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Jeopardy: Just Noticed This

Discussion in 'Now Playing - TV Show Talk' started by waynomo, Jun 3, 2013.

  1. Jul 5, 2013 #41 of 866
    bryhamm

    bryhamm randomize

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    But if 1st and 2nd both bet small and get it right, then 2nd doesn't overtake 1st. It's not as simple as you make it out to be. 1st has to consider that 2nd bet everything, thus he/she would have to plan on making sure that he/she bet enough to maintain the lead if both of them got it right. You are only looking at it from the pov of both of them missing it.
     
  2. Jul 5, 2013 #42 of 866
    bryhamm

    bryhamm randomize

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    OK, so I went back to your original strategy. I get where you are coming from. But, it seems like you are giving equal weighting to each of the 4 scenarios above. I am guessing (purely a guess) that A happens more often (both right). In this case, ONE needs to make sure to bet enough to cover an all-in bet by TWO.

    and when you say this phrase:

    So whaddaya know--"b" happened and Two lost with a stupid all-in bet. And Three ended up winning!

    It sounds like you are saying "duh". Well, what if A had happened? Then he would have looked like a genius.

    I don't think it is as cut and dried as you make it sound. It becomes a lot of "wine in front of me". One, has the think that two is smart and thus will only wager a little bit. Two, has to think that one is smart and will deduce that two will wager small and thus one will wager small ... so two will wager larger to counter this. But one has already thought of this and will thus wager large to cover this. But two ... you get the picture.
     
  3. Jul 6, 2013 #43 of 866
    astrohip

    astrohip Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    I am not referring to how ONE should bet, which is what you are talking about here. I am *only* referring to the TWO bet. What ONE should bet is also well-known, and followed 90%+ of the time.

    And whether the results are weighted or not doesn't matter. I already said if "A" happens TWO will lose. Same with "C". It's only B & D where betting strategy comes into play. And in "D", any reasonable bet wins. But under "B", you will only win if follow the universally accepted practice I originally described. There is an infinitesimally remote downside, versus a guaranteed upside.

    All your permutations about who bets bigger or smaller don't matter, unless someone bets arky-darky, with no reason at all. That does happen on occasion (I think it happened Wed of this week), but honestly, it's so rare to see a 1st place person bet non-standard, that to try to figure that into your bet becomes, well... it's the endless loop you describe.:D
     
  4. Jul 7, 2013 #44 of 866
    spartanstew

    spartanstew Thanks 4 the Update

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    Which is why 1st shouldn't bet small.

    Yes, it is.

    Correct.

    No, he's not. The betting strategy is the same regardless.
     
  5. Jul 7, 2013 #45 of 866
    Tracy

    Tracy Truly TCF Club

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    My husband was on Jeopardy but it was 19 years ago. They had consultants helping them figure out their final bets at that time.
     
  6. Jul 8, 2013 #46 of 866
    mattack

    mattack Active Member

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    ok, I heard someone else mention 'consultants' on jeopardy too.. IIRC, it was one of the "Doug Loves Movies" podcasts where they were ranting about Jeopardy! wagering!
     
  7. Jul 13, 2013 #47 of 866
    waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    I was a little disturbed by Final Jeopardy this evening.

    The category was Video Game History. The question was,

    "The title princess of this game, which launched a best-selling franchise was named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife."

    I think the way it is worded is ambiguous. Do they want the name of the princess or the name of the game. I am year's away from grammar class. To me either could be right. I can see how the name of the game might be a bit more correct perhaps, but I can still read it the other way.

    Two of the contestants wrote down "What is Zelda" and where judged incorrect. The correct answer was "What is The Legend of Zelda."

    Please, grammar police, please help!
     
  8. Jul 13, 2013 #48 of 866
    astrohip

    astrohip Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    FJ will always make a reference to what they are looking for. In this case. see the bold red part. THIS GAME. You need to give the name of the game.

    This happens with some regularity. A contestant will write down something that is part of the question, but is not the exact part they are looking for.
     
  9. Jul 13, 2013 #49 of 866
    LoadStar

    LoadStar LOAD"*",8,1

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    "This game" is the key part. They want the name of the game, not the princess.

