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TiVo S3 remote won't learn - does it have ADD ?

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by HaloBox, Jul 11, 2007.

  1. HaloBox

    HaloBox New Member

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    Ok, I know it doesn't have attention deficit disorder. However, I have a HP MD5880n DLP HDTV and I can't get the S3 to learn from the HP remote.

    I don't see any HP TV's in the chart. Anyone have an idea how to make my S3 remote learn?

    Thanks!!!
     
  2. jrm01

    jrm01 New Member

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    Pittsburgh
  3. HaloBox

    HaloBox New Member

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    Yes, I have tried learning mode with the Tivo and HP remote. Nada. I also tried all of the Phillips codes. Nada.

    Anyone here actually have a HP DLP and a Tivo S3 ???

    Where was that thread reporting success ???
     
  4. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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  5. jrm01

    jrm01 New Member

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  6. HaloBox

    HaloBox New Member

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    Thanks all. I am going to give up on this. My HP is still on the original firmware and based on my readings on AVSForum, I run a significant risk updating the firmware.

    Since my HDTV is working very well, I'll just live with two remotes.

    Thanks for the help!!!
     
  7. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    Never give up...never surrender! ;)

    Quick question...and forgive me if it's a stupid one...but when you tried "teaching" your TiVo remote using your HP remote did it get anything...was it able to turn the TV on or off or change volume...anything?

    The reason I ask is that we have an Integra amp (high-end Onkyo) that has a discreet on/off management system...that is it has a separate on and off remote signal. (Hopefully that engineer is no longer working there. :rolleyes: ) We ended up having to teach our TiVo remote to turn the amp on using the second setting (our TV being the first setting) and off using the third setting...so when you press the TiVo on/off button it sends both signals. If the amp is off it turns on, ignoring the off signal and if it's on it turns off, ignoring the on signal. A bit complicated but it works.

    I didn't know if your HP TV might have something "special" like that. Just curious if you could get your TiVo remote to learn anything from the HP remote at all...sounds like you couldn't but thought I'd ask. :confused:
     
  8. T-Shee

    T-Shee Member

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    (Apologies to the OP for the slightly off-topic nature of this request, but it doesn't stray that far...)

    RiCHSADAMS: if you could post the procedure for adding the second and third codes to the TIVO S3 remote, it might help all of us who 1) didn't know you could do that, 2) those of us who have DISCREET "ON" and "OFF" codes for POWER in amps, a/v recv'rs, etc.

    (To clarify what a discreet code means, for those who might not know, it's simply a separate code for each operation, a code for 'ON' that is different from the code for 'OFF'. Most A/V rec'vrs use the same "toggle-switch", the same button for 'ON' and 'OFF', which is NOT DISCREET.)

    My older Yamaha RV series receiver has discreet ON/OFF codes, just like your INTEGRA. I'd guess other a/v units do the same, unfortunately.

    It would be the absolute "cherry on the cake" for some S3 owners who could then dispense with the dreaded "multiple remote shuffle"; I'd love to see only the Tivo Remote on the coffee table and none of the skateboard size universal remotes that I seem to need just to turn the rec'vr on and off. YIKES!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  9. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    What a nuisance discreet on/off is. I have yet to determine why they thought that was a good idea. :confused:

    Lucky for us the TiVo S3 or Glo remotes can contol up to three devices.

    My “theory” took a bit of chin rubbing but it works on the principle that the amp or receiver can only register/read one discreet signal at a time. If you send it two signals at the same time it will only act on one and that depends on its current state…on or off.

    If your TV info is already programmed into your TiVo remote, you'll probably want to perform a Global Remote Reset to clear out the current settings.

    The rest is actually part of "TiVo's Learning Feature instructions". Your "first device" will be your TV and you'll just need to use the second and third device feature to control your receiver, specifically:

    So on your TiVo remote simply program your TV as the "first device" (no volume, mute, etc.), program your receiver's "on" signal as well as volume and mute as your "second device" and program your receiver's "off" signal as your "third device".

    This way when you press TiVo's "TV Pwr" button it will send all three signals simultaneously:

    1) TV Power
    2) Receiver power on
    3) Receiver power off

    The TV will turn on (or off) and your receiver will only register one signal…if it’s off it will turn on and if it's on it will turn off.

    Note that if you get out of whack...your TV is on but your receiver is off or vice versa, you'll have to use an old remote to correct the situation. Or you could just walk over and push the appropriate power button. :D

    Hope that makes sense and helps…and enjoy the new real estate on your coffee table!

    P.S. Do you think this would be worth a post of it's own...perhaps in the S3 forum? I'm not sure how many people it would help, but it would have been nice to have had some instructions when I was looking.
     
  10. T-Shee

    T-Shee Member

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    Commendable job explaining this, Thanks! Excellent.

    Yes, I do think that it would help many S3 owners - I would think we tend to be the Tivo folks most likely to have other A/V equipment, and hence, addtional remotes, that could be programmed into the "TV pwr" button on the GLO. So post away. You'll could be uncluttering coffee tables all across America, lowering the divorce rate, raising the GNP. Okay, maybe not the GNP.

    (My Series 1 Sony remote could only handle 1 other device, which I used to for the "ON" command for the receiver. I still had to use another remote to turn it "OFF", so the second remote was hanging around the coffee table, collecting dust, for only 1 button press at the end of the day, so to speak.)

    Bye-bye second remote! And I may get SAF points - "Honey, what happened to that gigantic remote that was on the coffee table?" "Um... don't worry about, dear. I - ahem - programmed it out of existence. It's no longer necessary. Just use the Tivo remote for everything now."

