1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

London Olympics TV Coverage Thread

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by Marco, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. mattack

    mattack Active Member

    20,734
    4
    Apr 9, 2001
    sunnyvale
    So, I saw a brief mention of there being a DVD of the opening ceremony. (I still am vaguely interested in a DVD of the Beijing Opening Ceremony.. that was literally awesome.)

    I wonder if they'll do one of the closing ceremony.. including the bits we missed! Skip the lip syncers, and I'd pay a couple of bucks for the performances. (I realize a DVD would actually be more than that.. But they'd get SOME money out of me for a cheap one.)

    Hmm, I see the Beijing opening ceremonies DVD for $16.44 on ebay.. I wonder if those are legit. Still, that's more than I'd pay.
     
  2. mattack

    mattack Active Member

    20,734
    4
    Apr 9, 2001
    sunnyvale
    They showed WAY FEWER than previous Olympics.
     
  3. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

    7,870
    14
    Jan 4, 2002
    Columbia, MD
    Yeah. Cause more choices and more sports and more events doesn't add up to more viewers. That's why they don't own a bunch of cable stations that broadcast regular programming during prime time.

    And why espn never runs games on one than more channel.

    What makes sense for every day makes even more sense for the olympics.

    Once again. NBC devised a plan that was based on old technology and old patterns. How do you get fewer viewers with more channels.
     
  4. TonyD79

    TonyD79 Active Member

    7,870
    14
    Jan 4, 2002
    Columbia, MD
    They did. But they showed way more commercials.
     
  5. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

    40,089
    43
    Mar 10, 2003
    New Jersey
    Well that one is easy, unfortunately. Cut the Brokaw piece. Not sports related, and it lasted an hour. There were other places they could have put that piece. How about show one less round of diving for instance? A problem I had with NBC's coverage (which I've mostly defended) Is I felt they were a bit too rigid in their scheduling. Sometimes you have to change things up a bit. Volleyball match compelling? Cut out some of another event. And so forth. I know it's tough, as you say that if someone tunes in to see an event and it's preempted they are going to be upset.
     
  6. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

    40,089
    43
    Mar 10, 2003
    New Jersey
    I'm sure they didn't count on me flipping to the Yankee game every commercial break and sometimes sticking with it too :)
     
  7. Steveknj

    Steveknj Lost in New Joisey

    40,089
    43
    Mar 10, 2003
    New Jersey
    See, I don't think it was NBC that devised that plan, but advertisers that are still stuck on the old plans. They still pay A LOT more for broadcast ads than they do for cable. I don't think the networks push it as much because they get a subscriber fee for their cable outlets which subsidizes ad revenues on cable (I know there's been battles for fees for broadcast networks now, but I'm still not sure they get paid the same way). I'd bet that ad rates for NBC are probably double that of NBCSN or MSNBC, even for the Olympics. And that's mostly because that's what advertisers pay.

    Even during regular primetime programming, how often does any cable channel beat the broadcast nets in ratings? Maybe MNF does, but probably not much else. There's still some justification in the old way, even though I agree, it's becoming increasingly antiquated.

    Again, weren't ALL event streamed live on the internet?
     
  8. BrettStah

    BrettStah Well-Known Member TCF Club

    23,017
    223
    Nov 12, 2000
    San Antonio
    Are ad rates lower for cable, or are the ratings on cable typically lower for cable, leading to lower rates? In other words, if Show A is on NBC, and Show B is on NBCSN, and the ratings are identical, would the rates charged for ads be different?
     
  9. waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

    12,049
    36
    Nov 9, 2002
    Seven...
    +1

    Clearly they don't get social media yet either. Their reports on what celebrities were tweeting were ridiculous. This would make great fodder for an SNL skit.
     
  10. DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give em Hell, Devils

    47,714
    136
    Apr 16, 2003
    Arizona
    NBC owns multiple channels because it's an inevitability that the audience will be fractured, and they want to capture more of the segments. ESPN knows not everyone wants to watch the same game, and thus offers additional choices.

    But the Olympics are different. They come along once every four years. The broadcast rights cost a fortune. NBC knows that in order to recoup its expenses and maximize its revenue on this, they have to funnel as many viewers as possible into one primetime telecast. If they fragment the Olympic viewership themselves, and encourage people to channel surf, there's no way they end up with the same number of viewers.

    NBC devised a plan that's based on the viewing habits of the masses, and the masses still act as if they have old technology. The last figures I saw showed that less than half the US had DVRs, and probably much fewer than that use them properly. We still use hit shows to launch new shows, because the "lead-in" is very valuable. We still see from ratings that on nights when a primetime program gets big ratings, the corresponding late-night show on that same station gets a bump. People still tend to turn their TVs on and leave them on a specific channel. NBC knows this, and this is what they based their programming and revenue decisions on. Just because a few technically savvy people don't like it, doesn't mean it wasn't the best business decision they could have made.
     