    Still, for clarity sake, the answer would have been better worded "It is the game that launched a best-selling franchise whose title princess was named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife."
     
  10. Jul 13, 2013 #50 of 866
    waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    Much better said!

    I can still read the original as wanting the name of the princess of the game. The princess of this game is Xxxxx.
     
  11. Jul 13, 2013 #51 of 866
    trainman

    trainman Nice to see you

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    I don't like "franchise whose," since a franchise isn't a "who." But more importantly, that "it is" at the beginning isn't how they write "Jeopardy!" clues; their standard style would be more like "This game, which launched a best-selling franchise, featured a title princess named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife."

    But I feel like that's a bit more awkward than the original -- "The title princess of this game, which launched a best-selling franchise, was named for F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife" -- mainly because she was the title princess, so of course she was "featured."

    I also want to note that without having to come up with the title of the game, the question becomes "name F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife," which isn't Final Jeopardy!-level information, it's more like top-to-middle-board in the first round.
     
  12. Jul 13, 2013 #52 of 866
    doom1701

    doom1701 Time for a new Title

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  13. Jul 13, 2013 #53 of 866
    astrohip

    astrohip Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    I agree. The fact that all three came up with Zelda (and probably quickly) tells you it was too easy. That two of three answered incorrectly, but the same way, tells you it was worded awkwardly. A true J aficionado would catch it, but the average player wouldn't (and didn't).
     
  14. Jul 14, 2013 #54 of 866
    busyba

    busyba The Funcooker

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    I've always wondered if it matters if the "question" answer makes any sense, just as long as you answer in the form of a question.

    For instance:

    "This person played Chandler on Friends"
    "When is Matthew Perry?"

    or

    "This is the capital of New York"
    "How is Albany?"


    I think it would be funny to play the whole game forming your responses like that. :)
     
  15. Jul 14, 2013 #55 of 866
    busyba

    busyba The Funcooker

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    I was watching that episode. As soon as I read the clue, I said to myself, "Zelda.... no, The Legend of Zelda!" and realized that "Zelda" would probably be considered wrong before they even got to the contestants.
     
  16. Jul 14, 2013 #56 of 866
    MarkofT

    MarkofT ****

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    I wonder if the contestants were confused by the question or the fact that most people refer to the game as simply "Zelda"?

    The question isn't ambiguous to me due to the words "this game" and the fact that I read that in Trebek's voice and he would have emphasized those words when reading it.
     
  17. Jul 14, 2013 #57 of 866
    waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    I think ultimately you Jeopardy experts are correct.

    My problem is that the answer should not be ambiguous. In my analysis, either answer could be correct.

    I don't recall seeing anything like this before in FJ. In regular/double I have seen this. For final, sure make the question hard, but I don't think it should be so nuanced.
     
  18. Jul 14, 2013 #58 of 866
    busyba

    busyba The Funcooker

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    The funniest (to me) FJ happened about a month or two ago. The clue was something about "his diary entry" of April <something> 1945, read <something about having no regrets despite it all or something like that>.

    I had absolutely no idea, but based on the date, I guessed Hitler.

    They go to the third place contestant and she guessed Hitler, and Alex says "no... not even close." :eek:

    I was like, "whoa! Dick move Alex!" :)

    To his credit though, after they did the wager/total reveal, Alex offered a quick "sorry about that" before moving on to the next contestants.

    The really funny part was that the other two guys also guessed Hitler. :)

    I think the correct answer was Harry Truman.
     
  19. Jul 14, 2013 #59 of 866
    waynomo

    waynomo My One Time TCF Club

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    I just re-watched Friday's FJ question again.

    Trebak did emphasize "this" when reading the question. It was still a pretty subtle emphasis, but I guess that makes the difference in Jeopardy.
     
  20. Jul 14, 2013 #60 of 866
    astrohip

    astrohip Well-Known Member TCF Club

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    Just to be picky, the verbal emphasis has nothing to do with the correct answer. The wording of the clue, "this game", is all any contestant needed to give the proper answer.

    Trebek's emphasis may be to help the players, but one can play Jeopardy with the sound off and still solve every clue.

    Well... except for the audio clues.:D
     

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