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Hard Drive Upgrade Info

Discussion in 'TiVo Roamio DVRs' started by amseven11, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Cox Cable...
    And how much of the MOST RECENT thread activity has anything to do with "Hard Drive Upgrade Info"?

    There's less-focused threads for things not related to Roamio HDD Upgrade info, and there's always Private Messages, if you want to pick somebody's brain about every OTHER little thing.
     
  2. MikePA1

    MikePA1 New Member

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    Nov 15, 2013
    None. Thank Post 1412 for taking the thread off track.
     
  3. Leon WIlkinson

    Leon WIlkinson TiVo Gone Wild

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    TiVo Town
    I believe the data is off set one field, missing TiVo Stream.
     
  4. thewebgal

    thewebgal MacAphile AV geek

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    Aug 10, 2007
    DC 'burbs
    Perhaps - but by design, we have just one TV system in the house -
    its very high end, but just one, so there is no need to stream to others sets around the house or on the internet -
    a $150 box plus the cost to upgrade the drive works it all works out just fine. Wifi transfers at 30Mbs is great too.

    Plus we have a TON of broadcast stations in the Wash/Baltimore area -
    if we ever drop FIOS we still have MUCH potential viewing with the base Roamio.
     
  5. headless chicken

    headless chicken Member

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    Oct 8, 2004
    Yeah, form factor is certainly a concern of mine. Not sure what installing a 3.5" hard drive in such a confined might do down the line.

    I suspect the compact design of the base model may have an adverse impact on the fan/ventilation system which in turn might cause internal and electronic components failure.
     
  6. MikePA1

    MikePA1 New Member

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    Nov 15, 2013
    Already discussed in this thread - Not an issue.
     
  7. HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    May 14, 2007
    Paradise...
    I'm not a hard drive expert by any means. I had an old Seagate Barracuda 1.5 TB laying around and I threw it into a base Roamio. It certainly appears to be working fine as suggested in is thread, but do any of you experts foresee any possible future issues?
     
  8. MikePA1

    MikePA1 New Member

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    Nov 15, 2013
    Other than a hardware failure, what other future issues could there be?

    Why are people so paranoid about the hard drive?
     
  9. HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

    5,275
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    May 14, 2007
    Paradise...
    I'm more talking issues with the "Barracuda" line with maybe heat, noise, etc as compared to the WD green and red A/V drives most seem to be using. I think I read here not to use the black drives, so just curious if there's any of those type of things with barracudas.
     
  10. Dec 1, 2013 #1430 of 3265
    kylem4711

    kylem4711 New Member

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    May 26, 2010
    California
  11. Dec 1, 2013 #1431 of 3265
    Davelnlr_

    Davelnlr_ Member

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    North...
    Ive have used nothing but Barracuda's in all my Tivo's since the Series 1, and have NEVER had a drive failure or issue with them. I used the 7200 rpm, except for the last 2TB unit, and I believe it is a 5900 rpm "green" version.
     
  12. Dec 1, 2013 #1432 of 3265
    HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    Paradise...
    Thanks. I forgot to mention mine is the 7200 rpm as well. Does that make a difference?
     
  13. Dec 1, 2013 #1433 of 3265
    aaronwt

    aaronwt UHD Addict

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    Other than more heat it shouldn't. The lower rpm drives are more than capable of dealing with at least a dozen concurrent HD read/write streams.

    The WD drives are rated for 12 concurrent streams while the Seagate drives are rated for 16 concurrent HD streams. The seagate A/V drives are 5900 rpm. The WD A/V drives must be a little slower.
     
  14. Dec 1, 2013 #1434 of 3265
    unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    semi-coastal NC
    Check Amazon and see if they were price matching newegg on it and haven't gotten around to going back up yet.
     
  15. Dec 1, 2013 #1435 of 3265
    unitron

    unitron Active Member

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    semi-coastal NC
    A Black, and probably any 7200RPM drive, is "overkill", in that a 5400 is plenty fast enough for a TiVo, and the greater spindle speed means more heat, and since it probably takes a little more current to go a little faster, that's a little more heat coming off of the power supply as well.

    But I've been successfully using some 1TB Blacks (with appropriate IDE/SATA adapters) in a couple of S2 DTs for about 3 years now.

    However, there was enough room in them to add an extra fan, and the older IDE hard drive power connection made it easy to get power to the extra fan.

    The Blacks are good, but they run "toasty".

    The WD20EURS works quite nicely in S3s, and, from what I hear, in S4s, so I'd be tempted to try a WD30EURS if I had a TiVo that'd take a 3TB drive.
     
  16. Dec 1, 2013 #1436 of 3265
    nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Cox Cable...
    Those stream ratings are for when the ATA Streaming Command Set extensions are active. They mean nothing, when the host either doesn't support them, and/or doesn't enable them.

