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** HD TiVo and HD DirecTV TiVo FAQ **

Discussion in 'DirecTV TiVo Powered PVRs & Receivers' started by feldon23, Jan 1, 2004.

  1. Jan 25, 2005 #901 of 1440
    dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

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    Dec 3, 2000
    Long...
    Internally the receiver considers each pair (satellite & OTA) a single "virtual tuner"; so unless it can access all channels on each virtual tuner, it doesn't allow the tuner to be used at all. It would complicate conflict resolution quite a bit, which is probably why they did it this way -- it enabled them to use their scheduling/conflict resolution algorithm mostly unchanged from the SD receivers.
     
  2. Jan 25, 2005 #902 of 1440
    itzme

    itzme New Member

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    Dec 6, 2004
    That makes sense. So in short, it sounds like "it should but it won't". Well I'm glad I can at least change TV Inputs to the TV tuner and watch an OTA channel from the TV.
     
  3. Feb 14, 2005 #903 of 1440
    Bobcuch

    Bobcuch New Member

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    Feb 14, 2005
    Hi there... I am not able to put the link in this post because I am new here but, recently I read that the new Direct Tv HD TIVOs will be obsolete in about 6 months because Direct Tv is going to MPEG-4 compression. (I have the link to the article if anyone is interest. Sorry I can not post it here.) I am wondering if it would then be better to wait till Direct Tv straightens all that out before becoming an "early adopter" of the technology.

    I currently have 4 Direct Tv Tivos. We love them and I have been saving a long time to put in a dream home theater. I have been waiting for the HDTIVO and was saddened to hear that it will become worthless....

    Thoguhts? Is this true?

    Thanks!
    Bob
     
  4. Feb 14, 2005 #904 of 1440
    dswallow

    dswallow Save the ModeratŠ¾r TCF Club

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    Dec 3, 2000
    Long...
    Search around this forum and you'll find a lot of discussion and speculation on the subject.

    For most people the HR10-250 has a completely useful lifetime of at least 2 or 3 more years before DirecTV will have changed from MPEG-2 over to MPEG-4. What's happening initially is that local stations will be provided in HD using MPEG-4 and those won't be compatible with the HR10-250. So if you get your local stations over the air just fine, there's really no worry until DirecTV changes national programming in HD over to MPEG-4.

    And even then, it's becoming clearer and clearer the DirecTV is going to swap the receivers out for free (or perhaps for a token shipping cost and 1-year commitment), so your investment is protected; even better you get new technology that'll be able to record more programming without having to invest more money.

    So if you want HD today, the HR10-250 is a perfectly good choice to make. Announcing its "obsolescence" is highly premature; and even when it truly becomes obsolete, DirecTV's gonna protect your investment by giving you the new equipment you need.

    It might even work out better for people -- rumors of pricing on the Home Media Center seem to have it 50-60% higher in cost than the HR10-250; so those people who already have the HR10-250 and accept the equipment swap by DirecTV could very well end up with a better deal than those who don't. And they'll have had use of the HD DVR in the interim -- unlike those people who like sitting on the fence and whining. :)
     
  5. Feb 14, 2005 #905 of 1440
    Bobcuch

    Bobcuch New Member

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    Feb 14, 2005
    THANKS! I just found this site earlier today and have gotten now work done at the office today as I have been absorbing all the info I can. I really have waited a long time for this purchase and want to make sure I do it right. I ordered a new dish and switch last night so I am ready to go! Next comes the TV!

    Thanks again for the quick reply!
    Bob
     
  6. Feb 17, 2005 #906 of 1440
    JoeSchueller

    JoeSchueller New Member

    278
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    Jun 16, 2004
    Doug,

    The AVS Forum posting I read had it the other way around with pricing in the $500 to $600 range for the server depending on the HDD capacity and $100 for each SD remote unit. While that sounded exremely low to me, it is possible. It all depends on how motivated D* is to get MPEG4 (and perhaps KA/KU) hardware in people's hands.

    The good news was that the same poster quoted the D* credit for a HR10-250 as $900.
     
