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NBC kills off Parks & Rec, 30 Rock and Community

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Mikeyis4dcats, May 9, 2012.

  1. May 11, 2012 #61 of 122
    Aniketos

    Aniketos New Member

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  2. May 11, 2012 #62 of 122
    YCantAngieRead

    YCantAngieRead Not Entirely Current

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    Parks and Rec was simply blah until they brought in Rob Lowe and...I'm blanking on his name. The last few seasons have been magic.

    And even Tiny Fey admits the 30 Rock pilot wasn't very good.
     
  3. May 11, 2012 #63 of 122
    TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

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    They also got away from the single-note story arc of the park she was trying to build and made the story lines more flexible, so we can get Leslie and characters into a lot of different things. Open it up for better comedy.
     
  4. May 11, 2012 #64 of 122
    DreadPirateRob

    DreadPirateRob Seriously?

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    I disagree, at least somewhat. Parks was astoundingly good pretty much from the minute S2 started, and Chris & Ben didn't come in until the end of S2 (second to last ep or thereabouts).

    The first season was dreadful, but thankfully it was only 6 eps or so, and I only stuck with it because the creators and the cast were so good that it had to get better. And I'm glad I did. S2/S3 is probably the strongest consecutive seasons that a sitcom has ever put together, and while I don't think S4 was quite as good, it was still better than just about everything else on TV.
     
  5. May 11, 2012 #65 of 122
    DreadPirateRob

    DreadPirateRob Seriously?

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    It was only a single-note arc because the first season only lasted for 6 eps. The arc was no more or less short (or single-note) than any other arc the show has done, but since it took the entire (abbreviated) first season and the first couple of eps from the second season, it seemed longer than it was. Heck, this season had one main arc that lasted for the entire season.

    No, the only real difference is that they fundamentally changed Leslie. Pretty much everything else you can chalk up to getting to know the characters as they got more and more screen time.
     
  6. May 11, 2012 #66 of 122
    DreadPirateRob

    DreadPirateRob Seriously?

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  7. May 11, 2012 #67 of 122
    max99

    max99 Member

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  8. May 11, 2012 #68 of 122
    Hoffer

    Hoffer Captain Chaos

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  9. May 11, 2012 #69 of 122
    DreadPirateRob

    DreadPirateRob Seriously?

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  10. May 11, 2012 #70 of 122
    busyba

    busyba The Funcooker

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  11. May 11, 2012 #71 of 122
    Boston Fan

    Boston Fan Active Member

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    Imagine how many episodes would they have ordered if they hadn't killed it off!
     
  12. May 11, 2012 #72 of 122
    ElJay

    ElJay Active Member

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    I agree... This show has been great. Somewhere towards the end of the second season I got tired of it, though I kept recording and saved up about a year and a half of episodes. A couple of months ago I started watching them all (I'm caught up now) and it has been fantastic.
     
  13. May 11, 2012 #73 of 122
    YCantAngieRead

    YCantAngieRead Not Entirely Current

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    YESSSS!!!

    Still the last season, though?
     
  14. May 11, 2012 #74 of 122
    Fleegle

    Fleegle Chef-In-Training

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    I agree, NBC is doing the excat opposite of "killing off" these shows. They announced a RENEWAL if the shows for the next season. They have ordered 13 episodes each, but that doesn't mean it's being killed off. I'm sure they have the option for a pickup on the back 9.

    For Chuck's 4th season, (I think), NBC renewed for 13 episodes, then ordered an additional 11 before midseason.

    Thread title fail.
     
  15. May 11, 2012 #75 of 122
    Sparty99

    Sparty99 Well-Known Member

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    Why doesn't network television understand that 13 episodes is pretty much ideal for a quality season? Anything over that is filling in story lines with ridiculous plots and it ruins the quality of the show. I've never watched P&R but I like 30 Rock and Community (although I won't necessarily be sad when they're gone).

    I readily admit that network TV can't compete with cable networks when it comes to what they can get past standards & practices, but the best thing cable TV has come up with is the 13-episode season.
     
  16. May 11, 2012 #76 of 122
    Boston Fan

    Boston Fan Active Member

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    Other than the OP's erroneous thread title, I haven't seen anything suggesting it the last season for Parks & Rec.

    As noted earlier, Parks & Rec has been picked up for a full 22 episodes. Rumors of its demise have been completely imagined by the OP.
     
  17. May 11, 2012 #77 of 122
    TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

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  18. May 11, 2012 #78 of 122
    That Don Guy

    That Don Guy Now with more GB

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    Now that P&R has been picked up for 22 episodes instead of 13, that would give it 90 - add "plenty for syndication, plus it's a multiple of 5 which makes it easier to sell internationally" to the rumored reasons it wouldn't go past next season...
     
  19. May 11, 2012 #79 of 122
    mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    I disagree with this *UNLESS* you make (at least) 2 shows per year for each timeslot (+ specials/awards shows/etc.)

    In other words, if we went down to 13 episodes being typical (instead of low 20s-24), we'd have even MORE reruns of shows.
     
  20. May 11, 2012 #80 of 122
    DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give em Hell, Devils

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    It's all about the money. Network TV has figured out that 22 episodes is the financial sweet spot. More episodes and the cast/crew feel overworked and the license fees are excessive. Fewer episodes and the network isn't getting its money's worth and it doesn't have enough content to fill its timeslots. Also, it's much cheaper to produce 22 episodes of one show per year than it is to produce 13 episodes each of two shows.

    Remember, the network doesn't really care that much about whether the story/plot is perfect. If there are some filler episodes, that's no big deal. It's all about the money, and the advertisers pay just as much for filler episodes as they do for substantive episodes.
     

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