    Thanks again.
     
  11. HaloBox

    HaloBox New Member

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    I only tried training it with the power button which is the first need. Like I said, it's really no big deal. Oh, and for those of you will all kinds of remotes, my wife found this cool remote holder. It's basically a wood box that holds them vertical in slots. It has a swivel base. Perfect size for 6-8 remotes. :eek:

    Thanks again :D
     
  12. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    ;)
    Aurgh! :confused: So when you used the learning mode did the TiVo remote activity light flash once to acknowledge the button press, and then remain lit or did the light blink 10 times very quickly indicating it didn’t (or won’t) learn the command?

    I'm also wondering if your TiVo remote might be defective. There's really no reason it shouldn't be able to learn your TV's remote signals. (You can actually teach it a ceiling fan's signal if you want.) Or perhaps there’s something wrong with it and it’s not sending or unable to send the learned signal to your TV.

    Did you try teaching it any other remote signals or was this a first? Or did you try teaching it the volume or mute commands?

    I know there isn't an HP code in TiVo’s list. They say to use Phillips but for grins you might try some of Sony’s codes as a lot of manufacturers are using theirs now.

    Another thought would be to make your TV "device 2" or "device 3" by using the instructions above. I don't know why that would work and not "device 1" but you never know.

    Is your TiVo remote set to an address other than the default (0)? I don't think it would have any effect, but if it's set to "1" or "2" you might try putting it back to "0". You can check this by going to your account settings screen and reading the remote address. Although you didn't mention if you had two TiVo's in the same room, these are instructions for resetting your remote to the default address if needed.

    Sorry for all of the questions, but I'm just dumbfounded as to why it won't learn your TV's signal...or perhaps why your TV won't respond to it. And I always refuse to let an inanimate object get the best of me! :mad:

    Please let us know if anything else worked or if you've decided to surrender...which I wouldn't blame you for if you did! ;)
     
  13. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    Yay! :up: Glad I could be of service. I'll have to put my thinking cap on and create a new posting. I think it might be good to have it out there for others using multiple remotes too.

    And hey...if I can save just one marriage...well, then... :D
     
  14. Francesco

    Francesco Summum Pontificem

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    Bump.

    Just got my Glo... thanks for the insight!

    With my Yamaha, I programmed TV Power on/off as device 1, the Yamaha "on" as 2, and "off" as 3 (volume and mute being separate). But the Yamaha saw the "off" command immediately after the "on" so I had to map the off to the "Input" button.
     
  15. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    Nice! BTW, have a drink on me at The House of Tricks when you're downtown! ;)
     
  16. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    It is all but required, or at worst highly desirable in a mixed vendor Integrated Home Theater system. An example is a system using a universal remote like one of the Harmony series from Logitech or an IP based IR controller. If a unit has a dual (or higher order) purpose button for any command, then there is no way to be certain what a control code sent to the unit will do. At the very least this will frequently leave the system in a non-operational state after a command macro is run. The TV might be on, for example, and the AVR off. It's not at all unusual for a series of discrete commands to be lost when running a macro due to an initial command failure early in the string of commands. For example, if the AVR was turned off instead of on, and a command was subsequently set to change the input to the DVD, the AVR will not only be off instead of on, but also be looking at the wrong input.

    In some cases, a truly bizarre set of conditions can be established, and on a complex system, it can take a while to figure out what is set to what, requiring the user to drop the (very expensive) universal remote and scramble to find all the discrete remotes in order to return the system to a state from which the programmed universal remote can effectively take control of the system again.

    Yes, discrete control commands are a bit more trouble for people who manually control their systems or have very simple systems covered by a limited number of vendors, and they require additional buttons* on what are probably already crowded remotes, but they are essential for highly integrated, universally controlled systems.

    *Note it is quite possible to design a remote with a single button that still controls systems which require multiple commands. The remote must simply be able to alternate codes when the button is pressed multiple times. The down side of this is if the unit being controlled misses a control code, the button will have to be pressed (at least) two more times in order to complete whatever job the user wanted done.
     
  17. richsadams

    richsadams Active Member

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    Yep, all makes sense, but it's still a pain to deal with. Now and then our Harmony will skip one or the other (or it may get laid down before that particular command was given) and I have to drag the original remote out...or...gasp!...walk over and manually turn it on or off. But I'd just as soon it were "normal". The newer Onkyo's and Integra's seem to have done away with it. Probably cost cutting but more convenient IMHO.
     
  18. lrhorer

    lrhorer Active Member

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    San...
    It's more along the lines of high end vs. low end, and whether a unit is expected to be used in a Home Theater environment, and of course individual engineering decisions. Both my Yamaha HTR-5790 AVR and my Optoma HD-81 projector implement discrete controls, but my Pioneer VSX-1015TX and Hitachi 62" DLP do not. The Yamaha and the Hitachi are both older than the Optoma or the Pioneer, with the Optoma being the newest and the Hitachi being the oldest.

    Note if all the commands are discrete, then in the event of one or more lost command codes, one may simply press the same command key again, and the system will right itself. With non-discrete codes, it won't. I would be happier if the Hitachi and especially the Pioneer employed discrete codes. It would make shutting off the TV while listening to music and then returning to watching TV much easier. As it is now, I have to shut off the TV, turn the AVR back on, listen to my music, turn off the AVR and turn the system back on to watch TV. With discrete codes, it would be 2 steps, rather than 4.
     

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