    The drive makers have you drinking their marketing Kool-Aid, if you think those numbers correlate to a TiVo, which just writes everything as standard data. I wish I had copies to make a time-lapse slide show presentation of how many new applications the drive makers have targeted, since the first AV drives hit the market...

    I agree with the fact that a 5400/5900 RPM drive with even a SATA-2 interface, is still far more than a six-tuner consumer TV DVR even needs, mostly due to increased platter storage density, and improved technology to read and write to those high storage density platters.

    Why add more heat, and more current draw, than you need to? It also make no sense to put a 7200RPM drive in. Drives that spec-out "streams" in a context that doesn't even apply to TiVo, are just marketing tactics, that some are easily drawn to, but not necessary.

    I'm all for getting an AV-rated Green, or an AV-rated Red NAS drive, if it's because the price is right, and a longer warranty period. Otherwise, it's pointless (other than bragging rights over having a drive that can't even use its own potential, crammed into your TiVo).
     
  17. Dec 1, 2013 #1437 of 3265
    MikePA1

    MikePA1 New Member

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    Nov 15, 2013
    No, it does not make a difference. Read other posts for irrelevant techno babble.
     
  18. Dec 1, 2013 #1438 of 3265
    HarperVision

    HarperVision TiVo's Italian Cuz!

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    Paradise...
    Thanks for all the replies and "techno babble" guys! While I do love me some "techno babble", the ONLY reason I used the 1.5TB Barracuda 7200 rpm drive was because I had it here for FREE and all the other solutions would cost me money, so that is why I asked the question. All I wanted to know was whether my FREE increased TiVo storage capability would end up NOT being so free in the near future if it caused expensive issues and fixes down the road. If it isn't deemed that it will, I will save the cash and just use it.
     
  19. Dec 1, 2013 #1439 of 3265
    thewebgal

    thewebgal MacAphile AV geek

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    Aug 10, 2007
    DC 'burbs
    I am not a TIVO engineer, I've just owned a couple over the last 6 years ...

    That said - I'd want to use a NEW drive to increase capacity - otherwise, if you use a used drive, you have a greater potential of the drive failing sooner and lunching all your content.

    I don't think anyone can absolutely say using a Barracuda drive will overheat the TIVO causing other failures ... or wear down a power supply sooner ...

    There is a school here that says any change from the stock configuration has the potential to be a problem ... as always, if you change out your drive, YOU are the one taking such a risk, if there is one ...

     
  20. Dec 1, 2013 #1440 of 3265
    nooneuknow

    nooneuknow TiVo User Since 2007

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    Feb 5, 2011
    Cox Cable...
    Well said!

    However, the thing that many often overlook, is LONGEVITY.

    There's more to this than "It works fine right now, running my 7200RPM black (or other high-performance) drive".

    The cooling fans in TiVos are known for failing (although some call making excessive noise "failing"), or lessening the amount of airflow (reducing the cooling efficiency) they are supposed to provide. Although, the Roamio hasn't been out long enough to know how well the fan performs (when components are changed to ones that operate hotter), and/or how long it will last (having to run faster, to compensate, tends to shorten the life of a fan). In either case, it's more than the drive that will run hotter. More than likely, the over-spec drive will be the component that fails first, with the power supply second for probability of potential damage, or shortened life. As for the rest of the TiVo, it will likely just become unstable, and/or shut itself down, to protect itself (if airflow is reduced, stops, or the internal temperature is increased).

    Since a base Roamio has an external power supply, it's an exception to what I said above regarding the power supply being cooled by the internal TiVo fan. But, it may still have a potential to fail sooner, IF the drive in use is drawing more current than the margin the power supply is designed to deal with, as that will still increase the operating temperature inside the fully enclosed wall-wart power supply, and/or increase the amount of stress to its components.

    Remember, Green and Green AV drives are often used in tightly enclosed, non ventilated external drive enclosures. Try running a high performance drive in a sealed enclosure like that, and see how long the drive lasts.

    Even the Green/Green AV drives, when used in a sealed external enclosure, tend to fail much more quickly, which is why most who have been around these forums and taken in a lot of posts, will have seen that people have a lot of negative experiences using DVR expander drives, and will choose to try and stick to one internal drive, and not risk losing everything due to the external failing.

    I have nothing to gain, or lose, by staying silent and letting things play out, or by periodically taking the time to comment on these matters. I just like people to be informed.

    If anybody thinks what I say is "tech-babble", try reading through all the different drive data sheets/white papers (not just the marketing materials), and you will then realize I have simplified as best I can, without loosing the true meaning of it all.
     

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