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MoCA / Ethernet network mix question

Discussion in 'TiVo Help Center' started by A2JetGuy, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. Oct 1, 2013 #1 of 10
    A2JetGuy

    A2JetGuy Member

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    Jan 23, 2013
    I'm planning my new home TiVo set-up, and have a networking question. I've looked at other threads, but haven't quite found the answer.

    This part seems straightforward... OTA coax directly from antenna to Roamio. Nothing else is on that coax down-lead, just a direct connection. Roamio is then connected to home network via Ethernet hard wire which will connect to two other TiVo Minis. So far, this seems like the proper set-up.

    The question I have is in regard to adding a third TiVo Mini in a part of the house that does not have an Ethernet hard wire but does have a coax that is completely isolated from the antenna down-lead coax.

    Is it possible (and is this how MoCA works), to connect the home network to a MoCA adaptor (via Ethernet cable) then send the signal to the third Mini via the direct coax cable that goes to that room? Again, the antenna down-lead coax and this MoCA coax connection to the third Mini are in no way connected.

    Essentially, in summary: Roamio and two Minis connected to network via Ethernet cable, third Mini connected to network via its own MoCA coax.
     
  2. Oct 1, 2013 #2 of 10
    hanlan

    hanlan New Member

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    Sep 26, 2013
    The roamio plus/pro will act as a moca bridge (after you enable it) for the 2 mini on the same coax. But you need to connect the antenna coax to the isolated coax on the third mini for moca to work on it.
     
  3. Oct 1, 2013 #3 of 10
    A2JetGuy

    A2JetGuy Member

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Thanks, generally that's probably true, however...

    I'm OTA from an antenna, so the Plus and the Pro are not an option. I can only use the basic Roamio, so there's no MoCA bridge to enable.

    As I stated, the two Minis are connected via Ethernet cable, not coax, so they are not networked using MoCA.

    Connecting the antenna down lead coax to the third room coax is not an option. In addition to that, I'm OTA deep-fringe. The additional 3db loss by adding even a single splitter to the antenna down-lead causes me to lose a few channels.

    So, can a home TiVo network successfully include a Roamio Basic and two Minis connected via Ethernet, and one Mini connected via MoCA adaptor and coax?
     
  4. Oct 1, 2013 #4 of 10
    BigJimOutlaw

    BigJimOutlaw Active Member

    2,779
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    Mar 21, 2004
    The Mini on the coax needs to be able to physically reach a moca adapter connected to the modem/router on the same network as the other Tivo devices, otherwise the Mini wouldn't have a network connection.

    If the Mini isn't too far away from the router, you might consider trying a wireless N bridge with the Mini. If your network is fast/robust enough (802.11n strongly preferred) it may work. Generally this isn't "supported" by Tivo since they want you to use a wired connection, but there are folks that run it this way (at their own risk).
     
  5. Oct 1, 2013 #5 of 10
    socrplyr

    socrplyr Active Member

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    Jul 19, 2006
    This setup is completely possible:
    Antenna -Coax1-> Roamio -CopperEthernet1-> Router -CopperEthernet2-> MoCA Bridge/Adapter -Coax2-> Mini
    Of coarse you can also have the other two Mini's directly off the Router as well. Down the road you can also add them to your Coax2 via splitters if you choose to. You wouldn't need a second MoCA Bridge as long as you connect up the Coax.

    Tivo is also one of the cheaper places to get your MoCA Bridge from:
    https://www.tivo.com/shop/detail/moca
    $50 + $8.50 shipping + tax
     
  6. Oct 1, 2013 #6 of 10
    dianebrat

    dianebrat I refuse to accept your reality TCF Club

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    Jul 6, 2002
    boston'ish
    Also consider powerline networking as an option, I've been very pleased with it in my new home and have a convoluted setup that has so far been working.

    Verizon FiOS router in the basement with MoCA enabled and 1 port going to a PNA.
    MoCA feeds the media rack on the the first floor with a Premiere XL that acts as a bridge.
    Premiere XL feeds an ethernet switch for 8 other devices in the living room.

    PNA adapters are in the 2nd floor bedroom for the Mini, and 2nd floor office for my PC.
    (no ethernet or cable outlets up on the 2nd floor and I wasn't going to add them)

    So far a few small hiccups, but it's been surprisingly stable.
     
  7. Oct 1, 2013 #7 of 10
    A2JetGuy

    A2JetGuy Member

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    Jan 23, 2013
    Wow... These are GREAT ideas!

    BigJimOutlaw... The Mini on the coax will physically reach, so it may work. Also, I hadn't even considered a wireless bridge. My wifi is an Apple AirPort Extreme; I may be able to bridge an Apple AirPort Express... It's so crazy, it just might work!

    Scorplyr... I think you and I are describing the same set up, in which case, prognosis Good!

    Dianebrat... Powerline networking wasn't even on my radar, so I hadn't considered that either. Interesting to hear that it is so stable. This is one that I'll have to educate myself about. It may solve a few other problems for me too!

    Thanks again, everyone, for thinking outside the box on this one!
     
  8. Oct 1, 2013 #8 of 10
    socrplyr

    socrplyr Active Member

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    Jul 19, 2006
    Yes I believe I was describing it. It is also the method I would go with if I were you.

    I have used Powerline for years without too much issues, until I tried a Mini via my 85Mbps units (reviews show they typically give ~10Mbps throughput). They just couldn't provide enough throughput for HD channels (SD worked fine). Until I can get my cable run fixed, I am borrowing my parents' 200Mbps units (reviews show these ones give ~25Mbps throughput typically). They seem to work fine. If you decide to invest in Powerline units, I would definitely go for the 500Mbps ones to be sure that there is plenty of room there if your powerlines aren't that good. If you use them also make sure you do not plug them into a surge protector. They do make strips without surge protectors, extension cables, or just plug it into the wall directly. My performance was absolutely atrocious when I had it plugged in through my surge protector strips.
    Overall, I have found my units to be consistent and reliable, they just didn't get near the advertised speeds. Seems eerily familiar to Wifi when you aren't parked right next to the access point.
     
  9. Oct 1, 2013 #9 of 10
    socrplyr

    socrplyr Active Member

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    Jul 19, 2006
    Sounds equivalent to my current setup up. What speed Powerline adapters do you have?
     
  10. dianebrat

    dianebrat I refuse to accept your reality TCF Club

    10,123
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    Jul 6, 2002
    boston'ish
    500 Mbps, my old house was GB copper, so I didn't want to drop it too far in the new house.
     

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