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TiVo Series 5

Discussion in 'TiVo Premiere DVRs' started by geekmedic, Mar 11, 2013.

  1. Mar 14, 2013 #81 of 423
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    For people that are concerned with speed you still have the option of using regular Ethernet. HEC would be optional.

    Personally I would sacrifice a little network speed for a cleaner install. Anything to pare down the rats nest of cables currently behind my A/V rack.
     
  2. Mar 14, 2013 #82 of 423
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    That's why I've been using wireless for more of my devices. I'm already using around fourteen GigE switches(8 and 5 port) The devices that only need an internet connection for streaming apps can get up to 60Mb/s(depending on the device, My Roku 3 for instance gets 60Mb/s over wireless) of throughput over wireless which is way more than enough for the streaming apps. So I've been connecting them over Wi-Fi lately since I would need to add more switches to connect more devices.
     
  3. Mar 14, 2013 #83 of 423
    Arcady

    Arcady Stargate Fan

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    Fourteen switches? In a house? That's really really ridiculous. Why wouldn't you have a couple 12 or 24 port switches and run everything to that location? Making things jump through switch after switch will cause collisions and slow things way down. Moving devices that coule be wired to wireless seems like the opposite of a good idea. You're going to clog up the available wireless bandwidth with more than about 12 devices on any one AP.
     
  4. Mar 14, 2013 #84 of 423
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Because I can't do that. I live in a Condo and I can't run any more wiring outside the building. And the only way to run some inside would be to tear up the few areas that have drywall in the ceiling.(Which I did do in a couple of areas when I had some water damage repaired) The rest of the place has concrete ceilings so those areas are limited to outside wiring.

    As far as switches. I have over sixty devices on my network and I don't have any network issues. I can chain several switches and there will not be a noticeable difference from a user perspective as having one switch. I'll still hit 155Mb/s download speeds form the internet and still have 5ms ping times Still game with zero issues. I can still transfer at 900Mb/s+ speeds from PC to PC. And can have dozens of concurrent transfers going without any problems.

    Now I do have my network physically separated. So my TiVos/TiVo desktop are on one section, media players and PCs on another, Cameras/wireless on another section, and a fourth section for my alarm system and other devices. So on each section if the devices communicate to each other they never need to go through the router. The only time they would go through there is to get internet access or to communicate with a device on another section. I've been doing it this way for many years with no issues. I even used to have over seventy devices on my network.

    I used to use four APs at one time. But since since getting a couple of Asus routers with simultaneous 2.4 and 5Ghz wireless radios. I get more coverage and bandwidth for wireless than when I had the four APs.
     
  5. Mar 14, 2013 #85 of 423
    wmcbrine

    wmcbrine Ziphead

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    You're talking to the guy who used to run like nine TiVos. :)

    I have, let's see... five switches in service currently. The central switch is a 16-porter, but I still need the others, because I only run one line to each room.
     
  6. Mar 14, 2013 #86 of 423
    innocentfreak

    innocentfreak Active Member

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    I think I have 7 switches ranging from 5 to 8 ports. I wired my place after the fact. In some spots I planned ok, but in others I highly underestimated what I would need. For example I ran 4 drops to my TV and I am up to 8 devices there.

    One of these days I need to clean it up and rerun a bunch of stuff. Unfortunately my friend who does this for me has been sidelined due to health issues so I just have to add and upgrade switches as I need them.
     
  7. Mar 14, 2013 #87 of 423
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I've got 5 as well. In my case I could simplify a little and get it down to just 3. But I see no reason to spend the money. They work fine.

    For the A/V rack though it would be nice if all my devices could network via HDMI and the switch was just my A/V receiver. Would make the wiring for everything a LOT simpler. Plus the blinking lights on my switch kind of drive me nuts. (been meaning to break out the electrical tape and "fix" that)
     
  8. Mar 14, 2013 #88 of 423
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I think it's silly to run drops from a central location to every device in the house. Makes much more sense to run one drop from a central location to each room, then use a switch in those rooms to feed multiple devices. A bunch of long drops to each device are more expensive and harder to maintain.
     
  9. Mar 14, 2013 #89 of 423
    Philmatic

    Philmatic Member

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    Yes, Comcast VoD on TiVo uses the SeaChange software middle-ware to handle the communication between the public internet (Since Comcast cannot assume or require that you are using their internet service) and Comcast's private cable headends. They originally used SeaChange hardware as well, but eventually settled on Cisco for production use.

    This is also very clear once you use Comcast VoD, it ties up a Tuner. :) The reason why the Mini can support Comcast VoD out of the box is because it uses the same tuner borrowing logic that is used to tune Live TV. It's all still managed by the host DVR.

    The reason they don't count VoD usage against your cap is because it comes down the cable tv network and is not internet based. They don't HAVE to prioritize it in any way, in fact if it was purely IP based, they would likely run into net neutrality issues.

