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Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath

Discussion in 'Season Pass Alerts' started by sharkster, Nov 27, 2016.

  1. sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member

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    In case anybody else is interested, this follows the one Special episode (still more airings, including same day as this premiere, in case you haven't caught it yet) on the A&E channel, Tuesday, November 29, 2016.

    This will be a limited series, but I don't know how many episodes.

    Looks interesting, as it's not just all about her, but interviews with many others about their experiences with Scientology. I like Leah Remini, so it has that value for me but also it's interesting to hear all the experiences of others with this - uh, thing. ;)
     
  2. JoeKustra

    JoeKustra Cable only TCF Club

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    Ashland, PA...
    Wiki says 8 episodes.
     
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  3. sharkster

    sharkster Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Joe. You're always a wealth of information. :)
     
  4. DaveBogart

    DaveBogart Active Member

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    Having just binge watched 5 episodes of this I have to wonder what sort of metal disorder does a person have to be afflicted with to join Scientology and not only join it but to stay in it.
     
  5. sinanju

    sinanju Member

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    One could ask that question of just about any religion. If I told you I knew of a cult where female clerics were made to vow chastity, shave their heads, and then marry their dead god, you would think that sounds pretty darned culty. Then again, it's just a negative way of describing the process of becoming a Catholic nun. It depends on what you think makes a cult a cult. Clearly, just being weird isn't it.

    I see cults as different than mainstream religions in that one is generally asked to (1) cut ties with friends and family outside the cult and (2) pay to receive "the word". Sure, churches pass around the collection plate, but you're not actually required to put any money in to hear the sermon. But, both of those features of cults make the member dependent on the cult for social connection an well-being. Thats why people stay in, even when the experience can be profoundly negative... the members think the alternative -- essentially being cast out into the void -- is worse.
     
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  6. Worf

    Worf Active Member

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    Religions also generally will spread their word for free - if you go into any Church, Temple or Mosque and ask about their religion, they'll happily provide you with lots of learning materials and if you ask nicely, a copy of their religious text, too (Bible, Koran, etc).

    Not so with Scientology - you want to read what it's about? Pay first - they'll sell you the text for $50 so you can learn all about it.

    As for how people get caught up, well, you just have to be a low point in your life. Perhaps a parent died, or ran away, or some other thing. They will come about and coach you into feeling better. From there is where the real brainwashing starts because as part of making you feel better, they'll place the blame for your troubles on the cause of them - say your parents, so you'll want to spend less and less time with them and more time with those who "care".

    This is not to say that mainstream religions haven't done evil things in the past. I mean there's a very fine line - and any religion with a long history (Islam, Christianity, etc) will at one point have met the definition of a cult too.
     
  7. Chris Gerhard

    Chris Gerhard Well-Known Member

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    It would be easy for me or you to consider anybody that believes such nonsense as mentally ill but as far as I know, the psychiatry profession doesn't recognize delusions as a result of religious beliefs a mental illness, no matter how absurd. Scientology would lose me, and I would assume most people, with the Lord Xenu, thetan, and E-meter science fiction nonsense. How could anybody be stupid enough to believe that?
     
  8. sinanju

    sinanju Member

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    Catholics (at the risk of picking on Catholics... I don't mean to) believe ritualized cannibalism, amongst other things, enables them to live forever. Go fig.
     
  9. Worf

    Worf Active Member

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    That's the thing, you don't learn about that stuff until you're "in". Scientology recruits people by helping them. And when you're feeling down, Scientology is there to offer you ways to understand why the world is as it is. Once you're given the platitudes that it's not your fault you and your girlfriend split up, but merely your girlfriend was simply incompatible with your position on the Bridge, well, things feel better. And then they throw in the community part and support and you begin to believe in it. Then they bring on the B-rate sci-fi.

    L. Ron Hubbard was, after all, a B-rate sci-fi author struggling to make a living. Until a bar bet got him to put enough jibberish together to make people feel better about themselves and follow him. You put enough platitudes together and make the reader feel like they belong in your organization, and they'll join.

    All you need to do is speak to those who feel disenfranchised and then make platitudes and other stuff so they follow you, while trying to disenfranchise others so they join you as well.
     

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