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How Chromecast Could Jumpstart TiVo’s Retail Ambitions

Discussion in 'TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion' started by sbiller, Jul 26, 2013.

  1. sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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  2. bradleys

    bradleys It'll be fine....

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    I love how Dave always opens these windows for conversation. I do like this idea - an app on TiVo that would catch Chromecast streams.

    It really opens the opportunity to be part of a growing ecosystem instead of a completely closed environment.
     
  3. aadam101

    aadam101 Tell me a joke

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    Back in the day, there was an app on Tivo that could capture a single screenshot of your PC and display it on screen. It was one of those HME things I think. Tivo should have come up with ChromeCast years ago. It's a shame.
     
  4. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    This type of technology has only recently become possible with 802.11n networks, H.264 encoding and PCs fast enough to capture and reencode video on the fly. Plus TiVo hasn't really been on the cutting edge of technology in quite some time. Back in the old days they were innovators, but these days they're mostly just trying to catch up. With the only recent exception perhaps being the TiVo Stream. But even that is limited to iOS only and does not support channels with H.264 encoding, so it's sort of falling behind too.
     
  5. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    Mission...
    From my understanding it's not streams from the Chromecast device you send to TiVo, but it's using the DIAL protocol so that for example YouTube videos you find on your mobile device can be sent over to TiVo via DIAL. i.e. Chromecast is just a cheap client device which supports DIAL, and TiVo series 5 will be another such client. Seems to me, though this doesn't have to be restricted to series 5 units as series 4 units could do it too, however the Flash app performance is so terrible on series 4 units that TiVo may not bother with it for those. Makes sense for Mini to support it as Flash apps on the Mini run fairly well.
    (But I probably misunderstood your post).
     
  6. sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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    I hope TiVo really does support this. You seem pretty confident. :up:
     
  7. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    I'm just going by Dave's post. I have no idea if TiVo will support it and didn't even know about DIAL until I saw Dave's article via your link. As Dave mentioned the "TiVo Developer channel" was DOA so perhaps something like this will renew interest in developing client apps that run on TiVo.
     
  8. sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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    Same here. DIAL is completely new to me as well.
     
  9. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I'm hoping the new platform with faster hardware will breath new life into the TiVo developer channel. If they add HBO and VUDU I'd never have to leave the TiVo UI. (right now I use my Samsung smart TV for most apps)
     
  10. jcthorne

    jcthorne Active Member

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    I think you guys are looking at the protocol, DIAL and Chromecast backwards.

    The TiVo would run DIAL compatible apps and direct streams to the Chromecast device just like you will do with your pda or computer. It just launches the stream on the chromecast device which is plugged in to your tv.

    For TiVo to capture or otherwise integrate the stream would require an HDMI input and intercept of the DRM encoded stream...not gonna happen on TiVo.

    So the TiVo would allow you to browse and select a stream and then you would switch HDMI ports on the tv (because TiVo is plugged in to one of them) and watch the stream. I don't see it as the TiVo controls and the interface needing to swap inputs would be very kludgey at best.

    Chromecast is a streaming device that uses a chrome browser on android or pc to provide the interface. There seems to be a lot of confusion on the net as to what Chromecast is.
     
  11. sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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    Completely disagree. TiVo would work the same way as the Chromecast dongle. If a TiVo owner is using the YouTube app on their iPad, they could easily fling the video to their TiVo connected TV or Chromecast connected TiVo. The way it works now, the TiVo app must be launched first on the TiVo. This eliminates the extra step and allows the TiVo to broadcast 'app' availability to any android or iOS app.
     
  12. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    Exactly. When you fling something from Chrome or an app that supports DIAL it asks you which device to fling it to. Your TiVo would just show up in that list.
     
  13. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that's my understanding of how it works too. Chromecast is just a DIAL client and TiVo supposedly will be another if Dave's article is true.
     
  14. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    I just tried my Chromecast on the big TV (65" LED) and it doesn't look very good when playing Netflix. I use the TVs built in Netflix app for the same show and it looks way better. Although the TV is wired and the Chromecast is wifi with only 2 bars, so that could have something to do with it.

    I also tried the casting feature of the Samsung TV (same menu as the Chromecast) it would launch the Netflix app, sometimes, but it wouldn't start the program. It would just crash and restart.

    I tried Youtube, which is supported by both devices as well, and both of them looked about the same.

    One thing the Chromecast can do, that the TV can't, is play flash based video from Chrome on my laptop. So I'll have some use for it when I miss something and need to watch it via the web instead.
     
  15. Johncv

    Johncv Active Member

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  16. Dan203

    Dan203 Super Moderator Staff Member TCF Club

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    It actually uses a thin USB cable. My TV had a USB port right next to the HDMI ports so the whole thing is still behind the TV.

    They say some TVs can actually supply power via HDMI, but mine is brand new and supports HDMI 1.4 but it still would not power the Chromecast without the USB cable.
     
  17. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    Problem with that is typically the quality of the big 4 network TV web site videos is terrible. Full screen mode on my small 17" laptop looks bad enough for most of their flash videos, I would hate to see how that looks on a 60" display and further degraded via Chromecast. If it's a decent show I'd rather pay for a good quality Amazon download to my TiVo instead.
     
  18. sbiller

    sbiller Active Member

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    It's no different than streaming a Netflix video from the Cloud. Better than streaming airplay from an iOS device.
     
  19. tenthplanet

    tenthplanet Member

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    After the internet flak dies down. Android sheep, Apple haters, Tivo haters, Roku lovers,Roku haters etc. Lets see how the general public gets along with thing. I can hear those calls to Leo (The Tech Guy on Twit) now...:D
     
  20. moyekj

    moyekj Well-Known Member

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    I strongly disagree with that. With Netflix I get mostly excellent "Super HD" 1080p/24 video quality that is actually better than what my cable company calls "HD" channels. In contrast, for example abc.com spits out very lousy quality in comparison. I'm actually very happy with video quality from Netflix and especially Amazon downloads.
     

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