  11. mrdbdigital

    mrdbdigital The TBS Archives TCF Club

    3,157
    3
    Feb 2, 2004
    Moultrie, GA
    The Olympics come along every 2 years. You've forgotten NBC also uses the same coverage techniques for the Winter Olympics.
     
  12. laria

    laria Librocubicularist

    16,466
    20
    Sep 7, 2000
    Seacoast, NH
    Technically, every 1.5 and 2.5 years. ;)
     
  13. DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give em Hell, Devils

    47,714
    136
    Apr 16, 2003
    Arizona
    Right, but the economics of the Summer Games are much bigger than the Winter Games, and so for purposes of this debate, the Summer Games only happen every four years.
     
  14. cherry ghost

    cherry ghost Active Member

    5,276
    5
    Sep 13, 2005
    Chicago
    Article on Comcast/NBC winning the bid for 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020

    http://www.nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/43311618


    since that was written, Rome has withdrawn it's bid for 2020 and the finalists are Istanbul, Tokyo, and Madrid.
     
  15. laria

    laria Librocubicularist

    16,466
    20
    Sep 7, 2000
    Seacoast, NH
    I hope it's not Istanbul, because then I will be singing "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)" for 4 years every time I hear/see news about it.

    Doot doo doo... doot doo dee doo dee doo...
     
  16. jsmeeker

    jsmeeker Notable Member TCF Club

    103,936
    164
    Apr 2, 2001
    Dallas
    Go Tokyo!!
     
  17. aindik

    aindik Well-Known Member

    35,116
    71
    Jan 23, 2002
    Philadelphia...
    Madrid - 6 hours ahead of east coast U.S. time
    Istanbul - 7 hours ahead
    Tokyo - 13 hours ahead

    Of the 3, Tokyo is the best option for live events during prime time. 8 p.m. ET will be 9 a.m. Tokyo time.

    OTOH, there won't be any live events during the work day from a Tokyo Olympics.
     
  18. cherry ghost

    cherry ghost Active Member

    5,276
    5
    Sep 13, 2005
    Chicago
    It'll be interesting to see what they do with Rio and the West Coast. If evening sessions are shown live across all US time zones, that would mean finishing around 7-8 on the West Coast versus 10-11 in the East.
     
  19. DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give em Hell, Devils

    47,714
    136
    Apr 16, 2003
    Arizona
    I can't imagine that NBC wouldn't be showing the Olympics during the normal primetime hours on the west coast. Which means they'd have to show them once live and then again immediately afterward on a delay. I can't imagin that NBC would be interested in cannibalizing the west coast viewership by airing the same programming at 5 pm PT and then again at 8 pm PT. That would fracture the audience and diminish the viewership and it would also encourage viewers to record the earlier telecast and then watch the recording during the later hours. Both of those options results in less advertising revenue for NBC.
     
  20. DevdogAZ

    DevdogAZ Give em Hell, Devils

    47,714
    136
    Apr 16, 2003
    Arizona
    I think it will be nearly impossible for Tokyo to win the 2020 Games, since the 2018 Games were awarded to South Korea. The IOC generally likes to move the games to a different region each time, as much as possible, and not return to a region for several years. Since the Summer and Winter Games went to a staggered schedule, the hosting has been as follows:

    1992 Europe (Albertville)
    1992 Europe (Barcelona)
    1994 Europe (Lillehammer)
    1996 North America (Atlanta)
    1998 Asia (Nagano)
    2000 Australia (Sydney)
    2002 North America (Salt Lake City)
    2004 Europe (Athens)
    2006 Europe (Torino)
    2008 Asia (Beijing)
    2010 North America (Vancouver)
    2012 Europe (London)
    2014 Europe (Sochi)
    2016 South America (Rio)
    2018 Asia (Pyongchang)
    2020 ?

    This means that Istanbul and Madrid are the only real contenders for 2020, and it's kind of surprising since they're both in the same basic region as London, and that will only be eight years after London. Since 1988 (24 years), North America has only hosted three Games (1996 ATL, 2002 SLC, 2010 VAN). By 2020, that will be three games in 32 years. In that same 24 years, Europe has hosted 6 times, and if Madrid or Istanbul win, it will be 8 times in 32 years by 2020.

    I'd think it would definitely be North America's turn again by 2020 and for sure by 2022/4.

    Edit: After including the list of the host regions, it appears that Europe has been allowed to double up a couple times since 1992. So maybe the IOC won't have an issue with back-to-back games in Asia.
     

Share This Page