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Series 3 freezing and reboots

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by jon96cobra, Apr 12, 2014.

  1. D_vadout

    D_vadout New Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Hmmm...there's only one way to find out.
     
  2. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    semi-coastal NC
    I've never actually set a cat on fire or even considered doing so, but I figure burning cat fur is going to smell about the same as any other kind of hair does when burned, which is approximately awful.
     
  3. HerronScott

    HerronScott Well-Known Member

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    Jan 1, 2002
    Staunton, VA
    Run kitty run! :)

    Scott
     
  4. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    It occurred to me much later than it should have that perhaps none of us mentioned to D_vadout the need to clip off the excess lead length on the new caps after they're soldered in so as to avoid the risk of shorting to something.
     
  5. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Cox Cable...
    Those clippings also work good as trace repair jumpers. Funny, the odd things that enter my thoughts when I wake up in the middle of the night...

    Also, don't feel bad that you missed that one little thing. I came up with about a dozen that should have been pointed-out to a novice/first-timer. So, don't sweat just the one. :D
     
  6. D_vadout

    D_vadout New Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Yep. One step ahead of you Unitron. Per the videos that I watched I learned to clip the legs, pegs, whatever they're called so it won't short out the board.

    The beatings that I gave on the back of that board....I'm shocked my Tivo works.:p
    It's amazing what you can learn from watching soldering videos.

    Replacing all of them was a challenge. I realized the original caps weren't low ESR's.
    When my BIL(brother-in-law)saw how many needed to be changed he didn't want to do it. The bad thing about that is that he never said he didn't want to. I got the hint when he kept putting it off.

    Trying to get the caps off was the hardest. After that everything was a breeze. I was shocked at how easy that part was.
    Needless to say I'm glad I got a chance to teach myself on how to solder.

    Would I do this again?

    Heezie naw!
     
  7. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC

    If you ever have an LCD TV or PC monitor quit on you, search for the model number at lcdalternatives and see if they have a cap kit already made up for it.

    If they do, then that's a good indication that the problem with it is bad caps in the switching power supply, and now that you know how to replace them...

    You're going to be thoroughly dangerous by the time we get through with you.
     
  8. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Cox Cable...
    Unitron is right. I've had to replace the filter caps on two computer LCDs, and one TV over the past few years. Bad caps made it into CRT screens/TVs, and are still showing up. I could spend all day listing every device that just needed a few dollars worth of parts, and soldering skills.

    Some of them are even real major name brand name ones, or have been counterfeited so well, there's no telling the difference.

    The other problems with electrolytic caps are:

    1. They are only meant to last a few years in the first place (keep within their ratings).
    2. They can just dry-out over time, with no external signs.
    3. They can be 100% bad, and have no visible signs to indicate it.

    If in doubt, and lacking a capacitor tester, replace them. If they bulge, or leak, be glad you got a visual indicator at all. If one cap is bad, those of the same brand and rating, should all really be replaced (and others given scrutiny, over whether you just want to trust them).

    Consumer electronics devices will often just start operating oddly, or erratically, when caps don't hold-up. Sometimes, they seem fine until turned-off, and you go to turn them on again (and then nothing happens). So, if you have something that "doesn't like to turn back on", but otherwise works, you know what to suspect first.
     
  9. D_vadout

    D_vadout New Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Son I'm lethal. :cool:
     
  10. D_vadout

    D_vadout New Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Could you do the same for a computer monitor if it goes out?
     
  11. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    If it's an old style monitor, with a picture tube that has to warm up that makes the back of the monitor stick out and makes the whole thing very heavy, then it's probably too old to have gotten any of the "capacitor plague" capacitors when they built it, and whatever's wrong will be much more difficult to figure out and fix.

    But if it's a flat panel LCD monitor made from the mid '90s on, there's a very good chance that if it up and quits powering on, it's the same reason and solution as with your TiVo power supply.
     
  12. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Cox Cable...
    I've found bulged caps on old CRT TVs and monitors. Often it's just one cap, in the power-on relay circuit, where the cheapest and least reliable cap was used, likely to save money.

    I've also had monitors that refused to resume from standby, but would power-on if the power was pulled and restored. Same thing.

    I've also had a variety of devices that could only be powered-on by a remote. Same thing, bad cap in the circuit that receives the signal, and triggers a relay.

    Like I said, I could spend a day listing every scenario where one single cap was responsible for something being completely unable to power on, was hit-and-miss, or was otherwise not operating properly.

    In many/most of these cases, it was the only cap of that brand in the whole TV, and/or the only cap in the circuit involved.

    Big shock (sarcasm) that these brand caps I replaced were later the top offenders in more modern equipment as being "known to be suspect".

    In power supplies, it's never a good idea to only replace the caps that have visible signs. The rest have to pick up the slack, and will be stressed by doing so. This includes caps on other voltage rails, and ones upstream and downstream, in the circuits. Usually, with power supplies, the only one I don't mess with, unless it's easy to source and reasonably priced, is the very high voltage one(s) on the voltage doubling/tripling switching transistor(s). If a switching transistor fails, then it's a good idea to replace the transistor and the very high voltage caps (while taking proper safety precautions).
     
  13. D_vadout

    D_vadout New Member

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    Apr 14, 2014
    Hello people.
    I haven't forgot about this forum. I've been keeping an eye out on my Tivo making sure it's still ticking after I repaired it.
    It is.
    Had a huge thunderstorm last week which caused my power to go out for about 7.5 hours! It didn't do any damage although I did nearly burn down my kitchen by trying to use survival camping techniques that involved a homemade pot stove(made out of Pepsi cans) denatured alcohol and a camping stove from Walmart.
    I never repaired anything electrical in my life but managed to do so with my Tivo.
    Just don't invite me on a camping trip. Ever!
     
  14. unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    Glad to hear that both you and your TiVo are still hanging in there.

    :up:
     

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