    Of course one huge downside is that if you don't have internet or it is down, VoD will not work, but since the premiere is useless without an internet connection, it's not that common.

    http://www.zatznotfunny.com/2012-04/tivo-xfinity-on-demand-arrives-in-san-francisco/
    http://www.lightreading.com/blog/video-services/comcast-vod-coming-to-tivo/240126259
     
  10. Mar 14, 2013 #90 of 423
    Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I looked it up and the Xfinity thing I was thinking about is the XBox version. It is pure IP and they don't count it towards your bandwidth cap.

    I wish they would do that same thing with Charter that they do with Comcast. I'd love to have access to the VOD content I pay for. But I don't want to pay for an HD box just for the rare occasion I might use it.
     
  11. Mar 14, 2013 #91 of 423
    P42

    P42 New Member

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    Seriously? What are you basing this on? :eek:
     
  12. Mar 14, 2013 #92 of 423
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    The same here with FiOS. I wish they would do it too. Instead FiOS gives us live streaming for a bunch of channels on the Xbox. I don't want to go back to how I watched TV in the 70's. At least that is what live streaming channels feels like.
     
  13. Mar 14, 2013 #93 of 423
    Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    Yes.

    Yes.

    Comcast has gone all-digital, although they haven't done MPEG-4 yet. There is absolutely no reason to be running analog in the year 2013. It's archaic and outdated. Get rid of it.

    Comcast weasels out of it by triple-channeling the HD's, which I HATE, because they look like crap. MPEG-4 however, would allow Comcast to deliver internet, phone, VOD, and TV and have enough bandwidth on an 860mhz system.

    Yup.

    The first part has already been done by Comcast on a massive scale, so that's all set. There aren't that many older STBs out there, and Verizon is doing that, so that's possible as well. Verizon also went all-digital quite a while back.

    And, if they wanted to do SDV, TiVos should already be able to handle it via software/IP, and not with a TA (TAs would still be needed for MCE unless Comcast put out software to do it and you can only imagine the uproar THAT would cause).

    Most devices are only 100mbps anyways.
     
  14. Mar 14, 2013 #94 of 423
    innocentfreak

    innocentfreak Active Member

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    I was doing it to try and cut down on switches. I knew I would have the 360, TV, and the TiVo so I ran an extra in case.

    Also some of my rooms are setup so one drop wouldn't work because I would need cables run open all over the room to cover every device. I could possibly get away with a drop per wall.
     
  15. Mar 14, 2013 #95 of 423
    Bigg

    Bigg Active Member

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    With the cost of switches, it makes more sense to just do one drop per location on a retrofit and then use switches. Of course it makes sense to do 3-4 to support future applications on a pre-wire.
     
  16. Mar 15, 2013 #96 of 423
    atmuscarella

    atmuscarella Active Member

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    Drops are a way to centralize and maximize your switches. Given how cheap 5 & 8 port GB switches have become, cost is no longer really much of a consideration.

    Centralization of your switches does clean things up some but I would not spend the time and/or money to run enough drops to centralization my switches - I have about 20 wired devices on my network.
     
  17. Mar 15, 2013 #97 of 423
    sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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    Back to next gen TiVo discussion??? :rolleyes:

    I expect the next box to support an RF remote and/or WiFi Direct (a la Roku).

    There will also be a find remote button on the front of the unit.

    I hope Dan is correct that the hardware will be outsourced/made by Pace. That should allow TiVo to sell it at a lower price point since Pace has an optimized supply chain and manufacturing.

    And since we're dreaming, I think the next box should support HDMI-CEC. My blu-ray player supports so it would be relatively low-cost to implement.
     
  18. Mar 15, 2013 #98 of 423
    innocentfreak

    innocentfreak Active Member

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    Its not TCF if we don't derail every topic with some random conversation. ;)

    Hopefully they add CEC across the board. It always seemed odd not to have it but to have a remote option on the iPad since you still need the remote to control the TV.
     
  19. Mar 15, 2013 #99 of 423
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    I turn HDMi CEC off in all my devices that have it.
     
  20. Ichinisan

    Ichinisan New Member

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    What LAN interface did you use? From what I've heard, the wired Ethernet connection on TiVo Premiere is 100Mb/s. Basically, HDMI HEC would be just as fast as the direct-wired connection. I do expect that future TiVo models will all have gigabit to handle more simultaneous HD streams to more devices; especially now that TiVo Mini is available.

    Wireless has mixed results and can be unreliable. In an apartment like mine, a neighbor could connect wireless equipment at any time and start interfering with me or using the same channel. I've read that MoCA can also have mixed results for performance and reliability (though I'm sure it's much better than wireless). For cable modem users, the wiring at the MoCA injection point can be a complicated disaster.

    [​IMG]
     

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