  7. Feb 17, 2005 #907 of 1440
    marley1

    marley1 New Member

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    Feb 17, 2005
    Feldon,

    Great article on the HD DirecTV Tivo. One question, any news on when the next version of this product will be released? And if so, and info on new features/cost?

    Thanks,

    Marley
     
  8. Feb 25, 2005 #908 of 1440
    buggen

    buggen New Member

    1
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    Feb 25, 2005
    Sorry if this has been covered before I did a search of this question and could not find the answer. I have a 4:3 HDTV, will I be able to watch 4:3 shows through the component output of the hr10 that fill the entire 4:3 screen? Currently I have the older Hughes HDTV receiver (model E86) and if it's set to use the component output even if the show is 480i 4:3 I get black bars all the way around the 4:3 picture. I can stretch the 480i to fill 16:9 but I hate that on a 4:3 TV.

    Thanks
     
  9. Mar 1, 2005 #909 of 1440
    zoro

    zoro New Member

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    Feb 8, 2005
    Is there any way, thjat we can skip ads from recorded HD or SD material?
     
  10. Mar 8, 2005 #910 of 1440
    qdoggg

    qdoggg Tivo Freak

    96
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    Jan 24, 2004
    SF Bay Area, CA
  11. Mar 9, 2005 #911 of 1440
    Zentaar

    Zentaar New Member

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    Nov 11, 2004
    NH
    The first wiring diagram has 2 dual tuner boxes connected to a 2 x 4. You could possibly have 4 tuners tuned into 101 odd, 101 even, 110, & 119 (odd or even). There is no way this could work with a 2 x 4 connector. You cannot draw 4 different signals through 2 lines, you need to use the 2nd wiring diagram for it to work correctly.

    The only way the first diagram will work is if you receive all your programing from a single satalite (ie the 101). I assume the first diagram is pre HDTV in which all standard channels came from the 101 satalite, but once you switch to HDTV, it will need to be rewired.
     
  12. Mar 13, 2005 #912 of 1440
    MattMDK

    MattMDK New Member

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    Mar 13, 2005
    I live in Los Angeles and can now receive ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX in HD directly through DirecTV without an OTA. This is not advertised but is available in several cities. Most of the DirecTV phone reps were unaware of this availability.
     
  13. Mar 15, 2005 #913 of 1440
    feldon23

    feldon23 MythBuster

    2,096
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    Mar 13, 2001
    Houston, TX
    I don't think the caption to that diagram could be any more concise.
     
  14. Mar 16, 2005 #914 of 1440
    baatz

    baatz TechoFobe

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    Dec 26, 2001
    Sunny Florida

    How do I find out exactly what HD programming DirecTV actually offers in my area?

    After reading threads on several different forums, I am thoroughly confused...

    I live in the Tampa DMA and I now have two DirecTivo DSR6000 units with DirecTV's Premier program subscription.

    I want to get a HDTV plasma TV (Hitachi), along with a Hughes HD10-250.

    But I do not know what network HD programming I can get from DirecTV. CBS, NBC, ABC and FOX? (OTA isn't an option for me because I live too far from the transmitters in Tampa to receive HD signals.)

    All the talk about O&O and LiL is baffling...

    Thanks, Ed
     
  15. Mar 16, 2005 #915 of 1440
    Pangloss

    Pangloss New Member

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    Mar 13, 2005
    You'd get the standard package of HD channels. PPV, Universal HD, Discovery HD, ESPN HD, and the two HD-Net channels. Showtime and HBO if you want to pay for 'em (or can talk them into some kind of deal). That's the whole shebang.

    If you pass the waiver (which they apply for on your behalf when you call DirecTV and order service) then you'll get the major networks' New York City feeds, which are conveniently positioned just below the afformentioned channels in the program guide.

    When the guy comes to install, he'll put the OTA stuff up automatically. If does put an extra antenna on the roof, so if you're really certain it won't work then I guess you can skip that part. But you never know, it might get lucky. HDTV signals can carry a long way here in flat Florida.
     
