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Series 3 - constant "Powering up" reboot cycle

Discussion in 'TiVo Series3 HDTV DVRs' started by Hank, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

    20,891
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    May 31, 2000
    Boston, MA
    I've had my S3 since they came out. It's been running like a champ.

    Until a couple of weeks ago, it started having problems booting up. I think on the third try it finally started up. But then the next day, it was stuck on "Powering Up..." screen. Several attempts to powerdown/restart were not successful.

    I've been around Tivos long enough to know when my hard drive failed. So I ordered a new HD upgrade from Weakknees, which arrived today. 5 minutes later it was installed.

    Same problem. Constant "powering up.." reboot cycle every 2-4 minutes or so.

    What next? Is this a repairable problem? This box has lifetime, and I'd really like to get it working to avoid "upgrading" to a Tivo Premier.

    Thanks.
     
  2. poppagene

    poppagene User

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    Dec 29, 2001
    while you've got the tivo open, do a visual inspection of the power supply. It's possible (likely) that one or more of the capacitors are bulging and in need of replacement. If you can handle basic soldering, this is something you can repair yourself.
     
  3. Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    May 31, 2000
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    Yeah, I found a few other threads. I can solder. One cap is slightly bulged. There are two of the same size that look like they're glued together with a yellow/white hard foam material, but the caps themselves look OK. Is it easier to just replace the entire PS?
     
  4. steve614

    steve614 what ru lookin at?

    10,722
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    May 1, 2006
    Dallas, TX
    Good luck.

    Are you going to replace all of the caps, or just the bad ones?

    I would recommend at least replacing all of the capacitors on the "output" side of the power supply.
     
  5. Sep 1, 2012 #6 of 11
    Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    I bought then all, except for the 2 small 470mf caps that was out of stock, and the huge 470mf 200v cap. They all looked ok. So I'm replacing all 9 others, a few of which are definitely bulging.
     
  6. Sep 1, 2012 #7 of 11
    unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    semi-coastal NC
    That cap rated at 200V is on the input side and only has to deal with full-wave rectified 60Hz, which looks like 120Hz, so it's probably just fine.

    It's the ones on the output side that have to deal with the switching frequencies in the kHz range that are subjected to stresses that cause the ones with bad electrolyte to fail.
     
  7. Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    May 31, 2000
    Boston, MA
    Caps finally received today, no thanks to really slow shipping from Mouser.

    But all 9 caps replaced, and my S3 is humming along swimmingly with the old hard drive.

    The hardest part was re-opening up the PCB holes once I removed the caps. I think my soldering iron just wasn't hot enough, and it took a lot longer to soften the solder on the board. I dabbed a tiny bit of my own solder to help with the heat transfer, and that worked, but also filled up the empty holes. A little tricky, but I got them all in.

    Thanks for the info/help.
     
  8. unitron

    unitron Active Member

    16,390
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    Apr 28, 2006
    semi-coastal NC
    When dealing with large areas of copper like on the bottom of the power supply board, sometimes a soldering gun is better than a soldering iron.

    (but of course one often has to make do with what one has on hand)


    In soldering, always remember, heat up the work (the stuff to be soldered) and let it melt the solder.

    In unsoldering, introducing some more solder, along with some of its rosin core flux, can help get the original to melt.


    You can sometimes open up those holes by heating them and then poking with a sewing needle.
     
  9. Hank

    Hank AC•FTW TCF Club

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    May 31, 2000
    Boston, MA
    I was using one of the long leads on a new cap to help melt the solder in the holes. I do have a de-soldering bulb somewhere, but I was too lazy to go look for it.
     
  10. HerronScott

    HerronScott Well-Known Member

    2,791
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    Jan 1, 2002
    Staunton, VA
    I was going to recommend either a desoldering pump or desoldering wick.

    Scott
     

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