second, so it's not entirely out of the realm of possibility to achieve this over Wireless G.

    * I say perhaps because I'm willing to accept your value here. In reality the transfer speed is much more complicated than that, affected by distance, interference, the presence of 802.11b devices, etc.
     
  15. Oct 26, 2007 #15 of 366
    bkdtv

    bkdtv New Member

    7,902
    0
    Jan 9, 2003
    DC Metro Area
    Let us know how it goes.

    If you have a Series3 on a 100Mbps network, you can probably experiment with even higher bitrate values (i.e. 8000+).
     
  16. Oct 26, 2007 #16 of 366
    Jiffylush

    Jiffylush New Member

    139
    0
    Oct 31, 2006
    I am Series 3, and my network is actually gigiabit (although I believe the s3 only has a 10/100 nic). I will try the current settings first (720/6000/6000), then will bump it up and try to get some ideas about how quickly the files transfer and if I have any stuttering or whatever.

    FWIW my computer is a 3.2 dual core (not core 2 duo) w/ 2gb of memory running vista and tivo desktop plus 2.5.
     
  17. Oct 26, 2007 #17 of 366
    Jiffylush

    Jiffylush New Member

    139
    0
    Oct 31, 2006
    Well, changing the values didn't stop it from working, but I can't tell a difference yet.

    I think the problem is that the resolution on the avi file I have is already very low.
     
  18. Oct 27, 2007 #18 of 366
    naclone

    naclone New Member

    118
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    Feb 11, 2002
    with regard to TTCB --> S3, my settings are 720/6000/6000 and I am trying to upload some HD avi files, and while I know I won't get HD resolution, I'd at least like to get the proper aspect ratio. right now everything is squished horizontally. It's filling the screen from top to bottom okay, but there are black bars on either side even though the source file is 16:9

    any idea why this might be happening? do i need to set the hrez higher?
     
  19. Oct 27, 2007 #19 of 366
    rrg

    rrg New Member

    78
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    Apr 22, 2004
    NJ
    From III.3:

    Where are people discussing HD transfers? I saw no mention of it on the long "TTG and MRV go live today!" thread, except that TivoPony told us that only TiVo-recorded HD material could be sent back via TTCB.

    If it's true that we can transfer other HD material to the S3, this is fabulous news. I've spent years messing about with various media players and HD recording playback solutions (D-VHS, Roku, MyHD, LinkPlayer, Helios, TViX, others), all of them half-assed in one way or another. Recording has never been the problem (I have many ways to do that) but playback has always been problematic.

    This new capability adds great value to my TiVo Series 3 overnight. I'll very likely get another one (or two).

    I'm still not crazy about the "transfer" model that TiVo uses (as opposed to the "streaming" that's done with most other LAN playback solutions) but if it's as fast as many are claiming (for HD) then it'll be okay.
     
  20. Oct 27, 2007 #20 of 366
    rrg

    rrg New Member

    78
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    Apr 22, 2004
    NJ
    I meant to add: thanks, bkdtv, for another superbly helpful FAQ and summary.
     

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