  16. Mar 16, 2005 #916 of 1440
    baatz

    baatz TechoFobe

    28
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    Dec 26, 2001
    Sunny Florida
    Pangloss:

    Thanks for the info!

    So DirecTV customers don't know if they "pass the waiver" until after they subscribe to DirecTV's HD service? What determines who is eligible for a waiver? I would really like to get HDTV now, but if I can't receive the networks in HD at this time, I'll just wait (even longer) until MPEG4 is a reality...

    My local stations' signal quality in SD is lousy where I live (about 60 miles south of Tampa) --- maybe in part due to my neighbor's huge trees that are between my house and the transmitter towers in Tampa. Maybe I should just sell my house and move closer or get out the old chainsaw? :)

    If I could get HDTV OTA that would be great. But it seems pretty unlikely?

    Should I just call DirecTV now, sign up for HD and then find out if I "pass the waiver". If I get the waiver, I can then go ahead and buy a new HDTV and HD10-250 at that point or if I don't get a waiver --- I could cancel HD service?

    Ed
     
  17. Mar 16, 2005 #917 of 1440
    Pangloss

    Pangloss New Member

    30
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    Mar 13, 2005
    That's right. I still don't know myself (got mine on the 10th). In my case it doesn't matter because I get the Miami stations perfectly (which look every bit as good as the satellite channels to my untrained eye). I was just curious to see what would happen, so I requested the waivers. My guess is they'll be denied.

    It's based on zip code, btw. I don't think you can request a waiver before you decide to purchase, but I suppose you could ask.

    The SD quality of your locals is irrelevent. The trees... I have no idea. I'm surrounded by trees, for what it's worth. But South Florida is a little flatter than Tampa, I believe.

    You should go here (AV Science Forum) and take a look at the thread they have for Tampa OTA. You will probably see posts from other people in your area, as well as posts from engineers working at the stations in your area. The South Florida thread was very helpful to me.

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?s=&forumid=45

    There's also a place where you can go and punch in your zip code and see what stations are available and what the likely reception quality will be. Unfortunately I didn't save that page and can't find it at the moment. Perhaps someone else will have it.
     
  18. Mar 16, 2005 #918 of 1440
    baatz

    baatz TechoFobe

    28
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    Dec 26, 2001
    Sunny Florida
    I REALLY don't like the idea of spending $7,000 + on new HD equipment before I know if I can even get the channels that I want to watch.

    From what I've learned up to now, getting HD from OTA is great, IF (and it is a big if?) you live close enough to get a good, strong signal. The Tampa Bay area OTA forums I've read don't sound very encouraging --- and once again, spending several thousand dollars in the "hope" that I can get the HD programming seems absurd from my biased viewpoint.

    I guess that once again, I will just have to put off buying that new HDTV plasma TV...

    Thanks anyways...
     
  19. Mar 16, 2005 #919 of 1440
    feldon23

    feldon23 MythBuster

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    Mar 13, 2001
    Houston, TX
    Order the equipment from a DirecTV installer. They'll come out and if they can't get an install, you aren't on the hook for anything. They can check HDTV reception on any TV.
     
  20. Mar 17, 2005 #920 of 1440
    leesweet

    leesweet TC Special Member

    1,902
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    Mar 13, 2004
    Northern VA...
    And/or, if you are worried about OTA, have a local antenna shop come out and do a site survey. They usually charge nothing for this if you purchase the OTA antenna install from them, and $50-100 if you can't good OTA.

    Your local thread at AVS should have recommendations on a reliable local installer.

    (For example: I wanted to get Washington and Baltimore via a rotator and a CM4228; the installed (Fairfax Antenna) said after testing there was no way I'd get B'more, and I ended up with a CM4221 that gets everything (possible) from Washington. But that info from him saved me (and cost him) several hundred dollars. That's the best way to test the OTA if you are worried.)

    You can test OTA yourself with an inside antenna if you are close enough, but it sounds like you need an external for OTA where you are. I'd much rather have a local installer test the OTA than the D* installer, who may not have a clue about OTA if he's not done a lot of it..
     

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